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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Safety Assessment of Animal- and Plant-Derived Amino Acids as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2014
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of animal- and plant-derived amino acid mixtures, which function as skin and hair conditioning agents. The safety of ?-amino acids as direct food additives has been well established, based on extensive research through acute and chronic dietary exposures and the Panel previously has reviewed the safety of individual ?-amino acids in cosmetics. The Panel focused its review on dermal irritation and sensitization data relevant to the use of these ingredients in topical cosmetics. The Panel concluded that these 21 ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration as used in cosmetics.
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Amended safety assessment of hypericum perforatum-derived ingredients as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) has issued an amended safety assessment of 7 Hypericum perforatum-derived ingredients as used in cosmetics. A common name for this plant is St John wort. These ingredients function in cosmetics as skin-conditioning agents-miscellaneous and antimicrobial agents. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to the H perforatum-derived ingredients. Because formulators may use more than 1 botanical ingredient in a formulation, caution was urged to avoid levels of toxicological concern for constituent chemicals and impurities. The Panel concluded that H perforatum-derived ingredients were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as described in this safety assessment.
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Safety Assessment of Vitis vinifera (Grape)-Derived Ingredients as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of 24 Vitis vinifera (grape)-derived ingredients and found them safe in the present practices of use and concentration in cosmetics. These ingredients function in cosmetics mostly as skin-conditioning agents, but some function as antioxidants, flavoring agents, and/or colorants. The Panel reviewed the available animal and clinical data to determine the safety of these ingredients. Additionally, some constituents of grapes have been assessed previously for safety as cosmetic ingredients by the Panel, and others are compounds that have been discussed in previous Panel safety assessments.
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Safety assessment of modified terephthalate polymers as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
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The safety of 6 modified terephthalate polymers as cosmetic ingredients was assessed. These ingredients mostly function as exfoliants, bulking agents, hair fixatives, and viscosity-increasing agents-nonaqueous. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is used in leave-on products up to 100% and in rinse-off products up to 2%. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) considered that the PET used in cosmetics is chemically equivalent to that used in medical devices. The Panel determined that the Food and Drug Administration's determination of safety of PET in several medical devices, which included human and animal safety data, can be used as the basis for the determination of safety of PET and related polymers used in cosmetics. Use studies of cosmetic eye products that contain PET demonstrated no ocular irritation or dermal sensitization. The Panel concluded that modified terephthalate polymers were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment.
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Safety assessment of 6-hydroxyindole as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 6-hydroxyindole, which functions as an oxidative hair dye ingredient. The Panel considered relevant animal and human data provided in this safety assessment and concluded that 6-hydroxyindole is safe for use in oxidative hair dye formulations.
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Site-specific mapping and quantification of protein S-sulphenylation in cells.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2014
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Cysteine S-sulphenylation provides redox regulation of protein functions, but the global cellular impact of this transient post-translational modification remains unexplored. We describe a chemoproteomic workflow to map and quantify over 1,000 S-sulphenylation sites on more than 700 proteins in intact cells. Quantitative analysis of human cells stimulated with hydrogen peroxide or epidermal growth factor measured hundreds of site selective redox changes. Different cysteines in the same proteins displayed dramatic differences in susceptibility to S-sulphenylation. Newly discovered S-sulphenylations provided mechanistic support for proposed cysteine redox reactions and suggested novel redox mechanisms, including S-sulphenyl-mediated redox regulation of the transcription factor HIF1A by SIRT6. S-sulphenylation is favored at solvent-exposed protein surfaces and is associated with sequence motifs that are distinct from those for other thiol modifications. S-sulphenylations affect regulators of phosphorylation, acetylation and ubiquitylation, which suggest regulatory crosstalk between redox control and signalling pathways.
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Safety Assessment of PEGylated Oils as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2014
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PEGylated oil is a terminology used to describe cosmetic ingredients that are the etherification and esterification products of glycerides and fatty acids with ethylene oxide. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) considered the safety of PEGylated oils, which function primarily as surfactants in cosmetic products. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data provided in this safety assessment and concluded that the 130 chemically related PEGylated oils were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of use and concentration when formulated to be nonirritating.
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Safety Assessment of Dimethicone Crosspolymers as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2014
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 62 dimethicone crosspolymer ingredients as used in cosmetics. These ingredients function mostly as absorbents, bulking agents, film formers, hair-conditioning agents, emollient skin-conditioning agents, slip modifiers, surface modifiers, and nonaqueous viscosity-increasing agents. The Panel reviewed available animal and human data related to these polymers and addressed the issue of residual monomers. The Panel concluded that these dimethicone crosspolymer ingredients are safe in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.
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Safety Assessment of Chlorphenesin as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2014
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Chlorphenesin functions as a biocide in cosmetics and is used at concentrations up to 0.32% in rinse-off products and up to 0.3% in leave-on products. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) noted that chlorphenesin was well absorbed when applied to the skin of rats; however, any safety concern was minimized because available data demonstrated an absence of toxicity. The Panel concluded that chlorphenesin is safe in the present practices of use and concentration.
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Safety Assessment of Cucumis sativus (Cucumber)-Derived Ingredients as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2014
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The CIR Expert Panel assessed the safety of 6 Cucumis sativus (cucumber)-derived ingredients and found them safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentration. These ingredients are reported to function in cosmetics as skin-conditioning agents. Cucumber is a commonly consumed food with no history of significant adverse effects, suggesting that its ingredients should not pose any major safety issues following oral exposure. This assessment focused on the dermal exposure to the low concentrations of these ingredients as used in cosmetics. Some of the constituents of cucumbers have been assessed previously for safe use as cosmetic ingredients.
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Safety Assessment of Citric Acid, Inorganic Citrate Salts, and Alkyl Citrate Esters as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2014
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The CIR Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of citric acid, 12 inorganic citrate salts, and 20 alkyl citrate esters as used in cosmetics, concluding that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration. Citric acid is reported to function as a pH adjuster, chelating agent, or fragrance ingredient. Some of the salts are also reported to function as chelating agents, and a number of the citrates are reported to function as skin-conditioning agents but other functions are also reported. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data, but because citric acid, calcium citrate, ferric citrate, manganese citrate, potassium citrate, sodium citrate, diammonium citrate, isopropyl citrate, stearyl citrate, and triethyl citrate are generally recognized as safe direct food additives, dermal exposure was the focus for these ingredients in this cosmetic ingredient safety assessment.
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Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2014
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Extensive genomic characterization of human cancers presents the problem of inference from genomic abnormalities to cancer phenotypes. To address this problem, we analysed proteomes of colon and rectal tumours characterized previously by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and perform integrated proteogenomic analyses. Somatic variants displayed reduced protein abundance compared to germline variants. Messenger RNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein abundance differences between tumours. Proteomics identified five proteomic subtypes in the TCGA cohort, two of which overlapped with the TCGA 'microsatellite instability/CpG island methylation phenotype' transcriptomic subtype, but had distinct mutation, methylation and protein expression patterns associated with different clinical outcomes. Although copy number alterations showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA abundance, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. The chromosome 20q amplicon was associated with the largest global changes at both mRNA and protein levels; proteomics data highlighted potential 20q candidates, including HNF4A (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, alpha), TOMM34 (translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 34) and SRC (SRC proto-oncogene, non-receptor tyrosine kinase). Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords a new paradigm for understanding cancer biology.
