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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Effects of naltrexone sustained- release/bupropion sustained-release combination therapy on body weight and glycemic parameters in overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes.
Diabetes Care
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2013
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OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy and safety of 32 mg naltrexone sustained-release (SR)/360 mg bupropion SR (NB) in overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes with or without background oral antidiabetes drugs. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a 56-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which 505 patients received standardized lifestyle intervention and were randomized 2:1 to NB or placebo. Coprimary end points were percent weight change and achievement of ?5% weight loss. Secondary end points included achievement of HbA1c <7% (53 mmol/mol), achievement of weight loss ?10%, and change in HbA1c, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, and lipids. RESULTS In the modified intent-to-treat population (54% female, 80% Caucasian, and mean age 54 years, weight 106 kg, BMI 37 kg/m(2), and HbA1c 8.0% [64 mmol/mol]), NB resulted in significantly greater weight reduction (-5.0 vs. -1.8%; P < 0.001) and proportion of patients achieving ?5% weight loss (44.5 vs. 18.9%, P < 0.001) compared with placebo. NB also resulted in significantly greater HbA1c reduction (-0.6 vs. -0.1% [6.6 vs. 1.1 mmol/mol]; P < 0.001), percent of patients achieving HbA1c <7% (53 mmol/mol) (44.1 vs. 26.3%; P < 0.001), and improvement in triglycerides and HDL cholesterol compared with placebo. NB was associated with higher incidence of nausea (42.3 vs. 7.1%), constipation (17.7 vs. 7.1%), and vomiting (18.3 vs. 3.6%). No difference was observed between groups in the incidence of depression, suicidal ideation, or hypoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS NB therapy in overweight/obese patients with type 2 diabetes induced weight loss, which was associated with improvements in glycemic control and select cardiovascular risk factors and was generally well tolerated with a safety profile similar to that in patients without diabetes.
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Naltrexone/Bupropion combination therapy in overweight or obese patients with major depressive disorder: results of a pilot study.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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Objective: To evaluate the effect of 32-mg/d naltrexone sustained release and 360-mg/d bupropion sustained release (NB32) in overweight and obese patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: Twenty-five female patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of MDD, an Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report score > 26, and a body mass index ? 27 and ? 43 kg/m(2) received up to 24 weeks of open-label treatment with NB32 with dietary and behavioral counseling (data collection: March 2008-July 2009). The primary endpoint was change from baseline in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score at 12 weeks; secondary endpoints included MADRS total score at week 24, change in weight, and Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale responder status (CGI-I score ? 2) at weeks 12 and 24 (modified intent-to-treat [mITT]: patients with ? 1 postbaseline MADRS total score on study drug; N = 23). Results: MADRS scores showed significant reductions at weeks 12 and 24 (mITT-last observation carried forward [LOCF]: -13.1 ± 7.1 and -15.3 ± 8.1, respectively, P < .001 vs baseline for all). Mean ± SD weight loss was -4.0% ± 4.6% (mITT-LOCF) and -6.1% ± 4.7% (observed cases) at week 12 and -5.3% ± 6.5% (mITT-LOCF) and -9.2% ± 6.2% (observed cases) at week 24 (P < .001 vs baseline for all). By week 24, 95% of patients (mITT-LOCF) were responders (CGI-I score ? 2) and 70% were in remission (CGI-I score = 1). The safety/tolerability profile of NB32 was consistent with its individual components; the most common adverse events were nausea, constipation, headache, and insomnia, with no serious adverse events attributed to NB32. Conclusion: Twenty-four weeks of open-label NB32 therapy with dietary and behavioral counseling was associated with improvement in depressive symptoms and reduced body weight in overweight/obese women with MDD. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00624858.
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A randomized, phase 3 trial of naltrexone SR/bupropion SR on weight and obesity-related risk factors (COR-II).
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2013
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To examine the effects of naltrexone/bupropion (NB) combination therapy on weight and weight-related risk factors in overweight and obese participants.
