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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Independent components of neural activity carry information on individual populations.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2014
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Local field potential (LFP), the low-frequency part of the potential recorded extracellularly in the brain, reflects neural activity at the population level. The interpretation of LFP is complicated because it can mix activity from remote cells, on the order of millimeters from the electrode. To understand better the relation between the recordings and the local activity of cells we used a large-scale network thalamocortical model to compute simultaneous LFP, transmembrane currents, and spiking activity. We used this model to study the information contained in independent components obtained from the reconstructed Current Source Density (CSD), which smooths transmembrane currents, decomposed further with Independent Component Analysis (ICA). We found that the three most robust components matched well the activity of two dominating cell populations: superior pyramidal cells in layer 2/3 (rhythmic spiking) and tufted pyramids from layer 5 (intrinsically bursting). The pyramidal population from layer 2/3 could not be well described as a product of spatial profile and temporal activation, but by a sum of two such products which we recovered in two of the ICA components in our analysis, which correspond to the two first principal components of PCA decomposition of layer 2/3 population activity. At low noise one more cell population could be discerned but it is unlikely that it could be recovered in experiment given typical noise ranges.
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Reward learning requires activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in the central amygdala.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2013
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Learning how to avoid danger and pursue reward depends on negative emotions motivating aversive learning and positive emotions motivating appetitive learning. The amygdala is a key component of the brain emotional system; however, an understanding of how various emotions are differentially processed in the amygdala has yet to be achieved. We report that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, extracellularly operating enzyme) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is crucial for appetitive, but not for aversive, learning in mice. The knock-out of MMP-9 impairs appetitively motivated conditioning, but not an aversive one. MMP-9 is present at the excitatory synapses in the CeA with its activity greatly enhanced after the appetitive training. Finally, blocking extracellular MMP-9 activity with its inhibitor TIMP-1 provides evidence that local MMP-9 activity in the CeA is crucial for the appetitive, but not for aversive, learning.
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3D brain atlas reconstructor service--online repository of three-dimensional models of brain structures.
Neuroinformatics
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2013
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Brain atlases are important tools of neuroscience. Traditionally prepared in paper book format, more and more commonly they take digital form which extends their utility. To simplify work with different atlases, to lay the ground for developing universal tools which could abstract from the origin of the atlas, efforts are being made to provide common interfaces to these atlases. 3D Brain Atlas Reconstructor service (3dBARs) described here is a repository of digital representations of different brain atlases in CAF format which we recently proposed and a repository of 3D models of brain structures. A graphical front-end is provided for creating and viewing the reconstructed models as well as the underlying 2D atlas data. An application programming interface (API) facilitates programmatic access to the service contents from other websites. From a typical users point of view, 3dBARs offers an accessible way to mine publicly available atlasing data with a convenient browser based interface, without the need to install extra software. For a developer of services related to brain atlases, 3dBARs supplies mechanisms for enhancing functionality of other software. The policy of the service is to accept new datasets as delivered by interested parties and we work with the researchers who obtain original data to make them available to the neuroscience community at large. The functionality offered by the 3dBARs situates it at the core of present and future general atlasing services tying it strongly to the global atlasing neuroinformatics infrastructure.
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Kernel current source density method.
Neural Comput
PUBLISHED: 11-17-2011
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Local field potentials (LFP), the low-frequency part of extracellular electrical recordings, are a measure of the neural activity reflecting dendritic processing of synaptic inputs to neuronal populations. To localize synaptic dynamics, it is convenient, whenever possible, to estimate the density of transmembrane current sources (CSD) generating the LFP. In this work, we propose a new framework, the kernel current source density method (kCSD), for nonparametric estimation of CSD from LFP recorded from arbitrarily distributed electrodes using kernel methods. We test specific implementations of this framework on model data measured with one-, two-, and three-dimensional multielectrode setups. We compare these methods with the traditional approach through numerical approximation of the Laplacian and with the recently developed inverse current source density methods (iCSD). We show that iCSD is a special case of kCSD. The proposed method opens up new experimental possibilities for CSD analysis from existing or new recordings on arbitrarily distributed electrodes (not necessarily on a grid), which can be obtained in extracellular recordings of single unit activity with multiple electrodes.
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Inverse current source density method in two dimensions: inferring neural activation from multielectrode recordings.