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Ischemia in tumors induces early and sustained phosphorylation changes in stress kinase pathways but does not affect global protein levels.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2014
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Protein abundance and phosphorylation convey important information about pathway activity and molecular pathophysiology in diseases including cancer, providing biological insight, informing drug and diagnostic development, and guiding therapeutic intervention. Analyzed tissues are usually collected without tight regulation or documentation of ischemic time. To evaluate the impact of ischemia, we collected human ovarian tumor and breast cancer xenograft tissue without vascular interruption and performed quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics after defined ischemic intervals. Although the global expressed proteome and most of the >25,000 quantified phosphosites were unchanged after 60 min, rapid phosphorylation changes were observed in up to 24% of the phosphoproteome, representing activation of critical cancer pathways related to stress response, transcriptional regulation, and cell death. Both pan-tumor and tissue-specific changes were observed. The demonstrated impact of pre-analytical tissue ischemia on tumor biology mandates caution in interpreting stress-pathway activation in such samples and motivates reexamination of collection protocols for phosphoprotein analysis.
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Targeted peptide measurements in biology and medicine: best practices for mass spectrometry-based assay development using a fit-for-purpose approach.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2014
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Adoption of targeted mass spectrometry (MS) approaches such as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to study biological and biomedical questions is well underway in the proteomics community. Successful application depends on the ability to generate reliable assays that uniquely and confidently identify target peptides in a sample. Unfortunately, there is a wide range of criteria being applied to say that an assay has been successfully developed. There is no consensus on what criteria are acceptable and little understanding of the impact of variable criteria on the quality of the results generated. Publications describing targeted MS assays for peptides frequently do not contain sufficient information for readers to establish confidence that the tests work as intended or to be able to apply the tests described in their own labs. Guidance must be developed so that targeted MS assays with established performance can be made widely distributed and applied by many labs worldwide. To begin to address the problems and their solutions, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health with representatives from the multiple communities developing and employing targeted MS assays. Participants discussed the analytical goals of their experiments and the experimental evidence needed to establish that the assays they develop work as intended and are achieving the required levels of performance. Using this "fit-for-purpose" approach, the group defined three tiers of assays distinguished by their performance and extent of analytical characterization. Computational and statistical tools useful for the analysis of targeted MS results were described. Participants also detailed the information that authors need to provide in their manuscripts to enable reviewers and readers to clearly understand what procedures were performed and to evaluate the reliability of the peptide or protein quantification measurements reported. This paper presents a summary of the meeting and recommendations.
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Alkylation damage by lipid electrophiles targets functional protein systems.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
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Protein alkylation by reactive electrophiles contributes to chemical toxicities and oxidative stress, but the functional impact of alkylation damage across proteomes is poorly understood. We used Click chemistry and shotgun proteomics to profile the accumulation of proteome damage in human cells treated with lipid electrophile probes. Protein target profiles revealed three damage susceptibility classes, as well as proteins that were highly resistant to alkylation. Damage occurred selectively across functional protein interaction networks, with the most highly alkylation-susceptible proteins mapping to networks involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Proteins with lower damage susceptibility mapped to networks involved in protein synthesis and turnover and were alkylated only at electrophile concentrations that caused significant toxicity. Hierarchical susceptibility of proteome systems to alkylation may allow cells to survive sublethal damage while protecting critical cell functions.
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Amended safety assessment of formaldehyde and methylene glycol as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2013
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Formaldehyde and methylene glycol may be used safely in cosmetics if established limits are not exceeded and are safe for use in nail hardeners in the present practices of use and concentration, which include instructions to avoid skin contact. In hair-smoothing products, however, in the present practices of use and concentration, formaldehyde and methylene glycol are unsafe. Methylene glycol is continuously converted to formaldehyde, and vice versa, even at equilibrium, which can be easily shifted by heating, drying, and other conditions to increase the amount of formaldehyde. This rapid, reversible formaldehyde/methylene glycol equilibrium is distinguished from the slow, irreversible release of formaldehyde resulting from the so-called formaldehyde releaser preservatives, which are not addressed in this safety assessment (formaldehyde releasers may continue to be safely used in cosmetics at the levels established in their individual Cosmetic Ingredient Review safety assessments).
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Safety Assessment of ?-Amino Acids as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of ?-amino acids, which function primarily as hair- and skin-conditioning agents in cosmetic products. The safety of ?-amino acids as direct food additives has been well established based on extensive research through acute and chronic dietary exposures. The Panel focused its review on dermal irritation and sensitization data relevant to the use of these ingredients in topical cosmetics. The Panel concluded that ?-amino acids were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration of this safety assessment.
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Safety assessment of ammonium hectorites as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 4 ammonium hectorite compounds used in cosmetics: disteardimonium hectorite, dihydrogenated tallow benzylmonium hectorite, stearalkonium hectorite, and quaternium-18 hectorite. These ingredients function in cosmetics mainly as nonsurfactant suspending agents. The Panel reviewed available animal and human data and concluded that these ammonium hectorite compounds were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.
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Comparison of protein immunoprecipitation-multiple reaction monitoring with ELISA for assay of biomarker candidates in plasma.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-19-2013
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Quantitative analysis of protein biomarkers in plasma is typically done by ELISA, but this method is limited by the availability of high-quality antibodies. An alternative approach is protein immunoprecipitation combined with multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (IP-MRM). We compared IP-MRM to ELISA for the analysis of six colon cancer biomarker candidates (metalloproteinase inhibitor 1 (TIMP1), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), thrombospondin-2 (THBS2), endoglin (ENG), mesothelin (MSLN) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9)) in plasma from colon cancer patients and noncancer controls. Proteins were analyzed by multiplex immunoprecipitation from plasma with the ELISA capture antibodies, further purified by SDS-PAGE, digested and analyzed by stable isotope dilution MRM. IP-MRM provided linear responses (r = 0.978-0.995) between 10 and 640 ng/mL for the target proteins spiked into a "mock plasma" matrix consisting of 60 mg/mL bovine serum albumin. Measurement variation (coefficient of variation at the limit of detection) for IP-MRM assays ranged from 2.3 to 19%, which was similar to variation for ELISAs of the same samples. IP-MRM and ELISA measurements for all target proteins except ENG were highly correlated (r = 0.67-0.97). IP-MRM with high-quality capture antibodies thus provides an effective alternative method to ELISA for protein quantitation in biological fluids.
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Proteogenomic Analysis Reveals Unanticipated Adaptations of Colorectal Tumor Cells to Deficiencies in DNA Mismatch Repair.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-18-2013
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A growing body of genomic data on human cancers poses the critical question of how genomic variations translate to cancer phenotypes. We used standardized shotgun proteomics and targeted protein quantitation platforms to analyze a panel of 10 colon cancer cell lines differing by mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. In addition, we performed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to enable detection of protein sequence variants from the proteomic data. Biologic replicate cultures yielded highly consistent proteomic inventories with a cumulative total of 6,513 protein groups with a protein false discovery rate of 3.17% across all cell lines. Networks of coexpressed proteins with differential expression based on MMR status revealed impact on protein folding, turnover and transport, on cellular metabolism and on DNA and RNA synthesis and repair. Analysis of variant amino acid sequences suggested higher stability of proteins affected by naturally occurring germline polymorphisms than of proteins affected by somatic protein sequence changes. The data provide evidence for multisystem adaptation to MMR deficiency with a stress response that targets misfolded proteins for degradation through the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway. Enrichment analysis suggested epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in RKO cells, as evidenced by increased mobility and invasion properties compared with SW480. The observed proteomic profiles demonstrate previously unknown consequences of altered DNA repair and provide an expanded basis for mechanistic interpretation of MMR phenotypes. Cancer Res; 74(1); 1-11. ©2013 AACR.
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Safety assessment of borosilicate glasses as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of calcium sodium borosilicate, calcium aluminum borosilicate, calcium titanium borosilicate, silver borosilicate, and zinc borosilicate as used in cosmetics. These borosilicate glasses function mostly as bulking agents. Available animal and human data were considered along with data from a previous safety assessment of magnesium silicates. The similar structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients enabled grouping them and using the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. Data submitted on calcium borosilicate, which is not a cosmetic ingredient, are also included as additional support for the safety of borosilicate glass ingredients. The Panel concluded that borosilicate glasses are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.