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Enhanced weight loss following coadministration of pramlintide with sibutramine or phentermine in a multicenter trial.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2010
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Preclinical evidence suggests that pharmacotherapy for obesity using combinations of agents targeted at distinct regulatory pathways may produce robust additive or synergistic effects on weight loss. This randomized placebo-controlled trial examined the safety and efficacy of the amylin analogue pramlintide alone or in combination with either phentermine or sibutramine. All patients also received lifestyle intervention. Following a 1-week placebo lead-in, 244 obese or overweight, nondiabetic subjects (88% female; 41 +/- 11 years; BMI 37.7 +/- 5.4 kg/m(2); weight 103 +/- 19 kg; mean +/- s.d.) received placebo subcutaneously (sc) t.i.d., pramlintide sc (120 microg t.i.d.), pramlintide sc (120 microg t.i.d.) + oral sibutramine (10 mg q.a.m.), or pramlintide sc (120 microg t.i.d.) + oral phentermine (37.5 mg q.a.m.) for 24 weeks. Treatment was single-blind for subjects receiving subcutaneous medication only and open-label for subjects in the combination arms. Weight loss achieved at week 24 with either combination treatment was greater than with pramlintide alone or placebo (P < 0.001; 11.1 +/- 1.1% with pramlintide + sibutramine, 11.3 +/- 0.9% with pramlintide + phentermine, -3.7 +/- 0.7% with pramlintide; -2.2 +/- 0.7% with placebo; mean +/- s.e.). Elevations from baseline in heart rate and diastolic blood pressure were demonstrated with both pramlintide + sibutramine (3.1 +/- 1.2 beats/min, P < 0.05; 2.7 +/- 0.9 mm Hg, P < 0.01) and pramlintide + phentermine (4.5 +/- 1.3 beats/min, P < 0.01; 3.5 +/- 1.2 mm Hg, P < 0.001) using 24-h ambulatory monitoring. However, the majority of subjects receiving these treatments remained within normal blood pressure ranges. These results support the potential of pramlintide-containing combination treatments for obesity.
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A Staphylococcus aureus fitness test platform for mechanism-based profiling of antibacterial compounds.
Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2009
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The emergence of drug-resistant bacteria coupled with the limited discovery of novel chemical scaffolds and druggable targets inspires new approaches to antibiotic development. Here we describe a chemical genomics strategy based on 245 Staphylococcus aureus antisense RNA strains, each engineered for reduced expression of target genes essential for S. aureus growth. Attenuation of gene expression can sensitize cells to compounds that inhibit the activity of a gene product or associated process. Pools of strains grown competitively in the presence of bioactive compounds generate characteristic profiles of strain sensitivities reflecting compound mechanism of action. Here, we validate this approach with a structurally and mechanistically diverse set of reference antibiotics and, in the accompanying paper in this issue of Chemistry & Biology (Huber et al., 2009), demonstrate its use in the discovery of new cell wall inhibitors.
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Stromal platelet-derived growth factor receptor ? (PDGFR?) provides a therapeutic target independent of tumor cell PDGFR? expression in lung cancer xenografts.
Mol. Cancer Ther.
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In lung cancer, platelet-derived growth factor receptor ? (PDGFR?) is expressed frequently by tumor-associated stromal cells and by cancer cells in a subset of tumors. We sought to determine the effect of targeting stromal PDGFR? in preclinical lung tumor xenograft models (human tumor, mouse stroma). Effects of anti-human (IMC-3G3) and anti-mouse (1E10) PDGFR? monoclonal antibodies (mAb) on proliferation and PDGFR? signaling were evaluated in lung cancer cell lines and mouse fibroblasts. Therapy studies were conducted using established PDGFR?-positive H1703 cells and PDGFR?-negative Calu-6, H1993, and A549 subcutaneous tumors in immunocompromised mice treated with vehicle, anti-PDGFR? mAbs, chemotherapy, or combination therapy. Tumors were analyzed for growth and levels of growth factors. IMC-3G3 inhibited PDGFR? activation and the growth of H1703 cells in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, but had no effect on PDGFR?-negative cell lines or mouse fibroblasts. 1E10 inhibited growth and PDGFR? activation of mouse fibroblasts, but had no effect on human cancer cell lines in vitro. In vivo, 1E10-targeted inhibition of murine PDGFR? reduced tumor growth as single-agent therapy in Calu-6 cells and enhanced the effect of chemotherapy in xenografts derived from A549 cells. We also identified that low expression cancer cell expression of VEGF-A and elevated expression of PDGF-AA were associated with response to stromal PDGFR? targeting. We conclude that stromal PDGFR? inhibition represents a means for enhancing control of lung cancer growth in some cases, independent of tumor cell PDGFR? expression.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.