JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Environmental factors and multiple sclerosis severity: a descriptive study.
Int J Environ Res Public Health
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Growing evidence suggests that environmental factors play a key role in the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS). This study was conducted to examine whether environmental factors may also be associated with the evolution of the disease. We collected data on smoking habits, sunlight exposure and diet (particularly consumption of vitamin D-rich foods) from a sample of 131 MS patients. We also measured their serum vitamin D concentration. The clinical impact of MS was quantified using the Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS); MS was considered "severe" in patients with MSSS ? 6, and "mild" in patients with MSSS ? 1. The results showed a strong association between serum vitamin D concentration and both sunlight exposure (26.4 ± 11.9 ng/mL vs. 16.5 ± 12.1 ng/mL, p = 0.0004) and a fish-rich diet (23.5 ± 12.1 ng/mL vs. 16.1 ± 12.4 ng/mL, p = 0.005). Patients reporting frequent sunlight exposure had a lower MSSS (2.6 ± 2.4 h vs. 4.6 ± 2.6 h, p < 0.001). The mild MS patients reported much more frequent sunlight exposure (75% mild MS vs. 25% severe MS p = 0.004, Chi square test). A higher serum vitamin D concentration determined a lower risk of developing severe MS, adjusted for sunlight exposure (OR = 0.92 for one unit increase in vitamin D, 95% CI: 0.86-0.97, p = 0.005). A stronger inverse association emerged between frequent sunlight exposure and the risk of severe MS (OR = 0.26, 95% CI: 0.09-0.71, p = 0.009). Our data show that an appropriate diet and adequate expose to sunlight are associated with less aggressive MS.
Related JoVE Video
Assessing executive function with the D-KEFS sorting test: normative data for a sample of the Italian adult population.
Neurol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
One of the major problems in clinical neuropsychology is to apply ecological, easily administrable and sensitive tests that can help in the diagnosis of executive functions. In the present paper we present normative values for the D-KEFS sorting test (ST), exploring the ability of reasoning, categorization abilities, problem solving, flexibility of thinking and abstraction. We collected normative data in a group of 181 normal Italian subjects aged between 20 and 69 years old, matched for educational level. Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate the potential effects of age, sex and education. Age and education had a significant effect on ST performance. Our study provided normative data for the D-KEFS ST for the adult Italian population, corrections of raw scores for relevant demographic factors, and percentile grids for both baseline data and on re-testing after 9 months of follow-up. These normative Italian values support the use of the D-KEFS ST as a valid instrument for initial neuropsychological evaluation and longitudinal analysis of executive functions in clinical practice and for research purposes.
Related JoVE Video
Are Hsp70 protein expression and genetic polymorphism implicated in multiple sclerosis inflammation?
J. Neuroimmunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Genetic and environmental factors contribute to disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS) susceptibility, the most prevalent neurological pathology affecting young individuals in Western countries. We focused our attention on HSP70-2, an inducible chaperon induced under stress conditions. Genotype analysis of HSP70-2 (+1267 A/G) polymorphism revealed a significant association between the minor allele G and presence of MS (OR:1.31, 95% CI: 1.02-1.69, P = 0.039). In addition, Hsp70-2 protein content in vitro from PBMC was significantly lower in MS patients with GG genotype compared to AA genotype, indicating an implication of the G allele of HSP70-2 gene polymorphism in the development of MS.
Related JoVE Video
Alcohol consumption, helmet use and head trauma in cycling collisions in Germany.
Accid Anal Prev
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cycling, being easy, inexpensive and healthy, is becoming one of the most popular means of transport. Cyclists, however, are among the most vulnerable road users in traffic collisions. The aims of this study were to establish which cyclist and cycling accident characteristics are associated with alcohol consumption and helmet use in Germany and to identify risk factors related to head trauma sustained in cycling accidents. The source used for the present analysis was the database of the German in-depth accident study (GIDAS). All cyclists who had been involved in a road accident between 2000 and 2010 and submitted to an alcohol test were selected. Logistic regression analyses were carried out to evaluate various aspects: alcohol consumption, helmet use, head trauma, and cyclist/accident characteristics. Female riders were less likely to have consumed alcohol (OR=0.23, 95% CI: 0.08-0.66); cyclists who did not wear a helmet were more likely to have consumed alcohol (OR=2.41, 95% CI: 1.08-5.38); cyclists who were not responsible for the collision were less likely to have consumed alcohol than those who were partially responsible for the accident (OR=0.22, 95% CI: 0.08-0.61). Cyclists involved in collisions with another vehicle, motorised or not, had a lower risk of suffering a head injury compared with those involved in single-vehicle accidents (OR=0.27, 95% CI: 0.12-0.62, and OR=0.08, 95% CI: 0.03-0.22, respectively). The prevention or limiting of alcohol consumption among cyclists and the corresponding testing of cyclists must be improved. Training initiatives on helmet protection should be encouraged.
Related JoVE Video
Detection of clinical relapses in multiple sclerosis cohorts: construction and validation of a model based on administrative data.
Neurol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the main cause of chronic disability in young people during their most productive years of life and therefore carries a high social and economic burden. The present study aimed to: (1) verify the capacity of an administrative data source to furnish data for constructing a model able to detect the occurrence of clinical relapses in MS patients and (2) validate the constructed theoretical model on a set of real-world data. Two MS experts identified some administrative variables as proxies of clinical relapses. Thereafter, the two MS experts analysed 889 events in 100 MS patients, considering only the administrative data relating to these patients, while a third neurologist independently analysed the real-world data (documented medical history) of the same patients in the same period. Absolute concordance between the theoretical model and the real-world data was found in 86 % of the events. The model we propose is easily and rapidly applicable, requiring the collection of just a few variables that are already present in local health authority administrative databases in Italy. It can be used to estimate, with a good level of reliability, the occurrence of relapses in various settings. Moreover, the model is also exportable to different and larger MS cohorts and could be useful for healthcare planning and for evaluating the efficacy of drugs in the real-world, thus favouring better resource allocation and management.