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Safety assessment of alkyl glyceryl ethers as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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Alkyl glyceryl ethers function mostly as skin-conditioning agents in cosmetic products applied to the skin and hair. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review expert panel reviewed the available animal toxicity and clinical data, including the low dermal absorption, and concluded that the alkyl glyceryl ethers are safe in the present practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment.
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Safety assessment of bis-diglyceryl polyacyladipate-2 and bis-diglyceryl polyacyladipate-1 as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel assessed the safety of bis-diglyceryl polyacyladipate-2 and bis-diglyceryl polyacyladipate-1 as used in cosmetics, finding that these ingredients are safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentration. Both ingredients are lanolin substitutes and are reported to function in cosmetics as skin-conditioning agents--emollients. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data in making its determination of safety.
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Safety assessment of lauriminodipropionic acid, sodium lauriminodipropionate, and disodium lauriminodipropionate as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel assessed the safety of lauriminodipropionic acid, sodium lauriminodipropionate, and disodium lauriminodipropionate as used in cosmetics. These ingredients function in cosmetics as hair-conditioning agents and surfactant-cleansing agents. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to the safety of these ingredients in cosmetics. The Panel concluded that lauriminodipropionic acid, sodium lauriminodipropionate, and disodium lauriminodipropionate are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of use and concentration.
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Safety assessment of decyl glucoside and other alkyl glucosides as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel assessed the safety of 19 alkyl glucosides as used in cosmetics and concluded that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration when formulated to be nonirritating. Most of these ingredients function as surfactants in cosmetics, but some have additional functions as skin-conditioning agents, hair-conditioning agents, or emulsion stabilizers. The Panel reviewed the available animal and clinical data on these ingredients. Since glucoside hydrolases in human skin are likely to break down these ingredients to release their respective fatty acids and glucose, the Panel also reviewed CIR reports on the safety of fatty alcohols and were able to extrapolate data from those previous reports to support safety.
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Statistical Design for Biospecimen Cohort Size in Proteomics-based Biomarker Discovery and Verification Studies.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2013
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Protein biomarkers are needed to deepen our understanding of cancer biology and to improve our ability to diagnose, monitor, and treat cancers. Important analytical and clinical hurdles must be overcome to allow the most promising protein biomarker candidates to advance into clinical validation studies. Although contemporary proteomics technologies support the measurement of large numbers of proteins in individual clinical specimens, sample throughput remains comparatively low. This problem is amplified in typical clinical proteomics research studies, which routinely suffer from a lack of proper experimental design, resulting in analysis of too few biospecimens to achieve adequate statistical power at each stage of a biomarker pipeline. To address this critical shortcoming, a joint workshop was held by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) with participation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). An important output from the workshop was a statistical framework for the design of biomarker discovery and verification studies. Herein, we describe the use of quantitative clinical judgments to set statistical criteria for clinical relevance and the development of an approach to calculate biospecimen sample size for proteomic studies in discovery and verification stages prior to clinical validation stage. This represents a first step toward building a consensus on quantitative criteria for statistical design of proteomics biomarker discovery and verification research.
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Connecting genomic alterations to cancer biology with proteomics: the NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium.
Cancer Discov
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2013
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The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verification using targeted mass spectrometry methods.
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RNA-seq data analysis at the gene and CDS levels provides a comprehensive view of transcriptome responses induced by 4-hydroxynonenal.
Mol Biosyst
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2013
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Reactive electrophiles produced during oxidative stress, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), are increasingly recognized as contributing factors in a variety of degenerative and inflammatory diseases. Here we used the RNA-seq technology to characterize transcriptome responses in RKO cells induced by HNE at subcytotoxic and cytotoxic doses. RNA-seq analysis rediscovered most of the differentially expressed genes reported by microarray studies and also identified novel gene responses. Interestingly, differential expression detection at the coding DNA sequence (CDS) level helped to further improve the consistency between the two technologies, suggesting the utility and importance of the CDS level analysis. RNA-seq data analysis combining gene and CDS levels yielded an informative and comprehensive picture of gradually evolving response networks with increasing HNE doses, from cell protection against oxidative injury at low dose, initiation of cell apoptosis and DNA damage at intermediate dose to significant deregulation of cellular functions at high dose. These evolving dose-dependent pathway changes, which cannot be observed by the gene level analysis alone, clearly reveal the HNE cytotoxic effect and are supported by IC50 experiments. Additionally, differential expression at the CDS level provides new insights into isoform regulation mechanisms. Taken together, our data demonstrate the power of RNA-seq to identify subtle transcriptome changes and to characterize effects induced by HNE through the generation of high-resolution data coupled with differential analysis at both gene and CDS levels.
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Safety assessment of silylates and surface-modified siloxysilicates.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel assessed the safety of silica silylate, silica dimethyl silylate, trimethylsiloxysilicate, and trifluoropropyldimethyl/trimethylsiloxysilicate as used in cosmetics. These silylates and surface-modified siloxysilicates function in cosmetics as antifoaming agents, anticaking agents, bulking agents, binders, skin-conditioning agents--emollient, skin-conditioning agents-occlusive, slip modifiers, suspension agents--nonsurfactant, and viscosity increasing agents--nonaqueous. The Expert Panel reviewed the available animal and clinical data as well as information from a previous CIR safety assessment of amorphous silica. The CIR Expert Panel concluded that silica silylate, silica dimethyl silylate, trimethylsiloxysilicate, and trifluoropropyldimethyl/trimethylsiloxysilicate are safe as used when formulated and delivered in the final product not to be irritating or sensitizing to the respiratory tract.
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Safety assessment of triethanolamine and triethanolamine-containing ingredients as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel assessed the safety of triethanolamine (TEA) and 31 related TEA-containing ingredients as used in cosmetics. The TEA is reported to function as a surfactant or pH adjuster; the related TEA-containing ingredients included in this safety assessment are reported to function as surfactants and hair- or skin-conditioning agents. The exception is TEA-sorbate, which is reported to function as a preservative. The Panel reviewed the available animal and clinical data. Although data were not available for all the ingredients, the panel relied on the information available for TEA in conjunction with previous safety assessments of components of TEA-containing ingredients. These data could be extrapolated to support the safety of all included ingredients. The panel concluded that TEA and related TEA-containing ingredients named in this report are safe as used when formulated to be nonirritating. These ingredients should not be used in cosmetic products in which N-nitroso compounds can be formed.
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Safety assessment of diethanolamides as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2013
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Cocamide diethanolamine (DEA) and some of the other diethanolamides are mainly used as surfactant foam boosters or viscosity increasing agents in cosmetics, although a few are reported to be used as hair and skin conditioning agents, surfactant-cleansing or surfactant-emulsifying agents, or as an opacifying agent. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel considered new data and information from previous CIR reports to assess the concerns about the potential for amidases in human skin to convert these diethanolamides into DEA and the corresponding fatty acids. The Expert Panel concluded that these diethanolamides are safe as used when formulated to be nonirritating and when the levels of free DEA in the diethanolamides do not exceed those considered safe by the Panel. The Panel also recommended that these ingredients not be used in cosmetic products in which N-nitroso compounds can be formed.
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Safety assessment of 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole and 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2013
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2-Amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole and its salt, 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate, are used as coupling agents in oxidative hair dyes. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to the ingredient. The Expert Panel concluded that 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole and 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate are safe for use in oxidative hair dye formulations. The Expert Panel cautioned that these ingredients should not be used in cosmetic products in which N-nitroso compounds may be formed.
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Design, implementation and multisite evaluation of a system suitability protocol for the quantitative assessment of instrument performance in liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring-MS (LC-MRM-MS).
