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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Discovering functional DNA elements using population genomic information: a proof of concept using human mtDNA.
Genome Biol Evol
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2014
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Identifying the complete set of functional elements within the human genome would be a windfall for multiple areas of biological research including medicine, molecular biology, and evolution. Complete knowledge of function would aid in the prioritization of loci when searching for the genetic bases of disease or adaptive phenotypes. Because mutations that disrupt function are disfavored by natural selection, purifying selection leaves a detectable signature within functional elements; accordingly, this signal has been exploited for over a decade through the use of genomic comparisons of distantly related species. While this is so, the functional complement of the genome changes extensively across time and between lineages; therefore, evidence of the current action of purifying selection in humans is essential. Because the removal of deleterious mutations by natural selection also reduces within-species genetic diversity within functional loci, dense population genetic data have the potential to reveal genomic elements that are currently functional. Here, we assess the potential of this approach by examining an ultradeep sample of human mitochondrial genomes (n = 16,411). We show that the high density of polymorphism in this data set precisely delineates regions experiencing purifying selection. Furthermore, we show that the number of segregating alleles at a site is strongly correlated with its divergence across species after accounting for known mutational biases in human mitochondrial DNA (? = 0.51; P < 2.2 × 10(-16)). These two measures track one another at a remarkably fine scale across many loci-a correlation that is purely the result of natural selection. Our results demonstrate that genetic variation has the potential to reveal with surprising precision which regions in the genome are currently performing important functions and likely to have deleterious fitness effects when mutated. As more complete human genomes are sequenced, similar power to reveal purifying selection may be achievable in the human nuclear genome.
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Rates and genomic consequences of spontaneous mutational events in Drosophila melanogaster.
Genetics
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2013
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Because spontaneous mutation is the source of all genetic diversity, measuring mutation rates can reveal how natural selection drives patterns of variation within and between species. We sequenced eight genomes produced by a mutation-accumulation experiment in Drosophila melanogaster. Our analysis reveals that point mutation and small indel rates vary significantly between the two different genetic backgrounds examined. We also find evidence that ?2% of mutational events affect multiple closely spaced nucleotides. Unlike previous similar experiments, we were able to estimate genome-wide rates of large deletions and tandem duplications. These results suggest that, at least in inbred lines like those examined here, mutational pressures may result in net growth rather than contraction of the Drosophila genome. By comparing our mutation rate estimates to polymorphism data, we are able to estimate the fraction of new mutations that are eliminated by purifying selection. These results suggest that ?99% of duplications and deletions are deleterious--making them 10 times more likely to be removed by selection than nonsynonymous mutations. Our results illuminate not only the rates of new small- and large-scale mutations, but also the selective forces that they encounter once they arise.
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Detecting highly differentiated copy-number variants from pooled population sequencing.
Pac Symp Biocomput
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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Copy-number variants (CNVs) represent a functionally and evolutionarily important class of variation. Here we take advantage of the use of pooled sequencing to detect CNVs with large differences in allele frequency between population samples. We present a method for detecting CNVs in pooled population samples using a combination of paired-end sequences and read-depth. Highly differentiated CNVs show large differences in the number of paired-end reads supporting individual alleles and large differences in readdepth between population samples. We complement this approach with one that uses a hidden Markov model to find larger regions differing in read-depth between samples. Using novel pooled sequence data from two populations of Drosophila melanogaster along a latitudinal cline, we demonstrate the utility of our method for identifying CNVs involved in local adaptation.
