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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Pleiotropic effects of lipid genes on plasma glucose, HbA1c, and HOMA-IR levels.
Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2014
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Dyslipidemia is strongly associated with raised plasma glucose levels and insulin resistance (IR), and genome-wide association studies have identified 95 loci that explain a substantial proportion of the variance in blood lipids. However, the loci's effects on glucose-related traits are largely unknown. We have studied these lipid loci and tested their association collectively and individually with fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and IR in two independent cohorts: 10,995 subjects from LifeLines Cohort Study and 2,438 subjects from Prevention of Renal and Vascular Endstage Disease (PREVEND) study. In contrast to the positive relationship between dyslipidemia and glucose traits, the genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia showed a pleiotropic lowering effect on glucose traits. Specifically, the genetic risk score related to higher triglyceride level was correlated with lower levels of FPG (P = 9.6 × 10(-10) and P = 0.03 in LifeLines and PREVEND, respectively), HbA1c (P = 4.2 × 10(-7) in LifeLines), and HOMA of estimated IR (P = 6.2 × 10(-4) in PREVEND), after adjusting for blood lipid levels. At the single nucleotide polymorphism level, 15 lipid loci showed a pleiotropic association with glucose traits (P < 0.01), of which eight (CETP, MLXIPL, PLTP, GCKR, APOB, APOE-C1-C2, CYP7A1, and TIMD4) had opposite allelic directions of effect on dyslipidemia and glucose levels. Our findings suggest a complex genetic regulation and metabolic interplay between lipids and glucose.
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Gene-centric meta-analysis in 87,736 individuals of European ancestry identifies multiple blood-pressure-related loci.
Vinicius Tragante, Michael R Barnes, Santhi K Ganesh, Matthew B Lanktree, Wei Guo, Nora Franceschini, Erin N Smith, Toby Johnson, Michael V Holmes, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Konrad J Karczewski, Berta Almoguera, John Barnard, Jens Baumert, Yen-Pei Christy Chang, Clara C Elbers, Martin Farrall, Mary E Fischer, Tom R Gaunt, Johannes M I H Gho, Christian Gieger, Anuj Goel, Yan Gong, Aaron Isaacs, Marcus E Kleber, Irene Mateo Leach, Caitrin W McDonough, Matthijs F L Meijs, Olle Melander, Christopher P Nelson, Ilja M Nolte, Nathan Pankratz, Tom S Price, Jonathan Shaffer, Sonia Shah, Maciej Tomaszewski, Peter J van der Most, Erik P A van Iperen, Judith M Vonk, Kate Witkowska, Caroline O L Wong, Li Zhang, Amber L Beitelshees, Gerald S Berenson, Deepak L Bhatt, Morris Brown, Amber Burt, Rhonda M Cooper-DeHoff, John M Connell, Karen J Cruickshanks, Sean P Curtis, George Davey-Smith, Christian Delles, Ron T Gansevoort, Xiuqing Guo, Shen Haiqing, Claire E Hastie, Marten H Hofker, G Kees Hovingh, Daniel S Kim, Susan A Kirkland, Barbara E Klein, Ronald Klein, Yun R Li, Steffi Maiwald, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Eoin T O'Brien, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Walter Palmas, Afshin Parsa, Brenda W Penninx, Mary Pettinger, Ramachandran S Vasan, Jane E Ranchalis, Paul M Ridker, Lynda M Rose, Peter Sever, Daichi Shimbo, Laura Steele, Ronald P Stolk, Barbara Thorand, Mieke D Trip, Cornelia M van Duijn, W Monique Verschuren, Cisca Wijmenga, Sharon Wyatt, J Hunter Young, Aeilko H Zwinderman, Connie R Bezzina, Eric Boerwinkle, Juan P Casas, Mark J Caulfield, Aravinda Chakravarti, Daniel I Chasman, Karina W Davidson, Pieter A Doevendans, Anna F Dominiczak, Garret A FitzGerald, John G Gums, Myriam Fornage, Hakon Hakonarson, Indrani Halder, Hans L Hillege, Thomas Illig, Gail P Jarvik, Julie A Johnson, John J P Kastelein, Wolfgang Koenig, Meena Kumari, Winfried März, Sarah S Murray, Jeffery R O'Connell, Albertine J Oldehinkel, James S Pankow, Daniel J Rader, Susan Redline, Muredach P Reilly, Eric E Schadt, Kandice Kottke-Marchant, Harold Snieder, Michael Snyder, Alice V Stanton, Martin D Tobin, André G Uitterlinden, Pim van der Harst, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Nilesh J Samani, Hugh Watkins, Andrew D Johnson, Alex P Reiner, Xiaofeng Zhu, Paul I W de Bakker, Daniel Levy, Folkert W Asselbergs, Patricia B Munroe, Brendan J Keating.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2014
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Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ~50,000 SNPs in up to 87,736 individuals of European ancestry and combined these in a meta-analysis. We replicated findings in an independent set of 68,368 individuals of European ancestry. Our analyses identified 11 previously undescribed associations in independent loci containing 31 genes including PDE1A, HLA-DQB1, CDK6, PRKAG2, VCL, H19, NUCB2, RELA, HOXC@ complex, FBN1, and NFAT5 at the Bonferroni-corrected array-wide significance threshold (p < 6 × 10(-7)) and confirmed 27 previously reported associations. Bioinformatic analysis of the 11 loci provided support for a putative role in hypertension of several genes, such as CDK6 and NUCB2. Analysis of potential pharmacological targets in databases of small molecules showed that ten of the genes are predicted to be a target for small molecules. In summary, we identified previously unknown loci associated with BP. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, which may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention or drug response stratification.
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Mendelian randomization of blood lipids for coronary heart disease.
Eur. Heart J.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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To investigate the causal role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides in coronary heart disease (CHD) using multiple instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization.