Neuroinformatics
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2011
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The recent development of large multielectrode recording arrays has made it affordable for an increasing number of laboratories to record from multiple brain regions simultaneously. The development of analytical tools for array data, however, lags behind these technological advances in hardware. In this paper, we present a method based on forward modeling for estimating current source density from electrophysiological signals recorded on a two-dimensional grid using multi-electrode rectangular arrays. This new method, which we call two-dimensional inverse Current Source Density (iCSD 2D), is based upon and extends our previous one- and three-dimensional techniques. We test several variants of our method, both on surrogate data generated from a collection of Gaussian sources, and on model data from a population of layer 5 neocortical pyramidal neurons. We also apply the method to experimental data from the rat subiculum. The main advantages of the proposed method are the explicit specification of its assumptions, the possibility to include system-specific information as it becomes available, the ability to estimate CSD at the grid boundaries, and lower reconstruction errors when compared to the traditional approach. These features make iCSD 2D a substantial improvement over the approaches used so far and a powerful new tool for the analysis of multielectrode array data. We also provide a free GUI-based MATLAB toolbox to analyze and visualize our test data as well as user datasets.
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Cognitive abilities of Alzheimers disease transgenic mice are modulated by social context and circadian rhythm.
Curr Alzheimer Res
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2011
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In the present study, we used a new training paradigm in the intelliCage automatic behavioral assessment system to investigate cognitive functions of the transgenic mice harboring London mutation of the human amyloid precursor protein (APP.V717I). Three groups of animals: 5-, 12- and 18-24-month old were subjected to both Water Maze training and the IntelliCage-based appetitive conditioning. The spatial memory deficit was observed in all three groups of transgenic mice in both behavioral paradigms. However, the APP mice were capable to learn normally when co-housed with the wild-type (WT) littermates, in contrast to clearly impaired learning observed when the transgenic mice were housed alone. Furthermore, in the transgenic mice kept in the Intellicage alone, the cognitive deficit of the young animals was modulated by the circadian rhythm, namely was prominent only during the active phase of the day. The novel approach to study the transgenic mice cognitive abilities presented in this paper offers new insight into cognitive dysfunctions of the Alzheimers disease mouse model.
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Differential effects produced by ketamine on oscillatory activity recorded in the rat hippocampus, dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens.
J. Psychopharmacol. (Oxford)
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2010
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Previously, we showed that NMDA antagonists enhance high-frequency oscillations (130-180?Hz) in the nucleus accumbens. However, whether NMDA antagonists can enhance high-frequency oscillations in other brain regions remains unclear. Here, we used monopolar, bipolar and inverse current source density techniques to examine oscillatory activity in the hippocampus, a region known to generate spontaneous ripples (?200?Hz), its surrounding tissue, and the dorsal striatum, neuroanatomically related to the nucleus accumbens. In monopolar recordings, ketamine-induced increases in the power of high-frequency oscillations were detected in all structures, although the power was always substantially larger in the nucleus accumbens. In bipolar recordings, considered to remove common-mode input, high-frequency oscillations associated with ketamine injection were not present in the regions we investigated outside the nucleus accumbens. In line with this, inverse current source density showed the greatest changes in current to occur in the vicinity of the nucleus accumbens and a monopolar structure of the generator. We found little spatial localisation of ketamine high-frequency oscillations in other areas. In contrast, sharp-wave ripples, which were well localized to the hippocampus, occurred less frequently after ketamine. Notably, we also found ketamine produced small, but significant, changes in the power of 30-90?Hz gamma oscillations (an increase in the hippocampus and a decrease in the nucleus accumbens).
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Variability of visual responses of superior colliculus neurons depends on stimulus velocity.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2010
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Visually responding neurons in the superficial, retinorecipient layers of the cat superior colliculus receive input from two primarily parallel information processing channels, Y and W, which is reflected in their velocity response profiles. We quantified the time-dependent variability of responses of these neurons to stimuli moving with different velocities by Fano factor (FF) calculated in discrete time windows. The FF for cells responding to low-velocity stimuli, thus receiving W inputs, increased with the increase in the firing rate. In contrast, the dynamics of activity of the cells responding to fast moving stimuli, processed by Y pathway, correlated negatively with FF whether the response was excitatory or suppressive. These observations were tested against several types of surrogate data. Whereas Poisson description failed to reproduce the variability of all collicular responses, the inclusion of secondary structure to the generating point process recovered most of the observed features of responses to fast moving stimuli. Neither model could reproduce the variability of low-velocity responses, which suggests that, in this case, more complex time dependencies need to be taken into account. Our results indicate that Y and W channels may differ in reliability of responses to visual stimulation. Apart from previously reported morphological and physiological differences of the cells belonging to Y and W channels, this is a new feature distinguishing these two pathways.
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Extracting functional components of neural dynamics with Independent Component Analysis and inverse Current Source Density.