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Gene copy-number polymorphism caused by retrotransposition in humans.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2013
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The era of whole-genome sequencing has revealed that gene copy-number changes caused by duplication and deletion events have important evolutionary, functional, and phenotypic consequences. Recent studies have therefore focused on revealing the extent of variation in copy-number within natural populations of humans and other species. These studies have found a large number of copy-number variants (CNVs) in humans, many of which have been shown to have clinical or evolutionary importance. For the most part, these studies have failed to detect an important class of gene copy-number polymorphism: gene duplications caused by retrotransposition, which result in a new intron-less copy of the parental gene being inserted into a random location in the genome. Here we describe a computational approach leveraging next-generation sequence data to detect gene copy-number variants caused by retrotransposition (retroCNVs), and we report the first genome-wide analysis of these variants in humans. We find that retroCNVs account for a substantial fraction of gene copy-number differences between any two individuals. Moreover, we show that these variants may often result in expressed chimeric transcripts, underscoring their potential for the evolution of novel gene functions. By locating the insertion sites of these duplicates, we are able to show that retroCNVs have had an important role in recent human adaptation, and we also uncover evidence that positive selection may currently be driving multiple retroCNVs toward fixation. Together these findings imply that retroCNVs are an especially important class of polymorphism, and that future studies of copy-number variation should search for these variants in order to illuminate their potential evolutionary and functional relevance.
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Genome-wide analysis of retrogene polymorphisms in Drosophila melanogaster.
Genome Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-03-2011
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Gene duplication via retrotransposition has been shown to be an important mechanism in evolution, affecting gene dosage and allowing for the acquisition of new gene functions. Although fixed retrotransposed genes have been found in a variety of species, very little effort has been made to identify retrogene polymorphisms. Here, we examine 37 Illumina-sequenced North American Drosophila melanogaster inbred lines and present the first ever data set and analysis of polymorphic retrogenes in Drosophila. We show that this type of polymorphism is quite common, with any two gametes in the North American population differing in the presence or absence of six retrogenes, accounting for ~13% of gene copy-number heterozygosity. These retrogenes were identified by a straightforward method that can be applied using any type of DNA sequencing data. We also use a variant of this method to conduct a genome-wide scan for intron presence/absence polymorphisms, and show that any two chromosomes in the population likely differ in the presence of multiple introns. We show that these polymorphisms are all in fact deletions rather than intron gain events present in the reference genome. Finally, by leveraging the known location of the parental genes that give rise to the retrogene polymorphisms, we provide direct evidence that natural selection is responsible for the excess of fixations of retrogenes moving off of the X chromosome in Drosophila. Further efforts to identify retrogene and intron presence/absence polymorphisms will undoubtedly improve our understanding of the evolution of gene copy number and gene structure.
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Very few RNA and DNA sequence differences in the human transcriptome.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-03-2011
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RNA editing is an important cellular process by which the nucleotides in a mature RNA transcript are altered to cause them to differ from the corresponding DNA sequence. While this process yields essential transcripts in humans and other organisms, it is believed to occur at a relatively small number of loci. The rarity of RNA editing has been challenged by a recent comparison of human RNA and DNA sequence data from 27 individuals, which revealed that over 10,000 human exonic sites appear to exhibit RNA-DNA differences (RDDs). Many of these differences could not have been caused by either of the two previously known human RNA editing mechanisms--ADAR-mediated A?G substitutions or APOBEC1-mediated C?U switches--suggesting that a previously unknown mechanism of RNA editing may be active in humans. Here, we reanalyze these data and demonstrate that genomic sequences exist in these same individuals or in the human genome that match the majority of RDDs. Our results suggest that the majority of these RDD events were observed due to accurate transcription of sequences paralogous to the apparently edited gene but differing at the edited site. In light of our results it seems prudent to conclude that if indeed an unknown mechanism is causing RDD events in humans, such events occur at a much lower frequency than originally proposed.
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Pervasive multinucleotide mutational events in eukaryotes.
Curr. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2011
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Many aspects of mutational processes are nonrandom, from the preponderance of transitions relative to transversions to the higher rate of mutation at CpG dinucleotides [1]. However, it is still often assumed that single-nucleotide mutations are independent of one another, each being caused by separate mutational events. The occurrence of multiple, closely spaced substitutions appears to violate assumptions of independence and is often interpreted as evidence for the action of adaptive natural selection [2, 3], balancing selection [4], or compensatory evolution [5, 6]. Here we provide evidence of a frequent, widespread multinucleotide mutational process active throughout eukaryotes. Genomic data from mutation-accumulation experiments, parent-offspring trios, and human polymorphisms all show that simultaneous nucleotide substitutions occur within short stretches of DNA. Regardless of species, such multinucleotide mutations (MNMs) consistently comprise ~3% of the total number of nucleotide substitutions. These results imply that previous adaptive interpretations of multiple, closely spaced substitutions may have been unwarranted and that MNMs must be considered when interpreting sequence data.