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Causal effects of body mass index on cardiometabolic traits and events: a Mendelian randomization analysis.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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Elevated body mass index (BMI) associates with cardiometabolic traits on observational analysis, yet the underlying causal relationships remain unclear. We conducted Mendelian randomization analyses by using a genetic score (GS) comprising 14 BMI-associated SNPs from a recent discovery analysis to investigate the causal role of BMI in cardiometabolic traits and events. We used eight population-based cohorts, including 34,538 European-descent individuals (4,407 type 2 diabetes (T2D), 6,073 coronary heart disease (CHD), and 3,813 stroke cases). A 1 kg/m(2) genetically elevated BMI increased fasting glucose (0.18 mmol/l; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.12-0.24), fasting insulin (8.5%; 95% CI = 5.9-11.1), interleukin-6 (7.0%; 95% CI = 4.0-10.1), and systolic blood pressure (0.70 mmHg; 95% CI = 0.24-1.16) and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-0.02 mmol/l; 95% CI = -0.03 to -0.01) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C; -0.04 mmol/l; 95% CI = -0.07 to -0.01). Observational and causal estimates were directionally concordant, except for LDL-C. A 1 kg/m(2) genetically elevated BMI increased the odds of T2D (odds ratio [OR] = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.18-1.36) but did not alter risk of CHD (OR 1.01; 95% CI = 0.94-1.08) or stroke (OR = 1.03; 95% CI = 0.95-1.12). A meta-analysis incorporating published studies reporting 27,465 CHD events in 219,423 individuals yielded a pooled OR of 1.04 (95% CI = 0.97-1.12) per 1 kg/m(2) increase in BMI. In conclusion, we identified causal effects of BMI on several cardiometabolic traits; however, whether BMI causally impacts CHD risk requires further evidence.
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Gene-centric meta-analyses for central adiposity traits in up to 57,412 individuals of European descent confirm known loci and reveal several novel associations.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2013
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Waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) are surrogate measures of central adiposity that are associated with adverse cardiovascular events, type 2 diabetes, and cancer independent of body mass index (BMI). WC and WHR are highly heritable with multiple susceptibility loci identified to date. We assessed the association between SNPs and BMI-adjusted WC and WHR and unadjusted WC in up to 57,412 individuals of European descent from 22 cohorts collaborating with the NHLBIs Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) project. The study population consisted of women and men aged 20 to 80. Study participants were genotyped using the ITMAT/Broad/CARE array, which includes ?50,000 cosmopolitan tagged SNPs across ?2,100 cardiovascular-related genes. Each trait was modeled as a function of age, study site, and principal components to control for population stratification, and we conducted a fixed-effects meta-analysis. No new loci for WC were observed. For WHR analyses, three novel loci were significantly associated (P<2.4x10(-6)). Previously unreported rs2811337-G near TMCC1 was associated with increased WHR (?±SE,0.048±0.008, P=7.7x10(-9)) as was rs7302703-G in HOXC10 (?=0.044±0.008, P=2.9x10(-7)) and rs936108-C in PEMT (?=0.035±0.007, P=1.9x10(-6)). Sex-stratified analyses revealed two additional novel signals among females only, rs12076073-A near SHC1 (?=0.10±0.02, P=1.9x10(-6)), and rs1037575-A in ATBDB4 (?=0.046±0.01, P=2.2x10(-6)), supporting an already established sexual dimorphism of central adiposity-related genetic variants. Functional analysis using ENCODE and eQTL databases revealed that several of these loci are in regulatory regions or regions with differential expression in adipose tissue.
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Comparison Between Southern Blots and qPCR Analysis of Leukocyte Telomere Length in the Health ABC Study.
J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2013
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Only a few studies, primarily limited to small samples, have examined the relationship between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) data generated by Southern blots, expressed in kilobases, versus quantitative PCR data, expressed in the telomere product/a single gene product (T/S). In the present study, we compared LTL data generated by the two methods in 681 elderly participants (50% African Americans, 50% of European origin, 49.2% women, mean age 73.7±2.9 years) in the Health Aging and Body Composition Study. The correlation between the data generated by the two methods was modest (R(2) = .27). Both methods captured the age effect on LTL and the longer LTL in women than in men. However, only the Southern blot method showed a significantly longer LTL in African Americans than in European decent individuals, which might be attributed to the larger measurement error of the quantitative PCR-based method than the Southern blots.
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The Genome of the Netherlands: design, and project goals.
Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2013
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Within the Netherlands a national network of biobanks has been established (Biobanking and Biomolecular Research Infrastructure-Netherlands (BBMRI-NL)) as a national node of the European BBMRI. One of the aims of BBMRI-NL is to enrich biobanks with different types of molecular and phenotype data. Here, we describe the Genome of the Netherlands (GoNL), one of the projects within BBMRI-NL. GoNL is a whole-genome-sequencing project in a representative sample consisting of 250 trio-families from all provinces in the Netherlands, which aims to characterize DNA sequence variation in the Dutch population. The parent-offspring trios include adult individuals ranging in age from 19 to 87 years (mean=53 years; SD=16 years) from birth cohorts 1910-1994. Sequencing was done on blood-derived DNA from uncultured cells and accomplished coverage was 14-15x. The family-based design represents a unique resource to assess the frequency of regional variants, accurately reconstruct haplotypes by family-based phasing, characterize short indels and complex structural variants, and establish the rate of de novo mutational events. GoNL will also serve as a reference panel for imputation in the available genome-wide association studies in Dutch and other cohorts to refine association signals and uncover population-specific variants. GoNL will create a catalog of human genetic variation in this sample that is uniquely characterized with respect to micro-geographic location and a wide range of phenotypes. The resource will be made available to the research and medical community to guide the interpretation of sequencing projects. The present paper summarizes the global characteristics of the project.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 29 May 2013; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2013.118.
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Loci influencing blood pressure identified using a cardiovascular gene-centric array.