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2013
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Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry coupled with stable isotope dilution (SID) and liquid chromatography (LC) is increasingly used in biological and clinical studies for precise and reproducible quantification of peptides and proteins in complex sample matrices. Robust LC-SID-MRM-MS-based assays that can be replicated across laboratories and ultimately in clinical laboratory settings require standardized protocols to demonstrate that the analysis platforms are performing adequately. We developed a system suitability protocol (SSP), which employs a predigested mixture of six proteins, to facilitate performance evaluation of LC-SID-MRM-MS instrument platforms, configured with nanoflow-LC systems interfaced to triple quadrupole mass spectrometers. The SSP was designed for use with low multiplex analyses as well as high multiplex approaches when software-driven scheduling of data acquisition is required. Performance was assessed by monitoring of a range of chromatographic and mass spectrometric metrics including peak width, chromatographic resolution, peak capacity, and the variability in peak area and analyte retention time (RT) stability. The SSP, which was evaluated in 11 laboratories on a total of 15 different instruments, enabled early diagnoses of LC and MS anomalies that indicated suboptimal LC-MRM-MS performance. The observed range in variation of each of the metrics scrutinized serves to define the criteria for optimized LC-SID-MRM-MS platforms for routine use, with pass/fail criteria for system suitability performance measures defined as peak area coefficient of variation <0.15, peak width coefficient of variation <0.15, standard deviation of RT <0.15 min (9 s), and the RT drift <0.5min (30 s). The deleterious effect of a marginally performing LC-SID-MRM-MS system on the limit of quantification (LOQ) in targeted quantitative assays illustrates the use and need for a SSP to establish robust and reliable system performance. Use of a SSP helps to ensure that analyte quantification measurements can be replicated with good precision within and across multiple laboratories and should facilitate more widespread use of MRM-MS technology by the basic biomedical and clinical laboratory research communities.
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Integrative omics analysis reveals the importance and scope of translational repression in microRNA-mediated regulation.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2013
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key post-transcriptional regulators that inhibit gene expression by promoting mRNA decay and/or suppressing translation. However, the relative contributions of these two mechanisms to gene repression remain controversial. Early studies favor a translational repression-centric scenario, whereas recent large-scale studies suggest a dominant role of mRNA decay in miRNA regulation. Here we generated proteomics data for nine colorectal cancer cell lines and integrated them with matched miRNA and mRNA expression data to infer and characterize miRNA-mediated regulation. Consistent with previous reports, we found that 8mer site, site positioning within 3UTR, local AU-rich context, and additional 3 pairing could all help boost miRNA-mediated mRNA decay. However, these sequence features were generally not correlated with increased translational repression, except for local AU-rich context. Thus the contribution of translational repression might be underestimated in recent studies in which the analyses were based primarily on the response of genes with canonical 7-8 mer sites in 3UTRs. Indeed, we found that translational repression was involved in more than half, and played a major role in one-third of all predicted miRNA-target interactions. It was even the predominant contributor to miR-138 mediated regulation, which was further supported by the observation that differential expression of miR-138 in two genetically matched cell lines corresponded to altered protein but not mRNA abundance of most target genes. In addition, our study also provided interesting insights into colon cancer biology such as the possible contributions of miR-138 and miR-141/miR-200c in inducing specific phenotypes of SW480 and RKO cell lines, respectively.
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Targeted quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry.
Biochemistry
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2013
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Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement.
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Targeted protein capture for analysis of electrophile-protein adducts.
Methods Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2013
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Proteomic analyses of protein-electrophile adducts generally employ affinity capture of the adduct moiety, which enables global analyses, but is poorly suited to targeted studies of specific proteins. We describe a targeted molecular probe approach to study modifications of the molecular chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which regulates diverse client proteins. Noncovalent affinity capture with a biotinyl analog of the HSP90 inhibitor geldanamycin enables detection of the native protein isoforms Hsp90? and Hsp90? and their phosphorylated forms. We applied this probe to map and quantify adducts formed on Hsp90 by 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) in RKO cells. This approach was also applied to measure the kinetics of site-specific adduction of selected Hsp90 residues. A protein-selective affinity capture approach is broadly applicable for targeted analysis of electrophile adducts and their biological effects.
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Basophile: accurate fragment charge state prediction improves peptide identification rates.
Genomics Proteomics Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2013
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In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of charged peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.
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Safety assessment of xylene sulfonic acid, toluene sulfonic acid, and alkyl aryl sulfonate hydrotropes as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-21-2011
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Xylene sulfonic acid, toluene sulfonic acid, and alkyl aryl sulfonate hydrotropes used in cosmetics as surfactants, hydrotropes, were reviewed in this safety assessment. The similar structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients enabled grouping them and using the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to these ingredients. The panel concluded that xylene sulfonic acid and alkyl aryl sulfonate hydrotropes are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of use and concentrations as described in this safety assessment, when formulated to be nonirritating.
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Final report of the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel on the safety assessment of pelargonic acid (nonanoic acid) and nonanoate esters.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-21-2011
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Pelargonic acid and its esters function as skin-conditioning agents in cosmetics. Molecular weight (mw) and octanol-water partition coefficient data suggest that dermal penetration is possible. The biohandling of branched-chain fatty acids is not the same as for straight-chain fatty acids, but the differences are not significant to the conclusion that they all are readily metabolized to nontoxic moieties. Limited data suggested that the penetration of other ingredients may be enhanced if these ingredients are present in the same formulation. These ingredients are not significant oral or dermal toxicants in animal studies. They are not reproductive/developmental toxicants or genotoxic/carcinogenic in animal studies. The available data suggested that product formulations containing these ingredients would be nonirritating and nonsensitizing to human skin, but formulators were cautioned to consider the penetration enhancement potential. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration.
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Safety assessment of cyclomethicone, cyclotetrasiloxane, cyclopentasiloxane, cyclohexasiloxane, and cycloheptasiloxane.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-21-2011
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Cyclomethicone (mixture) and the specific chain length cyclic siloxanes (n = 4-7) reviewed in this safety assessment are cyclic dimethyl polysiloxane compounds. These ingredients have the skin/hair conditioning agent function in common. Minimal percutaneous absorption was associated with these ingredients and the available data do not suggest skin irritation or sensitization potential. Also, it is not likely that dermal exposure to these ingredients from cosmetics would cause significant systemic exposure. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration.
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Protein identification using customized protein sequence databases derived from RNA-Seq data.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-14-2011
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The standard shotgun proteomics data analysis strategy relies on searching MS/MS spectra against a context-independent protein sequence database derived from the complete genome sequence of an organism. Because transcriptome sequence analysis (RNA-Seq) promises an unbiased and comprehensive picture of the transcriptome, we reason that a sample-specific protein database derived from RNA-Seq data can better approximate the real protein pool in the sample and thus improve protein identification. In this study, we have developed a two-step strategy for building sample-specific protein databases from RNA-Seq data. First, the database size is reduced by eliminating unexpressed or lowly expressed genes according to transcript quantification. Second, high-quality nonsynonymous coding single nucleotide variations (SNVs) are identified based on RNA-Seq data, and corresponding protein variants are added to the database. Using RNA-Seq and shotgun proteomics data from two colorectal cancer cell lines SW480 and RKO, we demonstrated that customized protein sequence databases could significantly increase the sensitivity of peptide identification, reduce ambiguity in protein assembly, and enable the detection of known and novel peptide variants. Thus, sample-specific databases from RNA-Seq data can enable more sensitive and comprehensive protein discovery in shotgun proteomics studies.
