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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Genotypic susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for Amikacin and Kanamycin resistance using a rapid Sloppy Molecular Beacon based assay identifies more cases of low level drug resistance than phenotypic Lowenstein-Jensen testing.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-24-2014
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Resistance to Amikacin (AMK) and Kanamycin (KAN) in clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) strains is largely determined by specific mutations in the rrs gene and eis gene promoter. We developed a rapid, multiplexed Sloppy Molecular Beacon (SMB) assay to identify these mutations and then evaluated assay performance on 603 clinical M.tb DNA samples collected in South Korea. Assay performance was compared to gold-standard phenotypic drug susceptibility tests including Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) absolute concentration, Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tubes (MGIT) and TREK Sensititre® MYCOTB MIC plate (MYCOTB) methods. Target amplicons were also tested for mutations by Sanger sequencing. The SMB assay correctly detected 115/116 mutant and mixed sequences and 487/487 wild type sequences (sensitivity and specificity 99.1 and 100% respectively). Using LJ as the reference, sensitivity and specificity for AMK resistance was 92.2% and 100% respectively; and for KAN resistance was 87.7% and 95.6% respectively. Mutations in the rrs gene were unequivocally associated with high level cross-resistance to AMK and KAN in all three conventional drug susceptibility testing methods. However, eis promoter mutations were associated with KAN resistance using only the MGIT or MYCOTB methods but not the LJ method. No testing method associated eis promoter mutations with AMK resistance. Among the discordant samples with AMK and/or KAN resistance but wild type sequence at the target genes, we discovered four new mutations in the whiB7 5' untranslated (UTR) region in 6/22 samples. All the six samples were resistant to only KAN suggesting the possible role of these whiB7 5' UTR mutations in KAN resistance.
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Prospective cross-sectional evaluation of the small membrane filtration method for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2014
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Smear microscopy has suboptimal sensitivity, and there is a need to improve its performance since it is commonly used to diagnose tuberculosis (TB). We prospectively evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the small membrane filtration (SMF) method, an approach that uses a vacuum manifold and is designed to concentrate bacilli onto a filter that can be examined microscopically. We enrolled hospitalized adults suspected to have pulmonary TB in Kampala, Uganda. We obtained a clinical history and three spontaneously expectorated sputum specimens for smear microscopy (direct, concentrated, and SMF), MGIT (mycobacterial growth indicator tube) 960 and Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) cultures, and Xpert MTB/RIF testing. We performed per-specimen (primary) and per-patient analyses. From October 2012 to June 2013, we enrolled 212 patients (579 sputum specimens). The participants were mostly female (63.2%), and 81.6% were HIV infected; their median CD4 cell count was 47 cells/?l. Overall, 19.0%, 20.4%, 27.1%, 25.2%, and 25.9% of specimens tested positive by direct smear, concentrated smear, MGIT culture, LJ culture, and Xpert test, respectively. In the per-specimen analysis, the sensitivity of the SMF method (48.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 37.4 to 59.6) was lower than those of direct smear (60.9%; 51.4 to 70.5 [P = 0.0001]) and concentrated smear (63.3%; 53.6 to 73.1 [P < 0.0001]). Subgroup analyses showed that SMF performed poorly in specimens having a low volume or low bacterial load. The SMF method performed poorly compared to standard smear techniques and was sensitive to sample preparation techniques. The optimal laboratory SMF protocol may require striking a fine balance between sample dilution and filtration failure rate.
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Phosphorylation of KasB regulates virulence and acid-fastness in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2014
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Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli display two signature features: acid-fast staining and the capacity to induce long-term latent infections in humans. However, the mechanisms governing these two important processes remain largely unknown. Ser/Thr phosphorylation has recently emerged as an important regulatory mechanism allowing mycobacteria to adapt their cell wall structure/composition in response to their environment. Herein, we evaluated whether phosphorylation of KasB, a crucial mycolic acid biosynthetic enzyme, could modulate acid-fast staining and virulence. Tandem mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that phosphorylation of KasB occurred at Thr334 and Thr336 both in vitro and in mycobacteria. Isogenic strains of M. tuberculosis with either a deletion of the kasB gene or a kasB_T334D/T336D allele, mimicking constitutive phosphorylation of KasB, were constructed by specialized linkage transduction. Biochemical and structural analyses comparing these mutants to the parental strain revealed that both mutant strains had mycolic acids that were shortened by 4-6 carbon atoms and lacked trans-cyclopropanation. Together, these results suggested that in M. tuberculosis, phosphorylation profoundly decreases the condensing activity of KasB. Structural/modeling analyses reveal that Thr334 and Thr336 are located in the vicinity of the catalytic triad, which indicates that phosphorylation of these amino acids would result in loss of enzyme activity. Importantly, the kasB_T334D/T336D phosphomimetic and deletion alleles, in contrast to the kasB_T334A/T336A phosphoablative allele, completely lost acid-fast staining. Moreover, assessing the virulence of these strains indicated that the KasB phosphomimetic mutant was attenuated in both immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice following aerosol infection. This attenuation was characterized by the absence of lung pathology. Overall, these results highlight for the first time the role of Ser/Thr kinase-dependent KasB phosphorylation in regulating the later stages of mycolic acid elongation, with important consequences in terms of acid-fast staining and pathogenicity.