Santhi K Ganesh, Vinicius Tragante, Wei Guo, Yiran Guo, Matthew B Lanktree, Erin N Smith, Toby Johnson, Berta Almoguera Castillo, John Barnard, Jens Baumert, Yen-Pei Christy Chang, Clara C Elbers, Martin Farrall, Mary E Fischer, Nora Franceschini, Tom R Gaunt, Johannes M I H Gho, Christian Gieger, Yan Gong, Aaron Isaacs, Marcus E Kleber, Irene Mateo Leach, Caitrin W McDonough, Matthijs F L Meijs, Olle Mellander, Cliona M Molony, Ilja M Nolte, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Tom S Price, Ramakrishnan Rajagopalan, Jonathan Shaffer, Sonia Shah, Haiqing Shen, Nicole Soranzo, Peter J van der Most, Erik P A van Iperen, Jessica van Setten, Jessic A Van Setten, Judith M Vonk, Li Zhang, Amber L Beitelshees, Gerald S Berenson, Deepak L Bhatt, Jolanda M A Boer, Eric Boerwinkle, Ben Burkley, Amber Burt, Aravinda Chakravarti, Wei Chen, Rhonda M Cooper-DeHoff, Sean P Curtis, Albert Dreisbach, David Duggan, Georg B Ehret, Richard R Fabsitz, Myriam Fornage, Ervin Fox, Clement E Furlong, Ron T Gansevoort, Marten H Hofker, G Kees Hovingh, Susan A Kirkland, Kandice Kottke-Marchant, Abdullah Kutlar, Andrea Z LaCroix, Taimour Y Langaee, Yun R Li, Honghuang Lin, Kiang Liu, Steffi Maiwald, Rainer Malik, , Gurunathan Murugesan, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Jeffery R O'Connell, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Willem H Ouwehand, Walter Palmas, Brenda W Penninx, Carl J Pepine, Mary Pettinger, Joseph F Polak, Vasan S Ramachandran, Jane Ranchalis, Susan Redline, Paul M Ridker, Lynda M Rose, Hubert Scharnag, Nicholas J Schork, Daichi Shimbo, Alan R Shuldiner, Sathanur R Srinivasan, Ronald P Stolk, Herman A Taylor, Barbara Thorand, Mieke D Trip, Cornelia M van Duijn, W Monique Verschuren, Cisca Wijmenga, Bernhard R Winkelmann, Sharon Wyatt, J Hunter Young, Bernhard O Boehm, Mark J Caulfield, Daniel I Chasman, Karina W Davidson, Pieter A Doevendans, Garret A FitzGerald, John G Gums, Hakon Hakonarson, Hans L Hillege, Thomas Illig, Gail P Jarvik, Julie A Johnson, John J P Kastelein, Wolfgang Koenig, Winfried März, Braxton D Mitchell, Sarah S Murray, Albertine J Oldehinkel, Daniel J Rader, Muredach P Reilly, Alex P Reiner, Eric E Schadt, Roy L Silverstein, Harold Snieder, Alice V Stanton, André G Uitterlinden, Pim van der Harst, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Nilesh J Samani, Andrew D Johnson, Patricia B Munroe, Paul I W de Bakker, Xiaofeng Zhu, Daniel Levy, Brendan J Keating, Folkert W Asselbergs.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2013
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Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable determinant of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ?50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ?2100 candidate genes for cardiovascular phenotypes in 61 619 individuals of European ancestry from cohort studies in the USA and Europe. We identified novel associations between rs347591 and SBP (chromosome 3p25.3, in an intron of HRH1) and between rs2169137 and DBP (chromosome1q32.1 in an intron of MDM4) and between rs2014408 and SBP (chromosome 11p15 in an intron of SOX6), previously reported to be associated with MAP. We also confirmed 10 previously known loci associated with SBP, DBP, MAP or PP (ADRB1, ATP2B1, SH2B3/ATXN2, CSK, CYP17A1, FURIN, HFE, LSP1, MTHFR, SOX6) at array-wide significance (P < 2.4 × 10(-6)). We then replicated these associations in an independent set of 65 886 individuals of European ancestry. The findings from expression QTL (eQTL) analysis showed associations of SNPs in the MDM4 region with MDM4 expression. We did not find any evidence of association of the two novel SNPs in MDM4 and HRH1 with sequelae of high BP including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or stroke. In summary, we identified two novel loci associated with BP and confirmed multiple previously reported associations. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, some of which may eventually provide new targets for therapeutic intervention.
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Low fertility and the risk of type 2 diabetes in women.
Hum. Reprod.
PUBLISHED: 10-16-2011
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Fertility problems are frequently followed by early menopause, and early menopause has been associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thus far, it is unknown whether low fertility is independently associated with future T2D risk.
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Trans-eQTLs reveal that independent genetic variants associated with a complex phenotype converge on intermediate genes, with a major role for the HLA.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2011
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For many complex traits, genetic variants have been found associated. However, it is still mostly unclear through which downstream mechanism these variants cause these phenotypes. Knowledge of these intermediate steps is crucial to understand pathogenesis, while also providing leads for potential pharmacological intervention. Here we relied upon natural human genetic variation to identify effects of these variants on trans-gene expression (expression quantitative trait locus mapping, eQTL) in whole peripheral blood from 1,469 unrelated individuals. We looked at 1,167 published trait- or disease-associated SNPs and observed trans-eQTL effects on 113 different genes, of which we replicated 46 in monocytes of 1,490 different individuals and 18 in a smaller dataset that comprised subcutaneous adipose, visceral adipose, liver tissue, and muscle tissue. HLA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were 10-fold enriched for trans-eQTLs: 48% of the trans-acting SNPs map within the HLA, including ulcerative colitis susceptibility variants that affect plausible candidate genes AOAH and TRBV18 in trans. We identified 18 pairs of unlinked SNPs associated with the same phenotype and affecting expression of the same trans-gene (21 times more than expected, P<10(-16)). This was particularly pronounced for mean platelet volume (MPV): Two independent SNPs significantly affect the well-known blood coagulation genes GP9 and F13A1 but also C19orf33, SAMD14, VCL, and GNG11. Several of these SNPs have a substantially higher effect on the downstream trans-genes than on the eventual phenotypes, supporting the concept that the effects of these SNPs on expression seems to be much less multifactorial. Therefore, these trans-eQTLs could well represent some of the intermediate genes that connect genetic variants with their eventual complex phenotypic outcomes.
