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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the effects of flavanoid-rich purple grape juice on the vascular health of childhood cancer survivors: A randomized, controlled crossover trial.
Pediatr Blood Cancer
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2014
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Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease following treatment, yet few interventions have been evaluated to reduce this risk. Purple grape juice (pGJ), a rich source of flavonoids with antioxidant properties, has been shown in adults to reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial function. We examined the effects of supplementing meals with pGJ on microvascular endothelial function and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in 24 cancer survivors (ages 10-21 years).
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Dietary Inflammatory Index and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the Iowa Women's Health Study.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2014
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Colorectal cancer, the third most common cancer in the United States, has a natural history that usually encompasses several decades. Dietary components have been implicated in the etiology of colorectal cancer, perhaps through their effect on inflammation.
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Cancer survivors' uptake and adherence in diet and exercise intervention trials: An integrative data analysis.
Cancer
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2014
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The health benefits of diet and exercise interventions for cancer survivors are well documented. However, little is known regarding demographic and medical predictors of survivors' willingness to participate in diet and exercise intervention trials, study enrollment, intervention adherence, and study completion. To assist in interpreting the generalizability of trial findings and to improve the design of future trials, this study examined predictors of these process measures.
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Light-intensity activity attenuates functional decline in older cancer survivors.
Med Sci Sports Exerc
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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While moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activities (MVPA) confer the greatest health benefits, evidence suggests that light-intensity activities are also beneficial, particularly for older adults and individuals with moderate to severe comorbidities.
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Lobulitis in nonneoplastic breast tissue from breast cancer patients: association with phenotypes that are common in hereditary breast cancer.
Hum. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2013
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Lobular inflammation (lobulitis) has been demonstrated in benign breast tissue adjacent to in situ and invasive breast cancers and, more recently, in nonneoplastic tissue from prophylactic mastectomy specimens for hereditary high-risk breast carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of lobulitis in benign breast tissue of patients with breast cancer and associated clinicopathologic features. We reviewed nonneoplastic breast tissue sections from 334 patients with invasive breast carcinoma to study lobulitis in normal breast tissue and to correlate its presence with clinicopathologic features of the associated tumor. Clinical information (age, menopausal status, and follow-up), tumor characteristics (type, grade, size, lymph node status, stage, estrogen and progesterone receptor, HER2), and survival were recorded. Characteristics of women with and without lobulitis were cross-classified with categories of clinical, pathologic, and histologic characteristics, and differences in distributions were tested in univariate and multivariate analysis. Lobulitis was found in 26 (8%) of 334 patients. The lymphocytic infiltrate was predominantly T-cell type. In a multivariate model, lobulitis in patients with breast cancer was significantly associated with younger age, triple (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2)-negative cancers, and medullary phenotypes. Lobulitis in nonneoplastic breast tissue, away from tumor, is associated with clinicopathologic features more commonly seen in hereditary breast cancer.
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Significance of GATA-3 expression in outcomes of patients with breast cancer who received systemic chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy and clinicopathologic features of GATA-3-positive tumors.
Hum. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2013
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GATA-3 and estrogen receptor (ER) are involved in a positive cross-regulatory loop and are frequently coexpressed in breast cancers. GATA-3 expression was shown to be an independent predictor of overall and disease-free survival in some studies, whereas others showed no difference. However, the studies used different cutoff values for determining GATA-3 positivity and analyzed outcomes in patients who received systemic therapy together with those who did not. We investigated GATA-3 expression and correlated clinicopathologic findings and outcomes in 516 women who received systemic chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy. Nuclear staining of 1% or greater was considered positive for GATA-3, ER and progesterone receptor (PR). Of 516 cases, 436 (84.5%) were GATA-3+. GATA-3+ tumors were more likely to be grade 1 or 2, ER+, PR+, non-triple-negative phenotypes (all P < .0001), and higher stage (P = .01). ER-/GATA-3+ tumors, compared with ER-/GATA-3- tumors, had worse breast cancer survival (BCS) (P = .02) and a trend for worse overall survival (OS) (P = .05) in univariate analysis. However, there was no difference in OS and BCS between patients who received chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy among GATA-3-positive and GATA-3-negative groups. GATA-3+ tumors are correlated with lower grade, ER+, PR+, and non-triple-negative phenotypes. Although there was no difference in OS and BCS between GATA-3-positive and GATA-3-negative groups, there was an adverse effect of GATA-3 expression in the ER-negative subgroup of patients who received systemic therapy.
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Harvest for health gardening intervention feasibility study in cancer survivors.
Acta Oncol
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2013
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Cancer survivors are at increased risk for second malignancies, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and functional decline. Evidence suggests that a healthful diet and physical activity may reduce the risk of chronic disease and improve health in this population.