Related JoVE Video
Postinfectious neurologic syndromes: a prospective cohort study.
Neurology
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Postinfectious neurologic syndromes (PINSs) of the CNS include heterogeneous disorders, sometimes relapsing. In this study, we aimed to a) describe the spectrum of PINSs; b) define predictors of outcome in PINSs; and c) assess the clinical/paraclinical features that help differentiate PINSs from multiple sclerosis (MS).
Related JoVE Video
Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis in south-western Sardinia.
Mult. Scler.
PUBLISHED: 06-07-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Sardinia is a known high-risk area for multiple sclerosis (MS), but no data for south-western Sardinia (SWS) are available. SWS has a genetically homogeneous population, apart from St Peter Island, and represents a peculiar environment related to the industrial, mineralogical and military economy.
Related JoVE Video
Recovering incidence from repeated measures of prevalence: the case of urinary tract infections.
J Clin Monit Comput
PUBLISHED: 05-19-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To study the relationships between prevalence and incidence in the case of nosocomial infections of the urinary tract, and to evaluate if repeated prevalence measures may be useful to obtain an estimate of incidence.
Related JoVE Video
Prevalence estimates of alcohol related problems in an area of northern Italy using the capture-recapture method.
Eur J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 04-12-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The alcohol-related problems (ARPs) are a relevant issue in public health and contribute to premature deaths and avoidable disease burden. The capture-recapture (C-R) method can be a useful tool to provide reliable estimates for populations with hidden nature such as subjects with ARP.
Related JoVE Video
Melanoma in multiple sclerosis treated with natalizumab: causal association or coincidence?
Mult. Scler.
PUBLISHED: 12-19-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We report a relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patient who received monthly intravenous natalizumab. After the fifth dose, the patient had a change in a long-standing mole. Ten months later, the mole became ulcerative and was ablated. Histological examination identified a spreading melanoma reaching the lower dermis (Clark level IV). Considering that at the moment the incidence of melanoma is estimable as about 5 per 100,000 multiple sclerosis person-years treated with natalizumab, and that, in the general population, the incidence of melanoma per 100,000 person-years is more than 10, we may speculate that the occurrence of melanoma during natalizumab treatment in multiple sclerosis is purely a coincidence.
Related JoVE Video
Complete stable remission and autoantibody specificity in myasthenia gravis.
Neurology
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) are subgrouped as acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-positive, muscle-specific kinase (MuSK)-positive, and AChR/MuSK-negative MG (or double negative [DN]) on the basis of autoantibody assay. We investigated the relationships between autoantibody specificity, main clinical features, and outcome of the disease, in particular the occurrence of complete stable remission (CSR), by means of a retrospective study on a cohort of 677 Italian patients with MG.
Related JoVE Video
Clinical and molecular cross-sectional study of a cohort of adult type III spinal muscular atrophy patients: clues from a biomarker study.
Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations of the SMN1 gene. Based on severity, three forms of SMA are recognized (types I-III). All patients usually have 2-4 copies of a highly homologous gene (SMN2), which produces insufficient levels of functional survival motor neuron (SMN) protein due to the alternative splicing of exon 7. The availability of potential candidates to the treatment of SMA has raised a number of issues, including the availability of biomarkers. This study was aimed at evaluating whether the quantification of SMN2 products in peripheral blood is a suitable biomarker for SMA. Forty-five adult type III patients were evaluated by Manual Muscle Testing, North Star Ambulatory Assessment scale, 6-min walk test, myometry, forced vital capacity, and dual X-ray absorptiometry. Molecular assessments included SMN2 copy number, levels of full-length SMN2 (SMN2-fl) transcripts and those lacking exon 7 and SMN protein. Clinical outcome measures strongly correlated to each other. Lean body mass correlated inversely with years from diagnosis and with several aspects of motor performance. SMN2 copy number and SMN protein levels were not associated with motor performance or transcript levels. SMN2-fl levels correlated with motor performance in ambulant patients. Our results indicate that SMN2-fl levels correlate with motor performance only in patients preserving higher levels of motor function, whereas motor performance was strongly influenced by disease duration and lean body mass. If not taken into account, the confounding effect of disease duration may impair the identification of potential SMA biomarkers.
Related JoVE Video
Epidemiology and geographical variation of myasthenia gravis in the province of Pavia, Italy.
Neuroepidemiology
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Previous studies have reported a prevalence estimate of myasthenia gravis (MG) from 7.7 to 11.1 per 100,000 inhabitants in Europe. Moreover, the study of the geographical distribution of MG should be useful to generate specific hypotheses. The aims are to estimate MG prevalence and to investigate its geographical variation in a delimited area in Northern Italy.
Related JoVE Video
Is a neutral head position safer than 45-degree neck rotation during ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein cannulation? Results of a randomized controlled clinical trial.
Anesth. Analg.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The optimal degree of neck rotation during internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulation remains undetermined because previous studies suggested using sonography, but without puncturing the vein. We assessed whether a neutral position (NP) of the head (0 degrees) during ultrasound-guided cannulation of the IJV was safer than rotating the neck to 45 degrees head turned. The effect of these 2 positions during ultrasound-guided cannulation on major complications was the primary outcome. Overall complications, venous access time, and perception of difficulty during the procedure were also evaluated.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.