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Comparative and demographic analysis of orang-utan genomes.
Devin P Locke, LaDeana W Hillier, Wesley C Warren, Kim C Worley, Lynne V Nazareth, Donna M Muzny, Shiaw-Pyng Yang, Zhengyuan Wang, Asif T Chinwalla, Pat Minx, Makedonka Mitreva, Lisa Cook, Kim D Delehaunty, Catrina Fronick, Heather Schmidt, Lucinda A Fulton, Robert S Fulton, Joanne O Nelson, Vincent Magrini, Craig Pohl, Tina A Graves, Chris Markovic, Andy Cree, Huyen H Dinh, Jennifer Hume, Christie L Kovar, Gerald R Fowler, Gerton Lunter, Stephen Meader, Andreas Heger, Chris P Ponting, Tomas Marques-Bonet, Can Alkan, Lin Chen, Ze Cheng, Jeffrey M Kidd, Evan E Eichler, Simon White, Stephen Searle, Albert J Vilella, Yuan Chen, Paul Flicek, Jian Ma, Brian Raney, Bernard Suh, Richard Burhans, Javier Herrero, David Haussler, Rui Faria, Olga Fernando, Fleur Darré, Domènec Farré, Elodie Gazave, Meritxell Oliva, Arcadi Navarro, Roberta Roberto, Oronzo Capozzi, Nicoletta Archidiacono, Giuliano Della Valle, Stefania Purgato, Mariano Rocchi, Miriam K Konkel, Jerilyn A Walker, Brygg Ullmer, Mark A Batzer, Arian F A Smit, Robert Hubley, Claudio Casola, Daniel R Schrider, Matthew W Hahn, Víctor Quesada, Xose S Puente, Gonzalo R Ordoñez, Carlos Lopez-Otin, Tomás Vinar, Brona Brejova, Aakrosh Ratan, Robert S Harris, Webb Miller, Carolin Kosiol, Heather A Lawson, Vikas Taliwal, André L Martins, Adam Siepel, Arindam RoyChoudhury, Xin Ma, Jeremiah Degenhardt, Carlos D Bustamante, Ryan N Gutenkunst, Thomas Mailund, Julien Y Dutheil, Asger Hobolth, Mikkel H Schierup, Oliver A Ryder, Yuko Yoshinaga, Pieter J de Jong, George M Weinstock, Jeffrey Rogers, Elaine R Mardis, Richard A Gibbs, Richard K Wilson.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2011
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Orang-utan is derived from a Malay term meaning man of the forest and aptly describes the southeast Asian great apes native to Sumatra and Borneo. The orang-utan species, Pongo abelii (Sumatran) and Pongo pygmaeus (Bornean), are the most phylogenetically distant great apes from humans, thereby providing an informative perspective on hominid evolution. Here we present a Sumatran orang-utan draft genome assembly and short read sequence data from five Sumatran and five Bornean orang-utan genomes. Our analyses reveal that, compared to other primates, the orang-utan genome has many unique features. Structural evolution of the orang-utan genome has proceeded much more slowly than other great apes, evidenced by fewer rearrangements, less segmental duplication, a lower rate of gene family turnover and surprisingly quiescent Alu repeats, which have played a major role in restructuring other primate genomes. We also describe a primate polymorphic neocentromere, found in both Pongo species, emphasizing the gradual evolution of orang-utan genome structure. Orang-utans have extremely low energy usage for a eutherian mammal, far lower than their hominid relatives. Adding their genome to the repertoire of sequenced primates illuminates new signals of positive selection in several pathways including glycolipid metabolism. From the population perspective, both Pongo species are deeply diverse; however, Sumatran individuals possess greater diversity than their Bornean counterparts, and more species-specific variation. Our estimate of Bornean/Sumatran speciation time, 400,000?years ago, is more recent than most previous studies and underscores the complexity of the orang-utan speciation process. Despite a smaller modern census population size, the Sumatran effective population size (N(e)) expanded exponentially relative to the ancestral N(e) after the split, while Bornean N(e) declined over the same period. Overall, the resources and analyses presented here offer new opportunities in evolutionary genomics, insights into hominid biology, and an extensive database of variation for conservation efforts.