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Diagnostic accuracy of a rapid urine lipoarabinomannan test for tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults.
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2014
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In settings of high HIV prevalence, tuberculosis control and patient management are hindered by lack of accurate, rapid tuberculosis diagnostic tests that can be performed at point-of-care. The Determine TB LAM Ag (TB LAM) test is a lateral flow immunochromatographic test for detection of mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in urine. Our objective was to determine sensitivity and specificity of the TB LAM test for tuberculosis diagnosis.
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Clinical utility of a novel molecular assay in various combination strategies with existing methods for diagnosis of HIV-related tuberculosis in Uganda.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Low income, high-tuberculosis burden, countries are considering selective deployment of Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Xpert) due to high cost per test. We compared the diagnostic gain of the Xpert add-on strategy with Xpert replacement strategy for pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis among HIV-infected adults to inform its implementation.
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Importance of cough and M. tuberculosis strain type as risks for increased transmission within households.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The degree to which tuberculosis (TB) is transmitted between persons is variable. Identifying the factors that contribute to transmission could provide new opportunities for TB control. Transmission is influenced by host, bacterial and environmental factors. However, distinguishing their individual effects is problematic because measures of disease severity are tightly correlated, and assessing the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates is complicated by epidemiological and clinical confounders.
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Discordance of tuberculin skin test and interferon gamma release assay in recently exposed household contacts of pulmonary TB cases in Brazil.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Interferon-gamma (IFN-?) release assays (IGRAs) such as the Quantiferon Gold In-tube test are in vitro assays that measure IFN-? release from T cells in response to M. tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific antigens. Unlike the tuberculin skin test (TST), IGRA is specific and able to distinguish Mtb-infection from BCG vaccination. In this study we evaluated the concordance between TST and IGRA and the efficacy of IGRA in diagnosing new Mtb infection in household contacts (HHC) of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases. A total of 357 HHC of TB cases in Vitória, Brazil were studied. A TST was performed within 2 weeks following enrollment of the HHC and if negative a second TST was performed at 8-12 weeks. HHC were categorized as initially TST positive (TST+), persistently TST negative (TST-), or TST converters (TSTc), the latter representative of new infection. IGRA was performed at 8-12 weeks following enrollment and the test results were positive in 82% of TST+, 48% of TSTc, and 12% of TST-, indicating poor concordance between the two test results among HHC in each category. Evaluating CXCL10 levels in a subset of IGRA supernatants or lowering the IGRA cutoff value to define a positive test increased agreement between TST and IGRA test results. However, ROC curves demonstrated that this resulted in a trade-off between sensitivity and specificity of IGRA with respect to TST. Together, the findings suggest that until the basis for the discordance between TST and IGRA is fully understood, it may be necessary to utilize both tests to diagnose new Mtb infection in recently exposed HHC. Operationally, in IGRA negative HHC, it may be useful to employ a lower cutoff value for IGRA to allow closer monitoring for potential conversion.
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Whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals slow growth and low mutation rates during latent infections in humans.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Very little is known about the growth and mutation rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latent infection in humans. However, studies in rhesus macaques have suggested that latent infections have mutation rates that are higher than that observed during active tuberculosis disease. Elevated mutation rates are presumed risk factors for the development of drug resistance. Therefore, the investigation of mutation rates during human latency is of high importance. We performed whole genome mutation analysis of M. tuberculosis isolates from a multi-decade tuberculosis outbreak of the New Zealand Rangipo strain. We used epidemiological and phylogenetic analysis to identify four cases of tuberculosis acquired from the same index case. Two of the tuberculosis cases occurred within two years of exposure and were classified as recently transmitted tuberculosis. Two other cases occurred more than 20 years after exposure and were classified as reactivation of latent M. tuberculosis infections. Mutation rates were compared between the two recently transmitted pairs versus the two latent pairs. Mean mutation rates assuming 20 hour generation times were 5.5 X 10(-10) mutations/bp/generation for recently transmitted tuberculosis and 7.3 X 10(-11) mutations/bp/generation for latent tuberculosis. Generation time versus mutation rate curves were also significantly higher for recently transmitted tuberculosis across all replication rates (p = 0.006). Assuming identical replication and mutation rates among all isolates in the final two years before disease reactivation, the u 20 hr mutation rate attributable to the remaining latent period was 1.6 × 10(-11) mutations/bp/generation, or approximately 30 fold less than that calculated during the two years immediately before disease. Mutations attributable to oxidative stress as might be caused by bacterial exposure to the host immune system were not increased in latent infections. In conclusion, we did not find any evidence to suggest elevated mutation rates during tuberculosis latency in humans, unlike the situation in rhesus macaques.