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Proteomic consequences of a single gene mutation in a colorectal cancer model.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-13-2011
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The proteomic effects of specific cancer-related mutations have not been well characterized. In colorectal cancer (CRC), a relatively small number of mutations in key signaling pathways appear to drive tumorigenesis. Mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, occur in up to 60% of CRC tumors. Here we examine the proteomic consequences of a single gene mutation by using an isogenic CRC cell culture model in which wildtype APC expression has been ectopically restored. Using LC-MS/MS label free shotgun proteomics, over 5000 proteins were identified in SW480Null (mutant APC) and SW480APC (APC restored). We observed 155 significantly differentially expressed proteins between the two cell lines, with 26 proteins showing opposite expression trends relative to gene expression measurements. Protein changes corresponded to previously characterized features of the APCNull phenotype: loss of cell adhesion proteins, increase in cell cycle regulators, alteration in Wnt signaling related proteins, and redistribution of ?-catenin. Increased expression of RNA processing and isoprenoid biosynthetic proteins occurred in SW480Null cells. Therefore, shotgun proteomics reveals proteomic differences associated with a single gene change, including many novel differences that fall outside known target pathways.
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Protein expression signatures for inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated signaling.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 12-05-2011
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Analysis of cellular signaling networks typically involves targeted measurements of phosphorylated protein intermediates. However, phosphoproteomic analyses usually require affinity enrichment of phosphopeptides and can be complicated by artifactual changes in phosphorylation caused by uncontrolled preanalytical variables, particularly in the analysis of tissue specimens. We asked whether changes in protein expression, which are more stable and easily analyzed, could reflect network stimulation and inhibition. We employed this approach to analyze stimulation and inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by EGF and selective EGFR inhibitors. Shotgun analysis of proteomes from proliferating A431 cells, EGF-stimulated cells, and cells co-treated with the EGFR inhibitors cetuximab or gefitinib identified groups of differentially expressed proteins. Comparisons of these protein groups identified 13 proteins whose EGF-induced expression changes were reversed by both EGFR inhibitors. Targeted multiple reaction monitoring analysis verified differential expression of 12 of these proteins, which comprise a candidate EGFR inhibition signature. We then tested these 12 proteins by multiple reaction monitoring analysis in three other models: 1) a comparison of DiFi (EGFR inhibitor-sensitive) and HCT116 (EGFR-insensitive) cell lines, 2) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded mouse xenograft DiFi and HCT116 tumors, and 3) in tissue biopsies from a patient with the gastric hyperproliferative disorder Ménétriers disease who was treated with cetuximab. Of the proteins in the candidate signature, a core group, including c-Jun, Jagged-1, and Claudin 4, were decreased by EGFR inhibitors in all three models. Although the goal of these studies was not to validate a clinically useful EGFR inhibition signature, the results confirm the hypothesis that clinically used EGFR inhibitors generate characteristic protein expression changes. This work further outlines a prototypical approach to derive and test protein expression signatures for drug action on signaling networks.
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Final report of the Amended Safety Assessment of PVM/MA copolymer and its related salts and esters as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2011
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Polyvinyl methyl ether/maleic acid (PVM/MA) copolymer, and its related salts and esters, are used in cosmetics, mainly as binders, film formers, and hair fixatives. Animal and human data relevant to the use of these ingredients in cosmetic products were reviewed by the CIR Expert Panel. The Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe for use in cosmetic products.
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Supporting tool suite for production proteomics.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2011
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The large amount of data produced by proteomics experiments requires effective bioinformatics tools for the integration of data management and data analysis. Here we introduce a suite of tools developed at Vanderbilt University to support production proteomics. We present the Backup Utility Service tool for automated instrument file backup and the ScanSifter tool for data conversion. We also describe a queuing system to coordinate identification pipelines and the File Collector tool for batch copying analytical results. These tools are individually useful but collectively reinforce each other. They are particularly valuable for proteomics core facilities or research institutions that need to manage multiple mass spectrometers. With minor changes, they could support other types of biomolecular resource facilities.
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Protein-selective capture to analyze electrophile adduction of hsp90 by 4-hydroxynonenal.
Chem. Res. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2011
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The analysis of protein modification by electrophiles is a challenging problem. Most reported protein-electrophile adducts have been characterized from in vitro reactions or through affinity capture of the adduct moiety, which enables global analyses but is poorly suited to targeted studies of specific proteins. We employed a targeted molecular probe approach to study modifications of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which regulates diverse client proteins. Noncovalent affinity capture with a biotinyl-geldanamycin probe isolated both isoforms of the native protein (Hsp90? and Hsp90?) from human RKO colorectal cancer cells. Geldanamycin-biotin capture afforded higher purity Hsp90 than did immunoprecipitation and enabled detection of endogenously phosphorylated protein by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We applied this approach to map and quantify adducts formed on Hsp90 by 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) in RKO cells. LC-MS/MS analyses of tryptic digests by identified His(450) and His(490) of Hsp90? as having a 158 Da modification, corresponding to NaBH(4)-reduced HNE adducts. Five histidine residues were also adducted on Hsp90?: His(171), His(442), His(458), His(625), and His(632). The rates of adduction at these sites were determined with Hsp90 protein in vitro and with Hsp90 in HNE-treated cells with a LC-MS/MS-based, label-free relative quantitation method. During in vitro and cell treatment with HNE, residues on Hsp90? and Hsp90? displayed adduction rates ranging from 3.0 × 10(-5) h(-1) to 1.08 ± 0.17 h(-1). Within the middle client-binding domain of Hsp90?, residue His(450) demonstrated the most rapid adduction with k(obs) of 1.08 ± 0.17 h(-1) in HNE-treated cells. The homologous residue on Hsp90?, His(442), was adducted more rapidly than the N-terminal residue, His(171), despite very similar predicted pK(a) values of both residues. The Hsp90 middle client-binding domain thus may play a signicant role in HNE-mediated disruption of Hsp90-client protein interactions. The results illustrate the utility of a protein-selective affinity capture approach for targeted analysis of electrophile adducts and their biological effects.
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Final report of the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel safety assessment of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), methyl methacrylate crosspolymer, and methyl methacrylate/glycol dimethacrylate crosspolymer.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2011
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Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and related cosmetic ingredients methyl methacrylate crosspolymer and methyl methacrylate/glycol dimethacrylate crosspolymer are polymers that function as film formers and viscosity-increasing agents in cosmetics. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) determination of safety of PMMA use in several medical devices, which included human and animal safety data, was used as the basis of safety of PMMA and related polymers in cosmetics by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel.  The PMMA used in cosmetics is substantially the same as in medical devices.  The Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentrations as described in this safety assessment.
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Amended safety assessment of Sesamum indicum (sesame) seed oil, hydrogenated sesame seed oil, Sesamum indicum (sesame) oil unsaponifiables, and sodium sesameseedate.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2011
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Sesamum indicum (sesame) seed oil and related cosmetic ingredients are derived from Sesamum indicum. Sesamum indicum (sesame) seed oil, sesamum indicum (sesame) oil unsaponifiables, and hydrogenated sesame seed oil function as conditioning agents. Sodium sesameseedate functions as a cleansing agent, emulsifying agent, and a nonaqueous viscosity increasing agent. These ingredients are neither skin irritants, sensitizers, teratogens, nor carcinogens at exposures that would result from cosmetic use. Both animal and human data relevant to the cosmetic use of these ingredients were reviewed. The CIR Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration as described in this safety assessment.
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Relating protein adduction to gene expression changes: a systems approach.