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Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height.
Matthew B Lanktree, Yiran Guo, Muhammed Murtaza, Joseph T Glessner, Swneke D Bailey, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Guillaume Lettre, Halit Ongen, Ramakrishnan Rajagopalan, Toby Johnson, Haiqing Shen, Christopher P Nelson, Norman Klopp, Jens Baumert, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Nathan Pankratz, James S Pankow, Sonia Shah, Kira Taylor, John Barnard, Bas J Peters, Cliona M Maloney, Maximilian T Lobmeyer, Alice Stanton, M Hadi Zafarmand, Simon P R Romaine, Amar Mehta, Erik P A van Iperen, Yan Gong, Tom S Price, Erin N Smith, Cecilia E Kim, Yun R Li, Folkert W Asselbergs, Larry D Atwood, Kristian M Bailey, Deepak Bhatt, Florianne Bauer, Elijah R Behr, Tushar Bhangale, Jolanda M A Boer, Bernhard O Boehm, Jonathan P Bradfield, Morris Brown, Peter S Braund, Paul R Burton, Cara Carty, Hareesh R Chandrupatla, Wei Chen, John Connell, Chrysoula Dalgeorgou, Anthonius de Boer, Fotios Drenos, Clara C Elbers, James C Fang, Caroline S Fox, Edward C Frackelton, Barry Fuchs, Clement E Furlong, Quince Gibson, Christian Gieger, Anuj Goel, Diederik E Grobbee, Claire Hastie, Philip J Howard, Guan-Hua Huang, W Craig Johnson, Qing Li, Marcus E Kleber, Barbara E K Klein, Ronald Klein, Charles Kooperberg, Bonnie Ky, Andrea LaCroix, Paul Lanken, Mark Lathrop, Mingyao Li, Vanessa Marshall, Olle Melander, Frank D Mentch, Nuala J Meyer, Keri L Monda, Alexandre Montpetit, Gurunathan Murugesan, Karen Nakayama, Dave Nondahl, Abiodun Onipinla, Suzanne Rafelt, Stephen J Newhouse, F George Otieno, Sanjey R Patel, Mary E Putt, Santiago Rodriguez, Radwan N Safa, Douglas B Sawyer, Pamela J Schreiner, Claire Simpson, Suthesh Sivapalaratnam, Sathanur R Srinivasan, Christine Suver, Gary Swergold, Nancy K Sweitzer, Kelly A Thomas, Barbara Thorand, Nicholas J Timpson, Sam Tischfield, Martin Tobin, Maciej Tomaszewski, Maciej Tomaszweski, W M Monique Verschuren, Chris Wallace, Bernhard Winkelmann, Haitao Zhang, Dongling Zheng, Li Zhang, Joseph M Zmuda, Robert Clarke, Anthony J Balmforth, John Danesh, Ian N Day, Nicholas J Schork, Paul I W de Bakker, Christian Delles, David Duggan, Aroon D Hingorani, Joel N Hirschhorn, Marten H Hofker, Steve E Humphries, Mika Kivimäki, Debbie A Lawlor, Kandice Kottke-Marchant, Jessica L Mega, Braxton D Mitchell, David A Morrow, Jutta Palmen, Susan Redline, Denis C Shields, Alan R Shuldiner, Patrick M Sleiman, George Davey Smith, Martin Farrall, Yalda Jamshidi, David C Christiani, Juan P Casas, Alistair S Hall, Pieter A Doevendans, Jason D Christie, Gerald S Berenson, Sarah S Murray, Thomas Illig, Gerald W Dorn, Thomas P Cappola, Eric Boerwinkle, Peter Sever, Daniel J Rader, Muredach P Reilly, Mark Caulfield, Philippa J Talmud, Eric Topol, James C Engert, Kai Wang, Anna Dominiczak, Anders Hamsten, Sean P Curtis, Roy L Silverstein, Leslie A Lange, Marc S Sabatine, Mieke Trip, Danish Saleheen, John F Peden, Karen J Cruickshanks, Winfried März, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Olaf H Klungel, Cisca Wijmenga, Anke Hilse Maitland-van der Zee, Eric E Schadt, Julie A Johnson, Gail P Jarvik, George J Papanicolaou, , Struan F A Grant, Patricia B Munroe, Kari E North, Nilesh J Samani, Wolfgang Koenig, Tom R Gaunt, Sonia S Anand, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Nicole Soranzo, Garret A FitzGerald, Alex Reiner, Robert A Hegele, Hakon Hakonarson, Brendan J Keating.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2010
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Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10(-6)), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10(-8)). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10(-11)). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait.
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Evolutionary and functional analysis of celiac risk loci reveals SH2B3 as a protective factor against bacterial infection.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2010
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Celiac disease (CD) is an intolerance to dietary proteins of wheat, barley, and rye. CD may have substantial morbidity, yet it is quite common with a prevalence of 1%-2% in Western populations. It is not clear why the CD phenotype is so prevalent despite its negative effects on human health, especially because appropriate treatment in the form of a gluten-free diet has only been available since the 1950s, when dietary gluten was discovered to be the triggering factor. The high prevalence of CD might suggest that genes underlying this disease may have been favored by the process of natural selection. We assessed signatures of selection for ten confirmed CD-associated loci in several genome-wide data sets, comprising 8154 controls from four European populations and 195 individuals from a North African population, by studying haplotype lengths via the integrated haplotype score (iHS) method. Consistent signs of positive selection for CD-associated derived alleles were observed in three loci: IL12A, IL18RAP, and SH2B3. For the SH2B3 risk allele, we also show a difference in allele frequency distribution (Fst) between HapMap phase II populations. Functional investigation of the effect of the SH2B3 genotype in response to lipopolysaccharide and muramyl dipeptide revealed that carriers of the SH2B3 rs3184504*A risk allele showed stronger activation of the NOD2 recognition pathway. This suggests that SH2B3 plays a role in protection against bacteria infection, and it provides a possible explanation for the selective sweep on SH2B3, which occurred sometime between 1200 and 1700 years ago.