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Better tests, better care: improved diagnostics for infectious diseases.
Clin. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 11-09-2013
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In this IDSA policy paper, we review the current diagnostic landscape, including unmet needs and emerging technologies, and assess the challenges to the development and clinical integration of improved tests. To fulfill the promise of emerging diagnostics, IDSA presents recommendations that address a host of identified barriers. Achieving these goals will require the engagement and coordination of a number of stakeholders, including Congress, funding and regulatory bodies, public health agencies, the diagnostics industry, healthcare systems, professional societies, and individual clinicians.
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Exploring alternative biomaterials for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV-negative patients by use of the GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-09-2013
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The utility of the GeneXpert MTB/RIF (Xpert) assay for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples has been extensively studied. However, the performance of the Xpert assay as applied to other readily accessible body fluids such as exhaled breath condensate (EBC), saliva, urine, and blood has not been established. We used the Xpert assay to test EBC, saliva, urine, and blood samples from HIV-negative, smear- and culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients for the presence of M. tuberculosis. To compare the ability of the assay to perform bacterial load measurements on sputum samples with versus without sample processing, the assay was also performed on paired direct and processed sputum samples from each patient. The Xpert assay detected M. tuberculosis in none of the 26 EBC samples (sensitivity, 0.0%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.0%, 12.9%), 10 of the 26 saliva samples (sensitivity, 38.5%; 95% CI, 22.4%, 57.5%), 1 of 26 urine samples (sensitivity, 3.8%; 95% CI, 0.7%, 18.9%), and 2 of 24 blood samples (sensitivity, 8.3%; 95% CI, 2.3%, 25.8%). For bacterial load measurements in the different types of sputum samples, the cycle thresholds of the two M. tuberculosis-positive sputum types were well correlated (Spearman correlation of 0.834). This study demonstrates that the Xpert assay should not be routinely used to detect M. tuberculosis in EBC, saliva, urine, or blood samples from HIV-negative patients suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis. As a test of bacterial load, the assay produced similar results when used to test direct versus processed sputum samples. Sputum remains the optimal sample type for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV-negative patients with the Xpert assay.
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Sensititre MYCOTB MIC Plate for Testing Mycobacterium tuberculosis Susceptibility to First- and Second-Line Drugs.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2013
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For Mycobacterium tuberculosis, phenotypic methods for drug susceptibility testing of second-line drugs are poorly standardized and technically challenging. The Sensititre MYCOTB MIC plate (MYCOTB) is a microtiter plate containing lyophilized antibiotics and configured for determination of MICs to first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs. To evaluate the performance of MYCOTB for M. tuberculosis drug susceptibility testing using the Middlebrook 7H10 agar proportion method (APM) as the comparator, we conducted a two-site study using archived M. tuberculosis isolates from Uganda and the Republic of Korea. Thawed isolates were subcultured, and dilutions were inoculated into MYCOTB wells and onto 7H10 agar. MYCOTB results were read at days 7, 10, 14, and 21; APM results were read at 21 days. A total of 222 isolates provided results on both platforms. By APM, 106/222 (47.7%) of isolates were resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampin. Agreement between MYCOTB and APM with respect to susceptibility or resistance was ?92% for 7 of 12 drugs when a strict definition was used and ?96% for 10 of 12 drugs when agreement was defined by allowing a ± one-well range of dilutions around the APM critical concentration. For ethambutol, agreement was 80% to 81%. For moxifloxacin, agreement was 83% to 85%; incorporating existing DNA sequencing information for discrepant analysis raised agreement to 91% to 96%. For MYCOTB, the median time to plate interpretation was 10 days and interreader agreement was ?95% for all drugs. MYCOTB provided reliable results for M. tuberculosis susceptibility testing of first- and second-line drugs except ethambutol, and results were available sooner than those determined by APM.
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Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in blood by use of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2013
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We have developed a novel blood lysis-centrifugation approach for highly sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis detection in large volumes of blood with the Xpert MTB/RIF assay. One through 20 ml of blood was spiked with 0.25 to 10 CFU/ml of the M. tuberculosis surrogate M. bovis BCG. Multiple replicates of each sample were processed by a new lysis-centrifugation method and tested with the Xpert MTB/RIF assay. The assay was very sensitive with increased blood volumes. In the 20-ml samples, BCG was detected in blood spiked with 10, 5, 1, and 0.25 CFU/ml 100, 100, 83, and 57% of the time, respectively, compared to 100, 66, 18, and 18%, of the time, respectively, in 1-ml blood samples. Assay sensitivity was influenced by the type of anticoagulant used, with acid-citrate-dextrose solution B (ACD-B) providing the best results. A limit of detection of 10 CFU/ml was established with BCG spiked into ACD-B-treated blood, and 92, 36, and 33% of the samples with 5, 1, and 0.5 CFU/ml, respectively, were assay positive. The lysis buffer was stable both at room temperature and at 4°C for 2 months. The assay was tested with blood stored for 8 days without a change in sensitivity as measured by cycle threshold. This new assay format extends the capability of the Xpert MTB/RIF test, enabling up to 20 ml of blood to be tested rapidly for the presence of M. tuberculosis. This approach may be a useful method to detect extrapulmonary tuberculosis and the risk of death in immunocompromised patients.