Mol Biosyst
PUBLISHED: 05-19-2011
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Modification of proteins by reactive electrophiles such as the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) plays a critical role in oxidant-associated human diseases. However, little is known about protein adduction and the mechanism by which protein damage elicits adaptive effects and toxicity. We developed a systems approach for relating protein adduction to gene expression changes through the integration of protein adduction, gene expression, protein-DNA interaction, and protein-protein interaction data. Using a random walk strategy, we expanded a list of responsive transcription factors inferred from gene expression studies to upstream signaling networks, which in turn allowed overlaying protein adduction data on the network for the prediction of stress sensors and their associated regulatory mechanisms. We demonstrated the general applicability of transcription factor-based signaling network inference using 103 known pathways. Applying our workflow on gene expression and protein adduction data from HNE-treatment not only rediscovered known mechanisms of electrophile stress but also generated novel hypotheses regarding protein damage sensors. Although developed for analyzing protein adduction data, the framework can be easily adapted for phosphoproteomics and other types of protein modification data.
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Mechlorethamine-induced DNA-protein cross-linking in human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2011
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Antitumor nitrogen mustards, such as bis(2-chloroethyl)methylamine (mechlorethamine), are useful chemotherapeutic agents with a long history of clinical application. The antitumor effects of nitrogen mustards are attributed to their ability to induce DNA-DNA and DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) that block DNA replication. In the present work, a mass spectrometry-based methodology was employed to characterize in vivo DNA-protein cross-linking following treatment of human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells with cytotoxic concentrations of mechlorethamine. A combination of mass spectrometry-based proteomics and immunological detection was used to identify 38 nuclear proteins that were covalently cross-linked to chromosomal DNA following treatment with mechlorethamine. Isotope dilution HPLC-ESI(+)-MS/MS analysis of total proteolytic digests revealed a concentration-dependent formation of N-[2-(S-cysteinyl)ethyl]-N-[2-(guan-7-yl)ethyl]methylamine (Cys-N7G-EMA) conjugates, indicating that mechlorethamine cross-links cysteine thiols within proteins to N-7 positions of guanine in DNA.
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A bioinformatics workflow for variant peptide detection in shotgun proteomics.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2011
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Shotgun proteomics data analysis usually relies on database search. However, commonly used protein sequence databases do not contain information on protein variants and thus prevent variant peptides and proteins from been identified. Including known coding variations into protein sequence databases could help alleviate this problem. Based on our recently published human Cancer Proteome Variation Database, we have created a protein sequence database that comprehensively annotates thousands of cancer-related coding variants collected in the Cancer Proteome Variation Database as well as noncancer-specific ones from the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Database (dbSNP). Using this database, we then developed a data analysis workflow for variant peptide identification in shotgun proteomics. The high risk of false positive variant identifications was addressed by a modified false discovery rate estimation method. Analysis of colorectal cancer cell lines SW480, RKO, and HCT-116 revealed a total of 81 peptides that contain either noncancer-specific or cancer-related variations. Twenty-three out of 26 variants randomly selected from the 81 were confirmed by genomic sequencing. We further applied the workflow on data sets from three individual colorectal tumor specimens. A total of 204 distinct variant peptides were detected, and five carried known cancer-related mutations. Each individual showed a specific pattern of cancer-related mutations, suggesting potential use of this type of information for personalized medicine. Compatibility of the workflow has been tested with four popular database search engines including Sequest, Mascot, X!Tandem, and MyriMatch. In summary, we have developed a workflow that effectively uses existing genomic data to enable variant peptide detection in proteomics.
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Methods for peptide and protein quantitation by liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2011
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Liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry of peptides using stable isotope dilution (SID) provides a powerful tool for targeted protein quantitation. However, the high cost of labeled peptide standards for SID poses an obstacle to multiple reaction monitoring studies. We compared SID to a labeled reference peptide (LRP) method, which uses a single labeled peptide as a reference standard for all measured peptides, and a label-free (LF) approach, in which quantitation is based on analysis of un-normalized peak areas for detected MRM transitions. We analyzed peptides from the Escherichia coli proteins alkaline phosphatase and ?-galactosidase spiked into lysates from human colon adenocarcinoma RKO cells. We also analyzed liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry data from a recently published interlaboratory study by the National Cancer Institute Clinical Proteomic Technology Assessment for Cancer network (Addona et al. (2009) Nat. Biotechnol. 27: 633-641), in which unlabeled and isotopically labeled synthetic peptides or their corresponding proteins were spiked into human plasma. SID displayed the highest correlation coefficients and lowest coefficient of variation in regression analyses of both peptide and protein spike studies. In protein spike experiments, median coefficient of variation values were about 10% for SID and 20-30% for LRP and LF methods. Power calculations indicated that differences in measurement error between the methods have much less impact on measured protein expression differences than biological variation. All three methods detected significant (p < 0.05) differential expression of three endogenous proteins in a test set of 10 pairs of human lung tumor and control tissues. Further, the LRP and LF methods both detected significant differences (p < 0.05) in levels of seven biomarker candidates between tumors and controls in the same set of lung tissue samples. The data indicate that the LRP and LF methods provide cost-effective alternatives to SID for many quantitative liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry applications.
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Sequence tagging reveals unexpected modifications in toxicoproteomics.
Chem. Res. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2011
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Toxicoproteomic samples are rich in posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Identifying these modifications via standard database searching can incur significant performance penalties. Here, we describe the latest developments in TagRecon, an algorithm that leverages inferred sequence tags to identify modified peptides in toxicoproteomic data sets. TagRecon identifies known modifications more effectively than the MyriMatch database search engine. TagRecon outperformed state of the art software in recognizing unanticipated modifications from LTQ, Orbitrap, and QTOF data sets. We developed user-friendly software for detecting persistent mass shifts from samples. We follow a three-step strategy for detecting unanticipated PTMs in samples. First, we identify the proteins present in the sample with a standard database search. Next, identified proteins are interrogated for unexpected PTMs with a sequence tag-based search. Finally, additional evidence is gathered for the detected mass shifts with a refinement search. Application of this technology on toxicoproteomic data sets revealed unintended cross-reactions between proteins and sample processing reagents. Twenty-five proteins in rat liver showed signs of oxidative stress when exposed to potentially toxic drugs. These results demonstrate the value of mining toxicoproteomic data sets for modifications.
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Amended safety assessment of dodecylbenzenesulfonate, decylbenzenesulfonate, and tridecylbenzenesulfonate salts as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2010
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Sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate is one of a group of salts of alkylbenzene sulfonates used in cosmetics as surfactant-cleansing agents. Sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate is soluble in water and partially soluble in alcohol, with dermal absorption dependent on pH. Dodecylbenzenesulfonate salts are not toxic in single-dose oral and dermal animal tests, and no systemic toxicities were observed in repeat-dose dermal animal studies. In dermal animal studies, no evidence of reproductive or developmental toxicity was reported. At 15% concentrations, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate was severely irritating to rabbit skin. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel concluded that the irritant properties of these ingredients are similar to those of other detergents, with severity dependent on concentration and pH. Products containing these ingredients should be formulated to ensure that the irritancy potential is minimized.
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Final amended safety assessment of hydroquinone as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2010
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Hydroquinone is an aromatic compound that functions in cosmetics as an antioxidant, fragrance, reducing agent, or polymerization inhibitor. Hydroquinone is also used as a skin bleaching agent. Safety and toxicity information indicate that hydroquinone is dermally absorbed in humans from both aqueous and alcoholic formulations and is excreted mainly as the glucuronide or sulfate conjugates. Hydroquinone is associated with altered immune function in vitro and in vivo in animals and an increased incidence of renal tubule cell tumors and leukemia in F344 rats, but the relevance to humans is uncertain. Quantitatively, however, the use of hydroquinone in cosmetics is unlikely to result in renal neoplasia through this mode of action. Thus, hydroquinone is safe at concentrations of ?1% in hair dyes and is safe for use in nail adhesives. Hydroquinone should not be used in other leave-on cosmetics.
