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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Chronic unlimited recording electrocorticography-guided resective epilepsy surgery: technology-enabled enhanced fidelity in seizure focus localization with improved surgical efficacy.
J. Neurosurg.
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2014
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Epilepsy surgery is at the cusp of a transformation due to the convergence of advancements in multiple technologies. Emerging neuromodulatory therapies offer the promise of functionally correcting neural instability and obviating the need for resective or ablative surgery in select cases. Chronic implanted neurological monitoring technology, delivered as part of a neuromodulatory therapeutic device or as a stand-alone monitoring system, offers the potential to monitor patients chronically in their normal ambulatory setting with outpatient medication regimens. This overcomes significant temporal limitations, pharmacological perturbations, and infection risks inherent in the present technology comprising subacute percutaneous inpatient monitoring of presurgical candidates in an epilepsy monitoring unit.
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Neurohistopathological findings at the electrode-tissue interface in long-term deep brain stimulation: systematic literature review, case report, and assessment of stimulation threshold safety.
Neuromodulation
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2014
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Despite the widespread use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of neurologic disorders for over a quarter of a century, there has not been a systematic review and analyses of cases in which long-term postmortem clinic-pathologic data have been collected demonstrating the effects of chronically implanted electrodes and electrical stimulation on human brain tissue. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive systematic review of the literature on clinicopathologic findings of DBS tissue-electrode interface (TEI) and to determine types and prevalences of neuropathological findings among electrode materials and stimulation parameters and to augment this with previously unpublished histopathological data, images, and analyses from a DBS case implanted for 12 years, providing the longest duration histopathological follow-up.
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C4-C5 post-traumatic spondyloptosis with in situ fusion: systematic literature review and case report.
Spine
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2013
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A case report with systematic review of the literature.
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Long-term deep brain stimulation for essential tremor: 12-year clinicopathologic follow-up.
Mov. Disord.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2010
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We describe the clinical course and postmortem pathological findings in a patient with essential tremor (ET) treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) for 12 years. This 75 year old woman had a 13-year history of progressive ET prior to implantation of bilateral quadripolar DBS electrodes in the region of her ventral intermediate thalamic nuclei in 1996, producing immediate relief of arm tremor. Histopathological examination of the brain, performed 12 years after the initial implantation, demonstrated electrode catheter tracts rimmed by 20-25 micron fibrous sheaths, with multinucleated giant cells and reactive gliosis. Lymphocytic infiltration was seen by L26 immunoreactivity with CD3 (T cells) staining predominating over CD20 (B cells). Cerebellar axonal spheroids and Purkinje cell loss were found. The minimal foreign body reaction and gliosis around the electrodes 12 years after implantation supports the long-term safety of DBS. The case represents the longest reported follow-up with autopsy examination after DBS and confirmed histological changes associated with ET.
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Stimulation of sympathetic innervation in the upper gastrointestinal tract as a treatment for obesity.
Med. Hypotheses
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2009
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Sympathetic activity and obesity have a reciprocal relationship. Firstly, hypothalamic obesity is associated with decreased sympathetic activity. Caffeine and ephedrine increase sympathetic activity and induce weight loss, of which 25% is due to increased metabolic rate and 75% is due to a reciprocally decreased food intake. Secondly, hormones and drugs that affect body weight have an inverse relationship between food intake and metabolic rate. Neuropeptide Y decreases sympathetic activity and increases food intake and body weight. Thirdly, a gastric pacemaker Transcend and vagotomy increase the ratio of sympathetic to parasympathetic activation, decrease food intake, and block gut satiety hormones. Weight loss with the pacemaker or vagotomy is variable. Significant weight reduction is seen only in a small group of those treated. This suggests that activation of the sympathetic arm of the autonomic nervous system may be most important for weight loss. Systemic sympathetic activation causes weight loss in obese patients, but side effects limited its use. We hypothesize that selective local electrical sympathetic stimulation of the upper gastrointestinal tract may induce weight loss and offer a safer, yet effective, obesity treatment. Celiac ganglia delivers sympathetic innervation to the upper gastrointestinal tract. Voltage regulated electrical simulation of the rat celiac ganglia increased metabolic rate in a dose-dependent manner. Stimulation of 6, 3, or 1.5 V increased metabolic rate 15.6%, 6.2%, and 5%, respectively in a single rat. These responses support our hypothesis that selective sympathetic stimulation of the upper GI tract may treat obesity while avoiding side effects of systemic sympathetic activation.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.