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Gene copy-number polymorphism in nature.
Proc. Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2010
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Differences between individuals in the copy-number of whole genes have been found in every multicellular species examined thus far. Such differences result in unique complements of protein-coding genes in all individuals, and have been shown to underlie adaptive phenotypic differences. Here, we review the evidence for copy-number variants (CNVs), focusing on the methods used to detect them and the molecular mechanisms responsible for generating this type of variation. Although there are multiple technical and computational challenges inherent to these experimental methods, next-generation sequencing technologies are making such experiments accessible in any system with a sequenced genome. We further discuss the connection between copy-number variation within species and copy-number divergence between species, showing that these values are exactly what one would expect from similar comparisons of nucleotide polymorphism and divergence. We conclude by reviewing the growing body of evidence for natural selection on copy-number variants. While it appears that most genic CNVs--especially deletions-are quickly eliminated by selection, there are now multiple studies demonstrating a strong link between copy-number differences at specific genes and phenotypic differences in adaptive traits. We argue that a complete understanding of the molecular basis for adaptive natural selection necessarily includes the study of copy-number variation.
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All human-specific gene losses are present in the genome as pseudogenes.
J. Comput. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2009
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The loss of previously established genes has been proposed as a major force in evolutionary change. While genome sequencing of many new species offers the opportunity to identify cases of gene loss, it is unclear which algorithms offer the greatest accuracy or sensitivity. A number of methods to identify gene losses rely on the presence of a pseudogene for each loss. If genes are deleted when lost, however, such methods will fail to identify these cases. As the fate of gene losses is still unclear, we identified gene losses through a method that does not require pseudogenes to identify human-specific gene losses. Of the several hundred probable gene losses initially identified, we were unable to find a single case of unambiguous gene loss via deletion. We were also able to identify a large number of previously unannotated genes in the human genome, some of which also had evidence for transcription. Though our results suggest that pseudogene-based methods for finding gene losses in humans will not miss many events, we discuss the dependence of these conclusions on the divergence times among the species considered. Supplementary Material is provided (see online Supplementary Material at www.liebertonline.com ).
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Genomic variation in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster.
Genetics
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This report of independent genome sequences of two natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster (37 from North America and 6 from Africa) provides unique insight into forces shaping genomic polymorphism and divergence. Evidence of interactions between natural selection and genetic linkage is abundant not only in centromere- and telomere-proximal regions, but also throughout the euchromatic arms. Linkage disequilibrium, which decays within 1 kbp, exhibits a strong bias toward coupling of the more frequent alleles and provides a high-resolution map of recombination rate. The juxtaposition of population genetics statistics in small genomic windows with gene structures and chromatin states yields a rich, high-resolution annotation, including the following: (1) 5- and 3-UTRs are enriched for regions of reduced polymorphism relative to lineage-specific divergence; (2) exons overlap with windows of excess relative polymorphism; (3) epigenetic marks associated with active transcription initiation sites overlap with regions of reduced relative polymorphism and relatively reduced estimates of the rate of recombination; (4) the rate of adaptive nonsynonymous fixation increases with the rate of crossing over per base pair; and (5) both duplications and deletions are enriched near origins of replication and their density correlates negatively with the rate of crossing over. Available demographic models of X and autosome descent cannot account for the increased divergence on the X and loss of diversity associated with the out-of-Africa migration. Comparison of the variation among these genomes to variation among genomes from D. simulans suggests that many targets of directional selection are shared between these species.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.