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Final report of the safety assessment of Kojic acid as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2010
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Kojic acid functions as an antioxidant in cosmetic products. Kojic acid was not a toxicant in acute, chronic, reproductive, and genotoxicity studies. While some animal data suggested tumor promotion and weak carcinogenicity, kojic acid is slowly absorbed into the circulation from human skin and likely would not reach the threshold at which these effects were seen. The available human sensitization data supported the safety of kojic acid at a use concentration of 2% in leave-on cosmetics. Kojic acid depigmented black guinea pig skin at a concentration of 4%, but this effect was not seen at 1%. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that the 2 end points of concern, dermal sensitization and skin lightening, would not be seen at use concentrations below 1%; therefore, this ingredient is safe for use in cosmetic products up to that level.
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Final report of the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel amended safety assessment of Calendula officinalis-derived cosmetic ingredients.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2010
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Calendula officinalis extract, C officinalis flower, C officinalis flower extract, C officinalis flower oil, and C officinalis seed oil are cosmetic ingredients derived from C officinalis. These ingredients may contain minerals, carbohydrates, lipids, phenolic acids, flavonoids, tannins, coumarins, sterols and steroids, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, triterpenes, tocopherols, quinones, amino acids, and resins. These ingredients were not significantly toxic in single-dose oral studies using animals. The absence of reproductive/developmental toxicity was inferred from repeat-dose studies of coriander oil, with a similar composition. Overall, these ingredients were not genotoxic. They also were not irritating, sensitizing, or photosensitizing in animal or clinical tests but may be mild ocular irritants. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe for use in cosmetics in the practices of use and concentration given in this amended safety assessment.
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Cysteinyl peptide capture for shotgun proteomics: global assessment of chemoselective fractionation.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2010
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The complexity of cell and tissue proteomes presents one of the most significant technical challenges in proteomic biomarker discovery. Multidimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based shotgun proteomics can be coupled with selective enrichment of cysteinyl peptides (Cys-peptides) to reduce sample complexity and increase proteome coverage. Here we evaluated the impact of Cys-peptide enrichment on global proteomic inventories. We employed a new cleavable thiol-reactive biotinylating probe, N-(2-(2-(2-(2-(3-(1-hydroxy-2-oxo-2-phenylethyl)phenoxy)acetamido)ethoxy)-ethoxy)ethyl)-5-(2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl)pentanamide (IBB), to capture Cys-peptides after digestion. Treatment of tryptic digests with the IBB reagent followed by streptavidin capture and mild alkaline hydrolysis releases a highly purified population of Cys-peptides with a residual S-carboxymethyl tag. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) followed by LC-MS/MS of Cys-peptides significantly expanded proteome coverage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and in human colon carcinoma RKO cells. IBB-based fractionation enhanced detection of Cys-proteins in direct proportion to their cysteine content. The degree of enrichment typically was 2-8-fold but ranged up to almost 20-fold for a few proteins. Published copy number annotation for the yeast proteome enabled benchmarking of MS/MS spectral count data to yeast protein abundance and revealed selective enrichment of cysteine-rich, lower abundance proteins. Spectral count data further established this relationship in RKO cells. Enhanced detection of low abundance proteins was due to the chemoselectivity of Cys-peptide capture, rather than simplification of the peptide mixture through fractionation.
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Depletion of abundant plasma proteins and limitations of plasma proteomics.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2010
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Immunoaffinity depletion with antibodies to the top 7 or top 14 high-abundance plasma proteins is used to enhance detection of lower abundance proteins in both shotgun and targeted proteomic analyses. We evaluated the effects of top 7/top 14 immunodepletion on the shotgun proteomic analysis of human plasma. Our goal was to evaluate the impact of immunodepletion on detection of proteins across detectable ranges of abundance. The depletion columns afforded highly repeatable and efficient plasma protein fractionation. Relatively few nontargeted proteins were captured by the depletion columns. Analyses of unfractionated and immunodepleted plasma by peptide isoelectric focusing (IEF), followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), demonstrated enrichment of nontargeted plasma proteins by an average of 4-fold, as assessed by MS/MS spectral counting. Either top 7 or top 14 immunodepletion resulted in a 25% increase in identified proteins compared to unfractionated plasma. Although 23 low-abundance (<10 ng mL(-1)) plasma proteins were detected, they accounted for only 5-6% of total protein identifications in immunodepleted plasma. In both unfractionated and immunodepleted plasma, the 50 most abundant plasma proteins accounted for 90% of cumulative spectral counts and precursor ion intensities, leaving little capacity to sample lower abundance proteins. Untargeted proteomic analyses using current LC-MS/MS platforms-even with immunodepletion-cannot be expected to efficiently discover low-abundance, disease-specific biomarkers in plasma.
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DNA-protein cross-linking by 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2010
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1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB) is a strongly genotoxic diepoxide hypothesized to be the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of the common industrial chemical and environmental carcinogen 1,3-butadiene. DEB is a bis-electrophile capable of cross-linking cellular biomolecules to form DNA-DNA and DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs), which are thought to play a central role in its biological activity. Previous studies with recombinant proteins have shown that the biological outcomes of DEB-induced DPCs are strongly influenced by protein identities. The present work combines affinity capture methodology with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and immunological detection to identify the proteins that form DPCs in nuclear extracts from human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells. We identified 39 human proteins that form covalent DPCs in the presence of DEB. DNA-protein cross-linking efficiency following treatment with 25 mM DEB was 2-12%, depending on protein identity. High-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI+-MS/MS) analysis of the total proteolytic digests of cross-linked proteins revealed the presence of 1-(S-cysteinyl)-4-(guan-7-yl)-2,3-butanediol conjugates, suggesting that DEB forms DPCs between cysteine thiols within proteins and the N-7 guanine positions within DNA.
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Final safety assessment of thiodipropionic acid and its dialkyl esters as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2010
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Dilauryl thiodipropionate (DLTDP), dicetyl thiodipropionate, dimyristyl thiodipropionate, distearyl thiodipropionate, and ditridecyl thiodipropionate are dialkyl esters of their respective alcohols and thiodipropionic acid (TDPA) used in cosmetics. Ingested DLTDP was excreted in the urine as TDPA. Single-dose acute oral and parenteral studies and subchronic and chronic repeated dose oral studies did not suggest significant toxicity. Neither DLTDP nor TDPA was irritating to animal skin or eyes and they were not sensitizers. TDPA was neither a teratogen nor a reproductive toxicant. Genotoxicity studies were negative for TDPA and DLTDP. Clinical testing demonstrated some evidence of irritation but no sensitization or photosensitization. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel considered that the data from DLTDP reasonably may be extrapolated to the other dialkyl esters and concluded that these ingredients were safe for use in cosmetic products that are formulated to be nonirritating.
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Comparative shotgun proteomics using spectral count data and quasi-likelihood modeling.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2010
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Shotgun proteomics provides the most powerful analytical platform for global inventory of complex proteomes using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and allows a global analysis of protein changes. Nevertheless, sampling of complex proteomes by current shotgun proteomics platforms is incomplete, and this contributes to variability in assessment of peptide and protein inventories by spectral counting approaches. Thus, shotgun proteomics data pose challenges in comparing proteomes from different biological states. We developed an analysis strategy using quasi-likelihood Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM), included in a graphical interface software package (QuasiTel) that reads standard output from protein assemblies created by IDPicker, an HTML-based user interface to query shotgun proteomic data sets. This approach was compared to four other statistical analysis strategies: Student t test, Wilcoxon rank test, Fishers Exact test, and Poisson-based GLM. We analyzed the performance of these tests to identify differences in protein levels based on spectral counts in a shotgun data set in which equimolar amounts of 48 human proteins were spiked at different levels into whole yeast lysates. Both GLM approaches and the Fisher Exact test performed adequately, each with their unique limitations. We subsequently compared the proteomes of normal tonsil epithelium and HNSCC using this approach and identified 86 proteins with differential spectral counts between normal tonsil epithelium and HNSCC. We selected 18 proteins from this comparison for verification of protein levels between the individual normal and tumor tissues using liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM-MS). This analysis confirmed the magnitude and direction of the protein expression differences in all 6 proteins for which reliable data could be obtained. Our analysis demonstrates that shotgun proteomic data sets from different tissue phenotypes are sufficiently rich in quantitative information and that statistically significant differences in proteins spectral counts reflect the underlying biology of the samples.
