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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Multilocus sequence typing scheme versus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for typing Mycobacterium abscessus isolates.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2014
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Outbreaks of infections by rapidly growing mycobacteria following invasive procedures, such as ophthalmological, laparoscopic, arthroscopic, plastic, and cardiac surgeries, mesotherapy, and vaccination, have been detected in Brazil since 1998. Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae-Mycobacterium abscessus group have caused most of these outbreaks. As part of an epidemiological investigation, the isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In this project, we performed a large-scale comparison of PFGE profiles with the results of a recently developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for M. abscessus. Ninety-three isolates were analyzed, with 40 M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates, 47 M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates, and six isolates with no assigned subspecies. Forty-five isolates were obtained during five outbreaks, and 48 were sporadic isolates that were not associated with outbreaks. For MLST, seven housekeeping genes (argH, cya, glpK, gnd, murC, pta, and purH) were sequenced, and each isolate was assigned a sequence type (ST) from the combination of obtained alleles. The PFGE patterns of DraI-digested DNA were compared with the MLST results. All isolates were analyzable by both methods. Isolates from monoclonal outbreaks showed unique STs and indistinguishable or very similar PFGE patterns. Thirty-three STs and 49 unique PFGE patterns were identified among the 93 isolates. The Simpson's index of diversity values for MLST and PFGE were 0.69 and 0.93, respectively, for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and 0.96 and 0.97, respectively, for M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. In conclusion, the MLST scheme showed 100% typeability and grouped monoclonal outbreak isolates in agreement with PFGE, but it was less discriminative than PFGE for M. abscessus.
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Demonstration of plasmid-mediated drug resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2014
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Plasmid-mediated kanamycin resistance was detected in a strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii responsible for a nationwide epidemic of surgical infections in Brazil. The plasmid did not influence susceptibility to tobramycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, clarithromycin, or ciprofloxacin. Plasmid-mediated drug resistance has not been described so far in mycobacteria.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii INCQS 00594.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 11-09-2013
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An epidemic of surgical-site infections by a single strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii affected >1,700 patients in Brazil from 2004 to 2008. The genome of the epidemic prototype strain M. abscessus subsp. bolletii INCQS 00594, deposited in the collection of the National Institute for Health Quality Control (INCQS), was sequenced.
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The detection and sequencing of a broad-host-range conjugative IncP-1? plasmid in an epidemic strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2013
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An extended outbreak of mycobacterial surgical infections occurred in Brazil during 2004-2008. Most infections were caused by a single strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, which was characterized by a specific rpoB sequevar and two highly similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns differentiated by the presence of a ?50 kb band. The nature of this band was investigated.
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Diversity of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of Mycobacterium abscessus type 2 clinical isolates.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-17-2010
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An epidemic of infections by rapidly growing mycobacteria related to surgical procedures between 2004 and 2008 in Brazil was caused by a unique strain showing the Mycobacterium abscessus type 2 pattern when it was analyzed by the molecular method of PCR-restriction enzyme analysis of the hsp65 gene (PRA-hsp65). In order to investigate the diversity of M. abscessus type 2 clinical isolates and to assess whether this epidemic strain was present in specimens from nonsurgical patients, we studied 52 isolates from 38 patients showing this characteristic PRA-hsp65 pattern obtained between 2005 and 2009. All isolates were identified by sequencing of region V of the rpoB gene and typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using two restriction enzymes, DraI and AseI. Seven isolates obtained from sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and urine in three different Brazilian states showed rpoB sequences 100% similar to the rpoB sequence of epidemic strain INCQS 594 and PFGE patterns highly related to the patterns of isolates, evidencing the presence of the epidemic strain in isolates from patients not associated with the surgical epidemic. The remaining isolates showed diverse rpoB sequences, with the highest similarities being to the corresponding sequences of M. massiliense(T) CIP 108297 (21 isolates), M. bolletii(T) CIP 108541 (19 isolates), or M. abscessus(T) ATCC 19977 (5 isolates). Two additional clusters could be detected by PFGE. PFGE showed 100% typeability and reproducibility and discriminatory powers, calculated by Simpsons index of diversity, of 0.978 (DraI) and 0.986 (AseI), confirming its suitability for the discrimination of M. abscessus type 2 isolates.
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Rapid tests for the detection of the Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii strain responsible for an epidemic of surgical-site infections in Brazil.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz
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A single strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, characterised by a particular rpoB sequevar and two highly related pulsed field gel electrophoresis patterns has been responsible for a nationwide outbreak of surgical infections in Brazil since 2004. In this study, we developed molecular tests based on polymerase chain reaction restriction-enzyme analysis (PRA) and sequencing for the rapid identification of this strain. Sequences of 15 DNA regions conserved in mycobacteria were retrieved from GenBank or sequenced and analysed in silico. Single nucleotide polymorphisms specific to the epidemic strain and located in enzyme recognition sites were detected in rpoB, the 3 region of the 16S rDNA and gyrB. The three tests that were developed, i.e., PRA-rpoB, PRA-16S and gyrB sequence analysis, showed 100%, 100% and 92.31% sensitivity and 93.06%, 90.28% and 100% specificity, respectively, for the discrimination of the surgical strain from other M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates, including 116 isolates from 95 patients, one environmental isolate and two type strains. The results of the three tests were stable, as shown by results obtained for different isolates from the same patient. In conclusion, due to the clinical and epidemiological importance of this strain, these tests could be implemented in reference laboratories for the rapid preliminary diagnosis and epidemiological surveillance of this epidemic strain.
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First description of natural and experimental conjugation between Mycobacteria mediated by a linear plasmid.
PLoS ONE
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In a previous study, we detected the presence of a Mycobacterium avium species-specific insertion sequence, IS1245, in Mycobacterium kansasii. Both species were isolated from a mixed M. avium-M. kansasii bone marrow culture from an HIV-positive patient. The transfer mechanism of this insertion sequence to M. kansasii was investigated here.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.