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PTPN1 polymorphisms are associated with total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2010
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The protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 1 (PTPN1) gene encodes for the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, which suppresses the signaling pathway of insulin. Variations in PTPN1 may lead to changes in insulin sensitivity and consequent changes in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity may also contribute to the development of metabolic endophenotypes. Our aim was to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the PTPN1 gene and metabolic endophenotypes and insulin sensitivity.
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Human dectin-1 deficiency and mucocutaneous fungal infections.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 10-30-2009
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Mucocutaneous fungal infections are typically found in patients who have no known immune defects. We describe a family in which four women who were affected by either recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis or onychomycosis had the early-stop-codon mutation Tyr238X in the beta-glucan receptor dectin-1. The mutated form of dectin-1 was poorly expressed, did not mediate beta-glucan binding, and led to defective production of cytokines (interleukin-17, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6) after stimulation with beta-glucan or Candida albicans. In contrast, fungal phagocytosis and fungal killing were normal in the patients, explaining why dectin-1 deficiency was not associated with invasive fungal infections and highlighting the specific role of dectin-1 in human mucosal antifungal defense.
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Obesity genes identified in genome-wide association studies are associated with adiposity measures and potentially with nutrient-specific food preference.
Am. J. Clin. Nutr.
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2009
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New genetic loci, most of which are expressed in the brain, have recently been reported to contribute to the development of obesity. The brain, especially the hypothalamus, is strongly involved in regulating weight and food intake.
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Using genome-wide pathway analysis to unravel the etiology of complex diseases.
Genet. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2009
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Several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been published on various complex diseases. Although, new loci are found to be associated with these diseases, still only very little of the genetic risk for these diseases can be explained. As GWAS are still underpowered to find small main effects, and gene-gene interactions are likely to play a role, the data might currently not be analyzed to its full potential. In this study, we evaluated alternative methods to study GWAS data. Instead of focusing on the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the highest statistical significance, we took advantage of prior biological information and tried to detect overrepresented pathways in the GWAS data. We evaluated whether pathway classification analysis can help prioritize the biological pathways most likely to be involved in the disease etiology. In this study, we present the various benefits and limitations of pathway-classification tools in analyzing GWAS data. We show multiple differences in outcome between pathway tools analyzing the same dataset. Furthermore, analyzing randomly selected SNPs always results in significantly overrepresented pathways, large pathways have a higher chance of becoming statistically significant and the bioinformatics tools used in this study are biased toward detecting well-defined pathways. As an example, we analyzed data from two GWAS on type 2 diabetes (T2D): the Diabetes Genetics Initiative (DGI) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). Occasionally the results from the DGI and the WTCCC GWAS showed concordance in overrepresented pathways, but discordance in the corresponding genes. Thus, incorporating gene networks and pathway classification tools into the analysis can point toward significantly overrepresented molecular pathways, which cannot be picked up using traditional single-locus analyses. However, the limitations discussed in this study, need to be addressed before these methods can be widely used.
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Variants in neuropeptide Y receptor 1 and 5 are associated with nutrient-specific food intake and are under recent selection in Europeans.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2009
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There is a large variation in caloric intake and macronutrient preference between individuals and between ethnic groups, and these food intake patterns show a strong heritability. The transition to new food sources during the agriculture revolution around 11,000 years ago probably created selective pressure and shaped the genome of modern humans. One major player in energy homeostasis is the appetite-stimulating hormone neuropeptide Y, in which the stimulatory capacity may be mediated by the neuropeptide Y receptors 1, 2 and 5 (NPY1R, NPY2R and NPY5R). We assess association between variants in the NPY1R, NPY2R and NPY5R genes and nutrient intake in a cross-sectional, single-center study of 400 men aged 40 to 80 years, and we examine whether genomic regions containing these genes show signatures of recent selection in 270 HapMap individuals (90 Africans, 90 Asians, and 90 Caucasians) and in 846 Dutch bloodbank controls. Our results show that derived alleles in NPY1R and NPY5R are associated with lower carbohydrate intake, mainly because of a lower consumption of mono- and disaccharides. We also show that carriers of these derived alleles, on average, consume meals with a lower glycemic index and glycemic load and have higher alcohol consumption. One of these variants shows the hallmark of recent selection in Europe. Our data suggest that lower carbohydrate intake, consuming meals with a low glycemic index and glycemic load, and/or higher alcohol consumption, gave a survival advantage in Europeans since the agricultural revolution. This advantage could lie in overall health benefits, because lower carbohydrate intake, consuming meals with a low GI and GL, and/or higher alcohol consumption, are known to be associated with a lower risk of chronic diseases.
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Gene-centric meta-analysis of lipid traits in African, East Asian and Hispanic populations.
PLoS ONE
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Meta-analyses of European populations has successfully identified genetic variants in over 100 loci associated with lipid levels, but our knowledge in other ethnicities remains limited. To address this, we performed dense genotyping of ?2,000 candidate genes in 7,657 African Americans, 1,315 Hispanics and 841 East Asians, using the IBC array, a custom ?50,000 SNP genotyping array. Meta-analyses confirmed 16 lipid loci previously established in European populations at genome-wide significance level, and found multiple independent association signals within these lipid loci. Initial discovery and in silico follow-up in 7,000 additional African American samples, confirmed two novel loci: rs5030359 within ICAM1 is associated with total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (p?=?8.8×10(-7) and p?=?1.5×10(-6) respectively) and a nonsense mutation rs3211938 within CD36 is associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels (p?=?13.5×10(-12)). The rs3211938-G allele, which is nearly absent in European and Asian populations, has been previously found to be associated with CD36 deficiency and shows a signature of selection in Africans and African Americans. Finally, we have evaluated the effect of SNPs established in European populations on lipid levels in multi-ethnic populations and show that most known lipid association signals span across ethnicities. However, differences between populations, especially differences in allele frequency, can be leveraged to identify novel signals, as shown by the discovery of ICAM1 and CD36 in the current report.