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Risk of adult acute and chronic myeloid leukemia with cigarette smoking and cessation.
Cancer Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2013
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Cigarette smoking is an established risk factor for adult myeloid leukemia, particularly acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but less is known about the nature of this association and effects of smoking cessation on risk.
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Maternal prenatal cigarette, alcohol and illicit drug use and risk of infant leukaemia: a report from the Childrens Oncology Group.
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 08-10-2011
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Several case-control studies have evaluated associations between maternal smoking, alcohol consumption and illicit drug use during pregnancy and risk of childhood leukaemia. Few studies have specifically focused on infants (<1 year) with leukaemia, a group that is biologically and clinically distinct from older children. We present data from a Childrens Oncology Group case-control study of 443 infants diagnosed with acute leukaemia [including acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)] between 1996 and 2006 and 324 population controls. Mothers were queried about their cigarette, alcohol and illicit drug use 1 year before and throughout pregnancy. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals [CI] were calculated using adjusted unconditional logistic regression models. Maternal smoking (>1 cigarette/day) and illicit drug use (any amount) before and/or during pregnancy were not significantly associated with infant leukaemia. Alcohol use (>1 drink/week) during pregnancy was inversely associated with infant leukaemia overall [OR = 0.64; 95% CI 0.43, 0.94], AML [OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.28, 0.87], and leukaemia with mixed lineage leukaemia gene rearrangements (MLL+) [OR = 0.59; 95% CI 0.36, 0.97]. While our results agree with the fairly consistent evidence that maternal cigarette smoking is not associated with childhood leukaemia, the data regarding alcohol and illicit drug use are not consistent with prior reports and are difficult to interpret. It is possible that unhealthy maternal behaviours during pregnancy, some of which carry potential legal consequences, may not be adequately measured using only self-report. Future case-control studies of childhood leukaemia that pursue these exposures may benefit from incorporation of validated instruments and/or biomarkers when feasible.
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Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and acetaminophen use and risk of adult myeloid leukemia.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2011
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Little is known about the causes of adult leukemia. A few small studies have reported a reduced risk associated with regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID).
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Comparability and representativeness of control groups in a case-control study of infant leukemia: a report from the Childrens Oncology Group.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2009
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Traditionally, controls in US pediatric cancer studies were selected through random digit dialing. With declining participation and lack of nonparticipant information, random digit dialing (RDD) controls may be substandard. Birth certificate (BC) controls are an alternative, because they are population based and include data from nonparticipants. The authors examined controls collected by random digit dialing and birth certificates for a Childrens Oncology Group case-control study of infant leukemia in 1995-2006. Demographic variables were used to assess differences in RDD and BC controls and their representativeness. RDD and BC controls did not differ significantly with regard to maternal variables (age, race, education, marital status, alcohol during pregnancy) or child variables (sex, gestational age, birth weight), but they varied in smoking during pregnancy (22% RDD controls, 12% BC controls) (P = 0.05). The studys combined control group differed significantly from US births: Mothers of controls were more likely to be older (29.8 vs. 27.2 years), white (84% vs. 59%), and married (85% vs. 67%) and to have >16 years of education (37% vs. 25%). Control children were more often full term (88% vs. 81%) and heavier (3,436 vs. 3,317 g). Finally, participating BC mothers were likely to be older and to have more education than nonparticipants. Thus, the studys control groups were comparable but differed from the population of interest.
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The role of obesity in cancer survival and recurrence.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
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Obesity and components of energy imbalance, that is, excessive energy intake and suboptimal levels of physical activity, are established risk factors for cancer incidence. Accumulating evidence suggests that these factors also may be important after the diagnosis of cancer and influence the course of disease, as well as overall health, well-being, and survival. Lifestyle and medical interventions that effectively modify these factors could potentially be harnessed as a means of cancer control. However, for such interventions to be maximally effective and sustainable, broad sweeping scientific discoveries ranging from molecular and cellular advances, to developments in delivering interventions on both individual and societal levels are needed. This review summarizes key discussion topics that were addressed in a recent Institute of Medicine Workshop entitled, "The Role of Obesity in Cancer Survival and Recurrence"; discussions included (i) mechanisms associated with obesity and energy balance that influence cancer progression; (ii) complexities of studying and interpreting energy balance in relation to cancer recurrence and survival; (iii) associations between obesity and cancer risk, recurrence, and mortality; (iv) interventions that promote weight loss, increased physical activity, and negative energy balance as a means of cancer control; and (v) future directions.
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Medical conditions and risk of adult myeloid leukemia.
Cancer Causes Control
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Although a few previous studies have reported positive associations between adult myeloid leukemia and a history of certain medical conditions, the etiology of most cases remains largely unknown. Our purpose was to examine associations between certain medical conditions and adult myeloid leukemia.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.