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Evaluation of Xpert MTB/RIF for detection of tuberculosis from blood samples of HIV-infected adults confirms Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia as an indicator of poor prognosis.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2013
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Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of death among HIV-infected adults, in part because of delayed diagnosis and therefore delayed initiation of treatment. Recently, the Gene-Xpert platform, a rapid, PCR-based diagnostic platform, has been validated for the diagnosis of TB with sputum. We have evaluated the Xpert MTB/RIF assay for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia and investigated its impact on clinical outcomes. Consecutive HIV-infected adults with fever and cough presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi, were recruited and followed up for 2 months. At presentation, three sputum samples were examined by smear, culture, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay for the presence of M. tuberculosis and blood was drawn for PCR with Xpert, for mycobacterial culture (Myco/F Lytic), and for aerobic culture. One hundred four patients were recruited, and 44 (43%) were sputum culture positive for M. tuberculosis. Ten were Xpert blood positive, for a sensitivity of 21% and a specificity of 100%. The 2-week mortality rate was significantly higher among patients who were Xpert blood positive than among those who were negative (40% versus 3%; multivariate odds ratio [OR] for death if positive, 44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3 to 662). This effect persisted on assessment of the mortality rate at 2 months (40% versus 11%; OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.3 to 24.6). When screening uncomplicated patients presenting with a productive cough for pulmonary TB, Xpert blood offers no diagnostic advantage over sputum testing. Despite this, Xpert blood positivity is highly predictive of early death and this test rapidly identifies a group of patients in urgent need of initiation of treatment.
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Evolution of high-level ethambutol-resistant tuberculosis through interacting mutations in decaprenylphosphoryl-?-D-arabinose biosynthetic and utilization pathway genes.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2013
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To study the evolution of drug resistance, we genetically and biochemically characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains selected in vitro for ethambutol resistance. Mutations in decaprenylphosphoryl-?-D-arabinose (DPA) biosynthetic and utilization pathway genes Rv3806c, Rv3792, embB and embC accumulated to produce a wide range of ethambutol minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) that depended on mutation type and number. Rv3806c mutations increased DPA synthesis, causing MICs to double from 2 to 4 ?g/ml in a wild-type background and to increase from 16 to 32 ?g/ml in an embB codon 306 mutant background. Synonymous mutations in Rv3792 increased the expression of downstream embC, an ethambutol target, resulting in MICs of 8 ?g/ml. Multistep selection was required for high-level resistance. Mutations in embC or very high embC expression were observed at the highest resistance level. In clinical isolates, Rv3806c mutations were associated with high-level resistance and had multiplicative effects with embB mutations on MICs. Ethambutol resistance is acquired through the acquisition of mutations that interact in complex ways to produce a range of MICs, from those falling below breakpoint values to ones representing high-level resistance.
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Antituberculosis thiophenes define a requirement for Pks13 in mycolic acid biosynthesis.
Nat. Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2013
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We report a new class of thiophene (TP) compounds that kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the previously uncharacterized mechanism of Pks13 inhibition. An F79S mutation near the catalytic Ser55 site in Pks13 conferred TP resistance in M. tuberculosis. Overexpression of wild-type Pks13 resulted in TP resistance, and overexpression of the Pks13(F79S) mutant conferred high resistance. In vitro, TP inhibited fatty acyl-AMP loading onto Pks13. TP inhibited mycolic acid biosynthesis in wild-type M. tuberculosis, but it did so to a much lesser extent in TP-resistant M. tuberculosis. TP treatment was bactericidal and equivalent to treatment with the first-line drug isoniazid, but it was less likely to permit emergent resistance. Combined isoniazid and TP treatment resulted in sterilizing activity. Computational docking identified a possible TP-binding groove within the Pks13 acyl carrier protein domain. This study confirms that M. tuberculosis Pks13 is required for mycolic acid biosynthesis, validates it as a druggable target and demonstrates the therapeutic potential of simultaneously inhibiting multiple targets in the same biosynthetic pathway.