J Comput Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2009
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Local field potentials have good temporal resolution but are blurred due to the slow spatial decay of the electric field. For simultaneous recordings on regular grids one can reconstruct efficiently the current sources (CSD) using the inverse Current Source Density method (iCSD). It is possible to decompose the resultant spatiotemporal information about the current dynamics into functional components using Independent Component Analysis (ICA). We show on test data modeling recordings of evoked potentials on a grid of 4 × 5 × 7 points that meaningful results are obtained with spatial ICA decomposition of reconstructed CSD. The components obtained through decomposition of CSD are better defined and allow easier physiological interpretation than the results of similar analysis of corresponding evoked potentials in the thalamus. We show that spatiotemporal ICA decompositions can perform better for certain types of sources but it does not seem to be the case for the experimental data studied. Having found the appropriate approach to decomposing neural dynamics into functional components we use the technique to study the somatosensory evoked potentials recorded on a grid spanning a large part of the forebrain. We discuss two example components associated with the first waves of activation of the somatosensory thalamus. We show that the proposed method brings up new, more detailed information on the time and spatial location of specific activity conveyed through various parts of the somatosensory thalamus in the rat.
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Direct estimation of inhomogeneous Markov interval models of spike trains.
Neural Comput
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2009
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A necessary ingredient for a quantitative theory of neural coding is appropriate "spike kinematics": a precise description of spike trains. While summarizing experiments by complete spike time collections is clearly inefficient and probably unnecessary, the most common probabilistic model used in neurophysiology, the inhomogeneous Poisson process, often seems too crude. Recently a more general model, the inhomogeneous Markov interval model (Berry & Meister, 1998 ; Kass & Ventura, 2001 ), was considered, which takes into account both the current experimental time and the time from the last spike. Several techniques were proposed to estimate the parameters of these models from data. Here we propose a direct method of estimation that is easy to implement, fast, and conceptually simple. The method is illustrated with an analysis of sample data from the cats superior colliculus.
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Reciprocal inhibition and slow calcium decay in perigeniculate interneurons explain changes of spontaneous firing of thalamic cells caused by cortical inactivation.
J Comput Neurosci
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The role of cortical feedback in the thalamocortical processing loop has been extensively investigated over the last decades. With an exception of several cases, these searches focused on the cortical feedback exerted onto thalamo-cortical relay (TC) cells of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). In a previous, physiological study, we showed in the cat visual system that cessation of cortical input, despite decrease of spontaneous activity of TC cells, increased spontaneous firing of their recurrent inhibitory interneurons located in the perigeniculate nucleus (PGN). To identify mechanisms underlying such functional changes we conducted a modeling study in NEURON on several networks of point neurons with varied model parameters, such as membrane properties, synaptic weights and axonal delays. We considered six network topologies of the retino-geniculo-cortical system. All models were robust against changes of axonal delays except for the delay between the LGN feed-forward interneuron and the TC cell. The best representation of physiological results was obtained with models containing reciprocally connected PGN cells driven by the cortex and with relatively slow decay of intracellular calcium. This strongly indicates that the thalamic reticular nucleus plays an essential role in the cortical influence over thalamo-cortical relay cells while the thalamic feed-forward interneurons are not essential in this process. Further, we suggest that the dependence of the activity of PGN cells on the rate of calcium removal can be one of the key factors determining individual cell response to elimination of cortical input.
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Common atlas format and 3D brain atlas reconstructor: infrastructure for constructing 3D brain atlases.
Neuroinformatics
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One of the challenges of modern neuroscience is integrating voluminous data of diferent modalities derived from a variety of specimens. This task requires a common spatial framework that can be provided by brain atlases. The first atlases were limited to two-dimentional presentation of structural data. Recently, attempts at creating 3D atlases have been made to offer navigation within non-standard anatomical planes and improve capability of localization of different types of data within the brain volume. The 3D atlases available so far have been created using frameworks which make it difficult for other researchers to replicate the results. To facilitate reproducible research and data sharing in the field we propose an SVG-based Common Atlas Format (CAF) to store 2D atlas delineations or other compatible data and 3D Brain Atlas Reconstructor (3dBAR), software dedicated to automated reconstruction of three-dimensional brain structures from 2D atlas data. The basic functionality is provided by (1) a set of parsers which translate various atlases from a number of formats into the CAF, and (2) a module generating 3D models from CAF datasets. The whole reconstruction process is reproducible and can easily be configured, tracked and reviewed, which facilitates fixing errors. Manual corrections can be made when automatic reconstruction is not sufficient. The software was designed to simplify interoperability with other neuroinformatics tools by using open file formats. The content can easily be exchanged at any stage of data processing. The framework allows for the addition of new public or proprietary content.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.