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Large-scale gene-centric meta-analysis across 32 studies identifies multiple lipid loci.
Folkert W Asselbergs, Yiran Guo, Erik P A van Iperen, Suthesh Sivapalaratnam, Vinicius Tragante, Matthew B Lanktree, Leslie A Lange, Berta Almoguera, Yolande E Appelman, John Barnard, Jens Baumert, Amber L Beitelshees, Tushar R Bhangale, Yii-Der Ida Chen, Tom R Gaunt, Yan Gong, Jemma C Hopewell, Toby Johnson, Marcus E Kleber, Taimour Y Langaee, Mingyao Li, Yun R Li, Kiang Liu, Caitrin W McDonough, Matthijs F L Meijs, Rita P S Middelberg, Kiran Musunuru, Christopher P Nelson, Jeffery R O'Connell, Sandosh Padmanabhan, James S Pankow, Nathan Pankratz, Suzanne Rafelt, Ramakrishnan Rajagopalan, Simon P R Romaine, Nicholas J Schork, Jonathan Shaffer, Haiqing Shen, Erin N Smith, Sam E Tischfield, Peter J van der Most, Jana V van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Niek Verweij, Kelly A Volcik, Li Zhang, Kent R Bailey, Kristian M Bailey, Florianne Bauer, Jolanda M A Boer, Peter S Braund, Amber Burt, Paul R Burton, Sarah G Buxbaum, Wei Chen, Rhonda M Cooper-DeHoff, L Adrienne Cupples, Jonas S deJong, Christian Delles, David Duggan, Myriam Fornage, Clement E Furlong, Nicole Glazer, John G Gums, Claire Hastie, Michael V Holmes, Thomas Illig, Susan A Kirkland, Mika Kivimäki, Ronald Klein, Barbara E Klein, Charles Kooperberg, Kandice Kottke-Marchant, Meena Kumari, Andrea Z LaCroix, Laya Mallela, Gurunathan Murugesan, Jose Ordovas, Willem H Ouwehand, Wendy S Post, Richa Saxena, Hubert Scharnagl, Pamela J Schreiner, Tina Shah, Denis C Shields, Daichi Shimbo, Sathanur R Srinivasan, Ronald P Stolk, Daniel I Swerdlow, Herman A Taylor, Eric J Topol, Elina Toskala, Joost L van Pelt, Jessica van Setten, Salim Yusuf, John C Whittaker, A H Zwinderman, , Sonia S Anand, Anthony J Balmforth, Gerald S Berenson, Connie R Bezzina, Bernhard O Boehm, Eric Boerwinkle, Juan P Casas, Mark J Caulfield, Robert Clarke, John M Connell, Karen J Cruickshanks, Karina W Davidson, Ian N M Day, Paul I W de Bakker, Pieter A Doevendans, Anna F Dominiczak, Alistair S Hall, Catharina A Hartman, Christian Hengstenberg, Hans L Hillege, Marten H Hofker, Steve E Humphries, Gail P Jarvik, Julie A Johnson, Bernhard M Kaess, Sekar Kathiresan, Wolfgang Koenig, Debbie A Lawlor, Winfried März, Olle Melander, Braxton D Mitchell, Grant W Montgomery, Patricia B Munroe, Sarah S Murray, Stephen J Newhouse, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Neil Poulter, Bruce Psaty, Susan Redline, Stephen S Rich, Jerome I Rotter, Heribert Schunkert, Peter Sever, Alan R Shuldiner, Roy L Silverstein, Alice Stanton, Barbara Thorand, Mieke D Trip, Michael Y Tsai, Pim van der Harst, Ellen van der Schoot, Yvonne T van der Schouw, W M Monique Verschuren, Hugh Watkins, Arthur A M Wilde, Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel, John B Whitfield, G Kees Hovingh, Christie M Ballantyne, Cisca Wijmenga, Muredach P Reilly, Nicholas G Martin, James G Wilson, Daniel J Rader, Nilesh J Samani, Alex P Reiner, Robert A Hegele, John J P Kastelein, Aroon D Hingorani, Philippa J Talmud, Hakon Hakonarson, Clara C Elbers, Brendan J Keating, Fotios Drenos.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
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Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many SNPs underlying variations in plasma-lipid levels. We explore whether additional loci associated with plasma-lipid phenotypes, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), and triglycerides (TGs), can be identified by a dense gene-centric approach. Our meta-analysis of 32 studies in 66,240 individuals of European ancestry was based on the custom ?50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) covering ?2,000 candidate genes. SNP-lipid associations were replicated either in a cohort comprising an additional 24,736 samples or within the Global Lipid Genetic Consortium. We identified four, six, ten, and four unreported SNPs in established lipid genes for HDL-C, LDL-C, TC, and TGs, respectively. We also identified several lipid-related SNPs in previously unreported genes: DGAT2, HCAR2, GPIHBP1, PPARG, and FTO for HDL-C; SOCS3, APOH, SPTY2D1, BRCA2, and VLDLR for LDL-C; SOCS3, UGT1A1, BRCA2, UBE3B, FCGR2A, CHUK, and INSIG2 for TC; and SERPINF2, C4B, GCK, GATA4, INSR, and LPAL2 for TGs. The proportion of explained phenotypic variance in the subset of studies providing individual-level data was 9.9% for HDL-C, 9.5% for LDL-C, 10.3% for TC, and 8.0% for TGs. This large meta-analysis of lipid phenotypes with the use of a dense gene-centric approach identified multiple SNPs not previously described in established lipid genes and several previously unknown loci. The explained phenotypic variance from this approach was comparable to that from a meta-analysis of GWAS data, suggesting that a focused genotyping approach can further increase the understanding of heritability of plasma lipids.