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Optimal Triage Test Characteristics to Improve the Cost-Effectiveness of the Xpert MTB/RIF Assay for TB Diagnosis: A Decision Analysis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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High costs are a limitation to scaling up the Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Xpert) for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in resource-constrained settings. A triaging strategy in which a sensitive but not necessarily highly specific rapid test is used to select patients for Xpert may result in a more affordable diagnostic algorithm. To inform the selection and development of particular diagnostics as a triage test we explored combinations of sensitivity, specificity and cost at which a hypothetical triage test will improve affordability of the Xpert assay.
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A multisite assessment of the quantitative capabilities of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 08-13-2011
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The Xpert MTB/RIF is an automated molecular test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis that estimates bacterial burden by measuring the threshold-cycle (Ct) of its M. tuberculosis-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction. Bacterial burden is an important biomarker for disease severity, infection control risk, and response to therapy.
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Novel inhibitors of InhA efficiently kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 05-31-2011
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Drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has become a serious global health threat, which is now complicated by the emergence of extensively drug-resistant strains. New drugs that are active against drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) are needed. We chose to search for new inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase InhA, the target of the first-line TB drug isoniazid (also known as isonicotinoic acid hydrazide [INH]). A subset of a chemical library, composed of 300 compounds inhibiting Plasmodium falciparum enoyl reductase, was tested against M. tuberculosis. Four compounds were found to inhibit M. tuberculosis growth with MICs ranging from 1 ?M to 10 ?M. Testing of these compounds against M. tuberculosis in vitro revealed that only two compounds (CD39 and CD117) were bactericidal against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. These two compounds were also bactericidal against M. tuberculosis incubated under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, CD39 and CD117 exhibited increased bactericidal activity when used in combination with INH or rifampin, but CD39 was shown to be toxic to eukaryotic cells. The compounds inhibit InhA as well the fatty acid synthase type I, and CD117 was found to also inhibit tuberculostearic acid synthesis. This study provides the TB drug development community with two chemical scaffolds that are suitable for structure-activity relationship study to improve on their cytotoxicities and bactericidal activities in vitro and in vivo.
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Xpert MTB/RIF: a new pillar in diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis?
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2011
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Approximately 10 to 15% of tuberculosis (TB) cases in India are estimated to have extrapulmonary disease, and due to a lack of diagnostic means, they often remain untreated. The early detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and multidrug resistance is a priority in TB diagnosis to improve the successful treatment rate of TB and reduce transmission. The Xpert MTB/RIF (Xpert) test, recently endorsed by the World Health Organization for the detection of pulmonary TB, was evaluated to test its utility in 547 patients with suspected extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Five hundred forty-seven extrapulmonary specimens were split and processed simultaneously for both culture (solid and liquid) and Xpert testing. For culture, the sensitivity was low, 53% (150/283 specimens). Xpert sensitivity and specificity results were assessed in comparison to a composite reference standard made up of smear and culture results and clinical, radiological, and histological findings. The sensitivity of the Xpert assay was 81% (228/283 specimens) (64% [89/138] for smear-negative cases and 96% [139/145] for smear-positive cases), with a specificity of 99.6%. The sensitivity was found to be high for the majority of specimen types (63 to 100%) except for cerebrospinal fluid, the sensitivity of which was 29% (2/7 specimens). The Xpert test correctly identified 98% of phenotypic rifampin (RIF)-resistant cases and 94% of phenotypic RIF-susceptible cases. Sequencing of the 6 discrepant samples resolved 3 of them, resulting in an increased specificity of 98%. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the Xpert test also shows good potential for the diagnosis of extrapulmonary TB and that its ease of use makes it applicable for countries where TB is endemic.
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Feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and effectiveness of decentralised use of the Xpert MTB/RIF test for diagnosis of tuberculosis and multidrug resistance: a multicentre implementation study.
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2011
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The Xpert MTB/RIF test (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) can detect tuberculosis and its multidrug-resistant form with very high sensitivity and specificity in controlled studies, but no performance data exist from district and subdistrict health facilities in tuberculosis-endemic countries. We aimed to assess operational feasibility, accuracy, and effectiveness of implementation in such settings.
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Rapid detection of fluoroquinolone-resistant and heteroresistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by use of sloppy molecular beacons and dual melting-temperature codes in a real-time PCR assay.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-29-2010
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Fluoroquinolones (FQ) are important second-line drugs to treat tuberculosis; however, FQ resistance is an emerging problem. Resistance has been mainly attributed to mutations in a 21-bp region of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrA gene, often called the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). We have developed a simple, rapid, and specific assay to detect FQ resistance-determining QRDR mutations. The assay amplifies the M. tuberculosis gyrA QRDR in an asymmetrical PCR followed by probing with two sloppy molecular beacons (SMBs) spanning the entire QRDR. Mutations are detected by melting temperature (T(m)) shifts that occur when the SMBs bind to mismatched sequences. By testing DNA targets corresponding to all known QRDR mutations, we found that one or both of the SMBs produced a T(m) shift of at least 3.6°C for each mutation, making mutation detection very robust. The assay was also able to identify mixtures of wild-type and mutant DNA, with QRDR mutants identified in samples containing as little as 5 to 10% mutant DNA. The assay was blindly validated for its ability to identify the QRDR mutations on DNA extracted from clinical M. tuberculosis strains. Fifty QRDR wild-type samples, 34 QRDR mutant samples, and 8 heteroresistant samples containing mixtures of wild-type and mutant DNA were analyzed. The results showed 100% concordance to conventional DNA sequencing, including a complete identification of all of the mixtures. This SMB T(m) shift assay will be a valuable molecular tool to rapidly detect FQ resistance and to detect the emergence of FQ heteroresistance in clinical samples from tuberculosis patients.