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Use of dimedone-based chemical probes for sulfenic acid detection methods to visualize and identify labeled proteins.
Meth. Enzymol.
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2010
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Reversible thiol modification is a major component of the modulation of cell-signaling pathways by reactive oxygen species. Hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, or lipid hydroperoxides are all able to oxidize cysteines to form cysteine sulfenic acids; this reactive intermediate can be directly reduced to thiol by cellular reductants such as thioredoxin or further participate in disulfide bond formation with glutathione or cysteine residues in the same or another protein. To identify the direct protein targets of cysteine modification and the conditions under which they are oxidized, a series of dimedone-based reagents linked to affinity or fluorescent tags have been developed that specifically alkylate and trap cysteine sulfenic acids. In this chapter, we provide detailed methods using one of our biotin-tagged reagents, DCP-Bio1, to identify and monitor proteins that are oxidized in vitro and in vivo. Using streptavidin-linked agarose beads, this biotin-linked reagent can be used to affinity capture labeled proteins. Stringent washing of the beads prior to elution minimizes the contamination of the enriched material with unlabeled proteins through coimmunoprecipitation or nonspecific binding. In particular, we suggest including DTT in one of the washes to remove proteins covalently linked to biotinylated proteins through a disulfide bond, except in cases where these linked proteins are of interest. We also provide methods for targeted approaches monitoring cysteine oxidation in individual proteins, global approaches to follow total cysteine oxidation in the cell, and guidelines for proteomic analyses to identify novel proteins with redox sensitive cysteines.
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Skyline: an open source document editor for creating and analyzing targeted proteomics experiments.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2010
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Skyline is a Windows client application for targeted proteomics method creation and quantitative data analysis. It is open source and freely available for academic and commercial use. The Skyline user interface simplifies the development of mass spectrometer methods and the analysis of data from targeted proteomics experiments performed using selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Skyline supports using and creating MS/MS spectral libraries from a wide variety of sources to choose SRM filters and verify results based on previously observed ion trap data. Skyline exports transition lists to and imports the native output files from Agilent, Applied Biosystems, Thermo Fisher Scientific and Waters triple quadrupole instruments, seamlessly connecting mass spectrometer output back to the experimental design document. The fast and compact Skyline file format is easily shared, even for experiments requiring many sample injections. A rich array of graphs displays results and provides powerful tools for inspecting data integrity as data are acquired, helping instrument operators to identify problems early. The Skyline dynamic report designer exports tabular data from the Skyline document model for in-depth analysis with common statistical tools.
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Analytical validation of protein-based multiplex assays: a workshop report by the NCI-FDA interagency oncology task force on molecular diagnostics.
Clin. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 12-10-2009
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Clinical proteomics has the potential to enable the early detection of cancer through the development of multiplex assays that can inform clinical decisions. However, there has been some uncertainty among translational researchers and developers as to the specific analytical measurement criteria needed to validate protein-based multiplex assays. To begin to address the causes of this uncertainty, a day-long workshop titled "Interagency Oncology Task Force Molecular Diagnostics Workshop" was held in which members of the proteomics and regulatory communities discussed many of the analytical evaluation issues that the field should address in development of protein-based multiplex assays for clinical use. This meeting report explores the issues raised at the workshop and details the recommendations that came out of the days discussions, such as a workshop summary discussing the analytical evaluation issues that specific proteomic technologies should address when seeking US Food and Drug Administration approval.
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Protein-based multiplex assays: mock presubmissions to the US Food and Drug Administration.
Clin. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 12-10-2009
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As a part of ongoing efforts of the NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force subcommittee on molecular diagnostics, members of the Clinical Proteomic Technology Assessment for Cancer program of the National Cancer Institute have submitted 2 protein-based multiplex assay descriptions to the Office of In Vitro Diagnostic Device Evaluation and Safety, US Food and Drug Administration. The objective was to evaluate the analytical measurement criteria and studies needed to validate protein-based multiplex assays. Each submission described a different protein-based platform: a multiplex immunoaffinity mass spectrometry platform for protein quantification, and an immunological array platform quantifying glycoprotein isoforms. Submissions provided a mutually beneficial way for members of the proteomics and regulatory communities to identify the analytical issues that the field should address when developing protein-based multiplex clinical assays.
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Interlaboratory study characterizing a yeast performance standard for benchmarking LC-MS platform performance.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 10-26-2009
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Optimal performance of LC-MS/MS platforms is critical to generating high quality proteomics data. Although individual laboratories have developed quality control samples, there is no widely available performance standard of biological complexity (and associated reference data sets) for benchmarking of platform performance for analysis of complex biological proteomes across different laboratories in the community. Individual preparations of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome have been used extensively by laboratories in the proteomics community to characterize LC-MS platform performance. The yeast proteome is uniquely attractive as a performance standard because it is the most extensively characterized complex biological proteome and the only one associated with several large scale studies estimating the abundance of all detectable proteins. In this study, we describe a standard operating protocol for large scale production of the yeast performance standard and offer aliquots to the community through the National Institute of Standards and Technology where the yeast proteome is under development as a certified reference material to meet the long term needs of the community. Using a series of metrics that characterize LC-MS performance, we provide a reference data set demonstrating typical performance of commonly used ion trap instrument platforms in expert laboratories; the results provide a basis for laboratories to benchmark their own performance, to improve upon current methods, and to evaluate new technologies. Additionally, we demonstrate how the yeast reference, spiked with human proteins, can be used to benchmark the power of proteomics platforms for detection of differentially expressed proteins at different levels of concentration in a complex matrix, thereby providing a metric to evaluate and minimize pre-analytical and analytical variation in comparative proteomics experiments.
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Performance metrics for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry systems in proteomics analyses.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 10-16-2009
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A major unmet need in LC-MS/MS-based proteomics analyses is a set of tools for quantitative assessment of system performance and evaluation of technical variability. Here we describe 46 system performance metrics for monitoring chromatographic performance, electrospray source stability, MS1 and MS2 signals, dynamic sampling of ions for MS/MS, and peptide identification. Applied to data sets from replicate LC-MS/MS analyses, these metrics displayed consistent, reasonable responses to controlled perturbations. The metrics typically displayed variations less than 10% and thus can reveal even subtle differences in performance of system components. Analyses of data from interlaboratory studies conducted under a common standard operating procedure identified outlier data and provided clues to specific causes. Moreover, interlaboratory variation reflected by the metrics indicates which system components vary the most between laboratories. Application of these metrics enables rational, quantitative quality assessment for proteomics and other LC-MS/MS analytical applications.
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Efficacy of cetuximab in the treatment of Menetriers disease.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2009
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Ménétriers disease is a rare premalignant disorder of the stomach with no proven effective medical therapy. Increased epidermal growth factor receptor signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Ménétriers disease. We conducted a single-arm clinical trial with cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, in nine individuals with clinically and histologically documented severe Ménétriers disease that impaired quality of life to the extent that gastrectomy was being considered. Of the seven patients who completed the 1-month course of treatment, all showed statistically significant improvement both clinically (quality-of-life indices) and biochemically (increased parietal cell mass and gastric acidity). Furthermore, all seven patients who completed the 1-month trial elected to continue treatment, and four subsequently showed near-complete histological remission. Cetuximab should be considered as first-line therapy for Ménétriers disease.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.