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Genome-wide meta-analysis points to CTC1 and ZNF676 as genes regulating telomere homeostasis in humans.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
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Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is associated with a number of common age-related diseases and is a heritable trait. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) identified two loci on chromosomes 3q26.2 (TERC) and 10q24.33 (OBFC1) that are associated with the inter-individual LTL variation. We performed a meta-analysis of 9190 individuals from six independent GWAS and validated our findings in 2226 individuals from four additional studies. We confirmed previously reported associations with OBFC1 (rs9419958 P = 9.1 × 10(-11)) and with the telomerase RNA component TERC (rs1317082, P = 1.1 × 10(-8)). We also identified two novel genomic regions associated with LTL variation that map near a conserved telomere maintenance complex component 1 (CTC1; rs3027234, P = 3.6 × 10(-8)) on chromosome17p13.1 and zinc finger protein 676 (ZNF676; rs412658, P = 3.3 × 10(-8)) on 19p12. The minor allele of rs3027234 was associated with both shorter LTL and lower expression of CTC1. Our findings are consistent with the recent observations that point mutations in CTC1 cause short telomeres in both Arabidopsis and humans affected by a rare Mendelian syndrome. Overall, our results provide novel insights into the genetic architecture of inter-individual LTL variation in the general population.
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Evolutionary history and adaptation from high-coverage whole-genome sequences of diverse African hunter-gatherers.
Cell
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To reconstruct modern human evolutionary history and identify loci that have shaped hunter-gatherer adaptation, we sequenced the whole genomes of five individuals in each of three different hunter-gatherer populations at > 60× coverage: Pygmies from Cameroon and Khoesan-speaking Hadza and Sandawe from Tanzania. We identify 13.4 million variants, substantially increasing the set of known human variation. We found evidence of archaic introgression in all three populations, and the distribution of time to most recent common ancestors from these regions is similar to that observed for introgressed regions in Europeans. Additionally, we identify numerous loci that harbor signatures of local adaptation, including genes involved in immunity, metabolism, olfactory and taste perception, reproduction, and wound healing. Within the Pygmy population, we identify multiple highly differentiated loci that play a role in growth and anterior pituitary function and are associated with height.
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Plasma HDL cholesterol and risk of myocardial infarction: a mendelian randomisation study.
Benjamin F Voight, Gina M Peloso, Marju Orho-Melander, Ruth Frikke-Schmidt, Maja Barbalic, Majken K Jensen, George Hindy, Hilma Holm, Eric L Ding, Toby Johnson, Heribert Schunkert, Nilesh J Samani, Robert Clarke, Jemma C Hopewell, John F Thompson, Mingyao Li, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Kiran Musunuru, James P Pirruccello, Danish Saleheen, Li Chen, Alexandre F R Stewart, Arne Schillert, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Gudmundur Thorgeirsson, Sonia Anand, James C Engert, Thomas Morgan, John Spertus, Monika Stoll, Klaus Berger, Nicola Martinelli, Domenico Girelli, Pascal P McKeown, Christopher C Patterson, Stephen E Epstein, Joseph Devaney, Mary-Susan Burnett, Vincent Mooser, Samuli Ripatti, Ida Surakka, Markku S Nieminen, Juha Sinisalo, Marja-Liisa Lokki, Markus Perola, Aki Havulinna, Ulf de Faire, Bruna Gigante, Erik Ingelsson, Tanja Zeller, Philipp Wild, Paul I W de Bakker, Olaf H Klungel, Anke-Hilse Maitland-van der Zee, Bas J M Peters, Anthonius de Boer, Diederick E Grobbee, Pieter W Kamphuisen, Vera H M Deneer, Clara C Elbers, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Marten H Hofker, Cisca Wijmenga, W M Monique Verschuren, Jolanda M A Boer, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Asif Rasheed, Philippe Frossard, Serkalem Demissie, Cristen Willer, Ron Do, José M Ordovás, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Michael Boehnke, Karen L Mohlke, Mark J Daly, Candace Guiducci, Noel P Burtt, Aarti Surti, Elena González, Shaun Purcell, Stacey Gabriel, Jaume Marrugat, John Peden, Jeanette Erdmann, Patrick Diemert, Christina Willenborg, Inke R König, Marcus Fischer, Christian Hengstenberg, Andreas Ziegler, Ian Buysschaert, Diether Lambrechts, Frans Van de Werf, Keith A Fox, Nour Eddine El Mokhtari, Diana Rubin, Jürgen Schrezenmeir, Stefan Schreiber, Arne Schäfer, John Danesh, Stefan Blankenberg, Robert Roberts, Ruth McPherson, Hugh Watkins, Alistair S Hall, Kim Overvad, Eric Rimm, Eric Boerwinkle, Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen, L Adrienne Cupples, Muredach P Reilly, Olle Melander, Pier M Mannucci, Diego Ardissino, David Siscovick, Roberto Elosua, Kari Stefansson, Christopher J O'Donnell, Veikko Salomaa, Daniel J Rader, Leena Peltonen, Stephen M Schwartz, David Altshuler, Sekar Kathiresan.
Lancet
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High plasma HDL cholesterol is associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction, but whether this association is causal is unclear. Exploiting the fact that genotypes are randomly assigned at meiosis, are independent of non-genetic confounding, and are unmodified by disease processes, mendelian randomisation can be used to test the hypothesis that the association of a plasma biomarker with disease is causal.
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Common variants in the type 2 diabetes KCNQ1 gene are associated with impairments in insulin secretion during hyperglycaemic glucose clamp.