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Rapid molecular detection of tuberculosis and rifampin resistance.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2010
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Global control of tuberculosis is hampered by slow, insensitive diagnostic methods, particularly for the detection of drug-resistant forms and in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Early detection is essential to reduce the death rate and interrupt transmission, but the complexity and infrastructure needs of sensitive methods limit their accessibility and effect.
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Containment of bioaerosol infection risk by the Xpert MTB/RIF assay and its applicability to point-of-care settings.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2010
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The recently introduced Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Xpert) has point-of-care potential, but its capacity for biohazard containment remained to be studied. We compared the bioaerosols generated by the Xpert assay to acid-fast bacillus (AFB) microscope slide smear preparation. The Xpert assay sample treatment reagent (SR) was also studied for its sterilizing capacity, stability, and effect on assay sensitivity after prolonged treatment. During the preparation of AFB smears, sputum samples spiked with Mycobacterium bovis BCG at 5 × 10(8) CFU/ml produced 16 and 325 CFU/m(3) air measured with an Andersen impactor or BioSampler, respectively. In contrast, neither the sample preparation steps for the Xpert assay nor its automated processing produced any culturable bioaerosols. In testing of SR sterilizing capacity, clinical sputum samples from strongly smear-positive tuberculosis patients treated with SR at a 2:1 ratio eliminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth in all but 1/39 or 3/45 samples cultured on solid or liquid medium, respectively. These few unsterilized samples had a mean 13.1-day delay in the time to positive culture. SR treatment at a 3:1 ratio eliminated growth in all samples. SR retained a greater than 6-log-unit killing capacity despite storage at temperatures spanning 4 to 45°C for at least 3 months. The effect of prolonged SR sample treatment was also studied. Spiked sputum samples could be incubated in SR for up to 3 days without affecting Xpert sensitivity for M. tuberculosis detection and up to 8 h without affecting specificity for rifampin resistance detection. These results suggest that benchtop use of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay limits infection risk to the user.
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Mycobacterium tuberculosis dihydrofolate reductase is not a target relevant to the antitubercular activity of isoniazid.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 06-21-2010
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Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-acyl-ACP reductase (InhA) has been demonstrated to be the primary target of isoniazid (INH). Recently, it was postulated that M. tuberculosis dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is also a target of INH, based on the findings that a 4R-INH-NADP adduct synthesized from INH by a nonenzymatic approach showed strong inhibition of DHFR in vitro, and overexpression of M. tuberculosis dfrA in M. smegmatis conferred a 2-fold increase of resistance to INH. In the present study, a plasmid expressing M. tuberculosis dfrA was transformed into M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis strains, respectively. The transformant strains were tested for their resistance to INH. Compared to the wild-type strains, overexpression of dfrA in M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis did not confer any resistance to INH based on the MIC values. Similar negative results were obtained with 14 other overexpressed proteins that have been proposed to bind some form of INH-NAD(P) adduct. An Escherichia coli cell-based system was designed that allowed coexpression of both M. tuberculosis katG and dfrA genes in the presence of INH. The DHFR protein isolated from the experimental sample was not found bound with any INH-NADP adduct by enzyme inhibition assay and mass spectroscopic analysis. We also used whole-genome sequencing to determine whether polymorphisms in dfrA could be detected in six INH-resistant clinical isolates known to lack mutations in inhA and katG, but no such mutations were found. The dfrA overexpression experiments, together with the biochemical and sequencing studies, conclusively demonstrate that DHFR is not a target relevant to the antitubercular activity of INH.
