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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Shotgun proteomics to unravel the complexity of the Leishmania infantum exoproteome and the relative abundance of its constituents.
Mol. Biochem. Parasitol.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2014
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The exoproteome of some Leishmania species has revealed important insights into host-parasite interaction, paving the way for the proposal of novel disease-oriented interventions. The focus of the present investigation constituted the molecular profile of the L. infantum exoproteome revealed by a shotgun proteomic approach. Promastigotes under logarithmic phase of growth were obtained and harvested by centrifugation at different time points. Cell integrity was evaluated through the counting of viable parasites using propidium iodide labeling, followed by flow cytometry analysis. The 6h culture supernatant, operationally defined here as exoproteome, was then conditioned to in solution digestion and the resulting peptides submitted to mass spectrometry. A total of 102 proteins were identified and categorized according to their cellular function. Their relative abundance index (emPAI) allowed inference that the L. infantum exoproteome is a complex mixture dominated by molecules particularly involved in nucleotide metabolism and antioxidant activity. Bioinformatic analyses support that approximately 60% of the identified proteins are secreted, of which, 85% possibly reach the extracellular milieu by means of non-classic pathways. At last, sera from naturally infected animals, carriers of differing clinical forms of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis (CVL), were used to test the immunogenicity associated to the L. infantum exoproteome. Western blotting experiments revealed that this sub-proteome was useful at discriminating symptomatic animals from those exhibiting other clinical forms of the disease. Collectively, the molecular characterization of the L. infantum exoproteome and the preliminary immunoproteomic assays opened up new research avenues related to treatment, prognosis and diagnosis of CVL.
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Molecular diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis: a comparative study of three methods using skin and spleen from dogs with natural Leishmania infantum infection.
Vet. Parasitol.
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2013
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Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its variations represent highly sensitive and specific methods for Leishmania DNA detection and subsequent canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) diagnosis. The aim of this work was to compare three different molecular diagnosis techniques (conventional PCR [cPCR], seminested PCR [snPCR], and quantitative PCR [qPCR]) in samples of skin and spleen from 60 seropositive dogs by immunofluorescence antibody test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Parasitological analysis was conducted by culture of bone marrow aspirate and optical microscopic assessment of ear skin and spleen samples stained with Giemsa, the standard tests for CVL diagnosis. The primers L150/L152 and LINR4/LIN17/LIN19 were used to amplify the conserved region of the Leishmania kDNA minicircle in the cPCR, and snPCR and qPCR were performed using the DNA polymerase gene (DNA pol ?) primers from Leishmania infantum. The parasitological analysis revealed parasites in 61.7% of the samples. Sensitivities were 89.2%, 86.5%, and 97.3% in the skin and 81.1%, 94.6%, and 100.0% in spleen samples used for cPCR, snPCR, and qPCR, respectively. We demonstrated that the qPCR method was the best technique to detect L. infantum in both skin and spleen samples. However, we recommend the use of skin due to the high sensitivity and sampling being less invasive.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.