PLoS ONE
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Genome-wide association studies in Japanese populations recently identified common variants in the KCNQ1 gene to be associated with type 2 diabetes. We examined the association of these variants within KCNQ1 with type 2 diabetes in a Dutch population, investigated their effects on insulin secretion and metabolic traits and on the risk of developing complications in type 2 diabetes patients.
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Homocysteine and coronary heart disease: meta-analysis of MTHFR case-control studies, avoiding publication bias.
PLoS Med.
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Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) appreciably increases homocysteine levels, so "Mendelian randomization" studies using this variant as an instrumental variable could help test causality.
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Large-scale gene-centric meta-analysis across 39 studies identifies type 2 diabetes loci.
Richa Saxena, Clara C Elbers, Yiran Guo, Inga Peter, Tom R Gaunt, Jessica L Mega, Matthew B Lanktree, Archana Tare, Berta Almoguera Castillo, Yun R Li, Toby Johnson, Marcel Bruinenberg, Diane Gilbert-Diamond, Ramakrishnan Rajagopalan, Benjamin F Voight, Ashok Balasubramanyam, John Barnard, Florianne Bauer, Jens Baumert, Tushar Bhangale, Bernhard O Böhm, Peter S Braund, Paul R Burton, Hareesh R Chandrupatla, Robert Clarke, Rhonda M Cooper-DeHoff, Errol D Crook, George Davey-Smith, Ian N Day, Anthonius de Boer, Mark C H de Groot, Fotios Drenos, Jane Ferguson, Caroline S Fox, Clement E Furlong, Quince Gibson, Christian Gieger, Lisa A Gilhuijs-Pederson, Joseph T Glessner, Anuj Goel, Yan Gong, Struan F A Grant, Diederick E Grobbee, Claire Hastie, Steve E Humphries, Cecilia E Kim, Mika Kivimäki, Marcus Kleber, Christa Meisinger, Meena Kumari, Taimour Y Langaee, Debbie A Lawlor, Mingyao Li, Maximilian T Lobmeyer, Anke-Hilse Maitland-van der Zee, Matthijs F L Meijs, Cliona M Molony, David A Morrow, Gurunathan Murugesan, Solomon K Musani, Christopher P Nelson, Stephen J Newhouse, Jeffery R O'Connell, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Jutta Palmen, Sanjey R Patel, Carl J Pepine, Mary Pettinger, Thomas S Price, Suzanne Rafelt, Jane Ranchalis, Asif Rasheed, Elisabeth Rosenthal, Ingo Ruczinski, Sonia Shah, Haiqing Shen, Günther Silbernagel, Erin N Smith, Annemieke W M Spijkerman, Alice Stanton, Michael W Steffes, Barbara Thorand, Mieke Trip, Pim van der Harst, Daphne L van der A, Erik P A van Iperen, Jessica van Setten, Jana V van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Niek Verweij, Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel, Taylor Young, M Hadi Zafarmand, Joseph M Zmuda, , Michael Boehnke, David Altshuler, Mark McCarthy, W H Linda Kao, James S Pankow, Thomas P Cappola, Peter Sever, Neil Poulter, Mark Caulfield, Anna Dominiczak, Denis C Shields, Deepak L Bhatt, Deepak Bhatt, Li Zhang, Sean P Curtis, John Danesh, Juan P Casas, Yvonne T van der Schouw, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Pieter A Doevendans, Gerald W Dorn, Martin Farrall, Garret A FitzGerald, Anders Hamsten, Robert Hegele, Aroon D Hingorani, Marten H Hofker, Gordon S Huggins, Thomas Illig, Gail P Jarvik, Julie A Johnson, Olaf H Klungel, William C Knowler, Wolfgang Koenig, Winfried März, James B Meigs, Olle Melander, Patricia B Munroe, Braxton D Mitchell, Susan J Bielinski, Daniel J Rader, Muredach P Reilly, Stephen S Rich, Jerome I Rotter, Danish Saleheen, Nilesh J Samani, Eric E Schadt, Alan R Shuldiner, Roy Silverstein, Kandice Kottke-Marchant, Philippa J Talmud, Hugh Watkins, Folkert W Asselbergs, Folkert Asselbergs, Paul I W de Bakker, Jeanne McCaffery, Cisca Wijmenga, Marc S Sabatine, James G Wilson, Alex Reiner, Donald W Bowden, Hakon Hakonarson, David S Siscovick, Brendan J Keating.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
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To identify genetic factors contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D), we performed large-scale meta-analyses by using a custom ?50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) with ?2000 candidate genes in 39 multiethnic population-based studies, case-control studies, and clinical trials totaling 17,418 cases and 70,298 controls. First, meta-analysis of 25 studies comprising 14,073 cases and 57,489 controls of European descent confirmed eight established T2D loci at genome-wide significance. In silico follow-up analysis of putative association signals found in independent genome-wide association studies (including 8,130 cases and 38,987 controls) performed by the DIAGRAM consortium identified a T2D locus at genome-wide significance (GATAD2A/CILP2/PBX4; p = 5.7 × 10(-9)) and two loci exceeding study-wide significance (SREBF1, and TH/INS; p < 2.4 × 10(-6)). Second, meta-analyses of 1,986 cases and 7,695 controls from eight African-American studies identified study-wide-significant (p = 2.4 × 10(-7)) variants in HMGA2 and replicated variants in TCF7L2 (p = 5.1 × 10(-15)). Third, conditional analysis revealed multiple known and novel independent signals within five T2D-associated genes in samples of European ancestry and within HMGA2 in African-American samples. Fourth, a multiethnic meta-analysis of all 39 studies identified T2D-associated variants in BCL2 (p = 2.1 × 10(-8)). Finally, a composite genetic score of SNPs from new and established T2D signals was significantly associated with increased risk of diabetes in African-American, Hispanic, and Asian populations. In summary, large-scale meta-analysis involving a dense gene-centric approach has uncovered additional loci and variants that contribute to T2D risk and suggests substantial overlap of T2D association signals across multiple ethnic groups.
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