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Evaluation of the analytical performance of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2010
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We performed the first studies of analytic sensitivity, analytic specificity, and dynamic range for the new Xpert MTB/RIF assay, a nucleic acid amplification-based diagnostic system that detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rifampin (RIF) resistance in under 2 h. The sensitivity of the assay was tested with 79 phylogenetically and geographically diverse M. tuberculosis isolates, including 42 drug-susceptible isolates and 37 RIF-resistant isolates containing 13 different rpoB mutations or mutation combinations. The specificity of the assay was tested with 89 nontuberculosis bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The Xpert MTB/RIF assay correctly identified all 79 M. tuberculosis isolates and correctly excluded all 89 nontuberculosis isolates. RIF resistance was correctly identified in all 37 resistant isolates and in none of the 42 susceptible isolates. Dynamic range was assessed by adding 10(2) to 10(7) CFU of M. tuberculosis into M. tuberculosis-negative sputum samples. The assay showed a log-linear relationship between cycle threshold and input CFU over the entire concentration range. Resistance detection in the presence of different mixtures of RIF-resistant and RIF-susceptible DNA was assessed. Resistance detection was dependent on the particular mutation and required between 65% and 100% mutant DNA to be present in the sample for 95% certainty of resistance detection. Finally, we studied whether assay specificity could be affected by cross-contaminating amplicons generated by the GenoType MTBDRplus assay. M. tuberculosis was not detected until at least 10(8) copies of an MTBDRplus amplicon were spiked into 1 ml of sputum, suggesting that false-positive results would be unlikely to occur.
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Mutations in extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis that do not code for known drug-resistance mechanisms.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2010
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Highly lethal outbreaks of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis are increasing. Whole-genome sequencing of KwaZulu-Natal MDR and XDR outbreak strains prevalent in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients by the Broad Institute identified 22 novel mutations which were unique to the XDR genome or shared only by the MDR and XDR genomes and not already known to be associated with drug resistance.
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K2 serotype Klebsiella pneumoniae causing a liver abscess associated with infective endocarditis.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-09-2009
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Klebsiella pneumoniae primary liver abscess (KPLA) is an emerging disease that is associated with distant septic complications. We report the first case of KPLA associated with infective endocarditis. The K. pneumoniae strain was a hypermucoid K2 serotype carrying the rmpA virulence-associated gene.
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Rapid universal identification of bacterial pathogens from clinical cultures by using a novel sloppy molecular beacon melting temperature signature technique.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-18-2009
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A real-time PCR assay with the ability to rapidly identify all pathogenic bacteria would have widespread medical utility. Current real-time PCR technologies cannot accomplish this task due to severe limitations in multiplexing ability. To this end, we developed a new assay system which supports very high degrees of multiplexing. We developed a new class of mismatch-tolerant "sloppy" molecular beacons, modified them to provide an extended hybridization range, and developed a multiprobe, multimelting temperature (T(m)) signature approach to bacterial species identification. Sloppy molecular beacons were exceptionally versatile, and they were able to generate specific T(m) values for DNA sequences that differed by as little as one nucleotide to as many as 23 polymorphisms. Combining the T(m) values generated by several probe-target hybrids resulted in T(m) signatures that served as highly accurate sequence identifiers. Using this method, PCR assays with as few as six sloppy molecular beacons targeting bacterial 16S rRNA gene segments could reproducibly classify 119 different sequence types of pathogenic and commensal bacteria, representing 64 genera, into 111 T(m) signature types. Blinded studies using the assay to identify the bacteria present in 270 patient-derived clinical cultures including 106 patient blood cultures showed a 95 to 97% concordance with conventional methods. Importantly, no bacteria were misidentified; rather, the few species that could not be identified were classified as "indeterminate," resulting in an assay specificity of 100%. This approach enables highly multiplexed target detection using a simple PCR format that can transform infectious disease diagnostics and improve patient outcomes.
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Rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rifampin resistance by use of on-demand, near-patient technology.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2009
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Current nucleic acid amplification methods to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis are complex, labor-intensive, and technically challenging. We developed and performed the first analysis of the Cepheid Gene Xpert Systems MTB/RIF assay, an integrated hands-free sputum-processing and real-time PCR system with rapid on-demand, near-patient technology, to simultaneously detect M. tuberculosis and rifampin resistance. Analytic tests of M. tuberculosis DNA demonstrated a limit of detection (LOD) of 4.5 genomes per reaction. Studies using sputum spiked with known numbers of M. tuberculosis CFU predicted a clinical LOD of 131 CFU/ml. Killing studies showed that the assays buffer decreased M. tuberculosis viability by at least 8 logs, substantially reducing biohazards. Tests of 23 different commonly occurring rifampin resistance mutations demonstrated that all 23 (100%) would be identified as rifampin resistant. An analysis of 20 nontuberculosis mycobacteria species confirmed high assay specificity. A small clinical validation study of 107 clinical sputum samples from suspected tuberculosis cases in Vietnam detected 29/29 (100%) smear-positive culture-positive cases and 33/39 (84.6%) or 38/53 (71.7%) smear-negative culture-positive cases, as determined by growth on solid medium or on both solid and liquid media, respectively. M. tuberculosis was not detected in 25/25 (100%) of the culture-negative samples. A study of 64 smear-positive culture-positive sputa from retreatment tuberculosis cases in Uganda detected 63/64 (98.4%) culture-positive cases and 9/9 (100%) cases of rifampin resistance. Rifampin resistance was excluded in 54/55 (98.2%) susceptible cases. Specificity rose to 100% after correcting for a conventional susceptibility test error. In conclusion, this highly sensitive and simple-to-use system can detect M. tuberculosis directly from sputum in less than 2 h.
