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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A peptide derived from the highly conserved protein GAPDH is involved in tissue protection by different antifungal strategies and epithelial immunomodulation.
J. Invest. Dermatol.
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Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has an important role not only in glycolysis but also in nonmetabolic processes, including transcription activation and apoptosis. We report the isolation of a human GAPDH (hGAPDH) (2-32) fragment peptide from human placental tissue exhibiting antimicrobial activity. The peptide was internalized by cells of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans and initiated a rapid apoptotic mechanism, leading to killing of the fungus. Killing was dose-dependent, with 10??g?ml (3.1??M) and 100??g?ml hGAPDH (2-32) depolarizing 45% and 90% of the fungal cells in a population, respectively. Experimental C. albicans infection induced epithelial hGAPDH (2-32) expression. Addition of the peptide significantly reduced the tissue damage as compared with untreated experimental infection. Secreted aspartic proteinase (Sap) activity of C. albicans was inhibited by the fragment at higher concentrations, with a median effective dose of 160?mg?l(-1) (50??M) for Sap1p and 200?mg?l(-1) (63??M) for Sap2p, whereas Sap3 was not inhibited at all. Interestingly, hGAPDH (2-32) induced significant epithelial IL-8 and GM-CSF secretion and stimulated Toll-like receptor 4 expression at low concentrations independently of the presence of C. albicans, without any toxic mucosal effects. In the future, the combination of different antifungal strategies, e.g., a conventional fungicidal with immunomodulatory effects and the inhibition of fungal virulence factors, might be a promising treatment option.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.