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Allelic exchange and mutant selection demonstrate that common clinical embCAB gene mutations only modestly increase resistance to ethambutol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 10-12-2009
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Mutations within codon 306 of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis embB gene modestly increase ethambutol (EMB) MICs. To identify other causes of EMB resistance and to identify causes of high-level resistance, we generated EMB-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates in vitro and performed allelic exchange studies of embB codon 406 (embB406) and embB497 mutations. In vitro selection produced mutations already identified clinically in embB306, embB397, embB497, embB1024, and embC13, which result in EMB MICs of 8 or 14 microg/ml, 5 microg/ml, 12 microg/ml, 3 microg/ml, and 4 microg/ml, respectively, and mutations at embB320, embB324, and embB445, which have not been identified in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates and which result in EMB MICs of 8 microg/ml, 8 microg/ml, and 2 to 8 microg/ml, respectively. To definitively identify the effect of the common clinical embB497 and embB406 mutations on EMB susceptibility, we created a series of isogenic mutants, exchanging the wild-type embB497 CAG codon in EMB-susceptible M. tuberculosis strain 210 for the embB497 CGG codon and the wild-type embB406 GGC codon for either the embB406 GCC, embB406 TGC, embB406 TCC, or embB406 GAC codon. These new mutants showed 6-fold and 3- to 3.5-fold increases in the EMB MICs, respectively. In contrast to the embB306 mutants, the isogenic embB497 and embB406 mutants did not have preferential growth in the presence of isoniazid or rifampin (rifampicin) at their MICs. These results demonstrate that individual embCAB mutations confer low to moderate increases in EMB MICs. Discrepancies between the EMB MICs of laboratory mutants and clinical M. tuberculosis strains with identical mutations suggest that clinical EMB resistance is multigenic and that high-level EMB resistance requires mutations in currently unknown loci.
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Use of sloppy molecular beacon probes for identification of mycobacterial species.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2009
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We report here the use of novel "sloppy" molecular beacon probes in homogeneous PCR screening assays in which thermal denaturation of the resulting probe-amplicon hybrids provides a characteristic set of amplicon melting temperature (T(m)) values that identify which species is present in a sample. Sloppy molecular beacons possess relatively long probe sequences, enabling them to form hybrids with amplicons from many different species despite the presence of mismatched base pairs. By using four sloppy molecular beacons, each possessing a different probe sequence and each labeled with a differently colored fluorophore, four different T(m) values can be determined simultaneously. We tested this technique with 27 different species of mycobacteria and found that each species generates a unique, highly reproducible signature that is unaffected by the initial bacterial DNA concentration. Utilizing this general paradigm, screening assays can be designed for the identification of a wide range of species.
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Mycobacterium tuberculosis ecology in Venezuela: epidemiologic correlates of common spoligotypes and a large clonal cluster defined by MIRU-VNTR-24.
BMC Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2009
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Tuberculosis remains an endemic public health problem, but the ecology of the TB strains prevalent, and their transmission, can vary by country and by region. We sought to investigate the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in different regions of Venezuela. A previous study identified the most prevalent strains in Venezuela but did not show geographical distribution nor identify clonal genotypes. To better understand local strain ecology, we used spoligotyping to analyze 1298 M. tuberculosis strains isolated in Venezuela from 1997 to 2006, predominantly from two large urban centers and two geographically distinct indigenous areas, and then studied a subgroup with MIRU-VNTR 24 loci.
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The structure of the oligomerization domain of Lsr2 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals a mechanism for chromosome organization and protection.
PLoS ONE
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Lsr2 is a small DNA-binding protein present in mycobacteria and related actinobacteria that regulates gene expression and influences the organization of bacterial chromatin. Lsr2 is a dimer that binds to AT-rich regions of chromosomal DNA and physically protects DNA from damage by reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). A recent structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of Lsr2 provides a rationale for its interaction with the minor groove of DNA, its preference for AT-rich tracts, and its similarity to other bacterial nucleoid-associated DNA-binding domains. In contrast, the details of Lsr2 dimerization (and oligomerization) via its N-terminal domain, and the mechanism of Lsr2-mediated chromosomal cross-linking and protection is unknown. We have solved the structure of the N-terminal domain of Lsr2 (N-Lsr2) at 1.73 Å resolution using crystallographic ab initio approaches. The structure shows an intimate dimer of two ß-ß-a motifs with no close homologues in the structural databases. The organization of individual N-Lsr2 dimers in the crystal also reveals a mechanism for oligomerization. Proteolytic removal of three N-terminal residues from Lsr2 results in the formation of an anti-parallel ?-sheet between neighboring molecules and the formation of linear chains of N-Lsr2. Oligomerization can be artificially induced using low concentrations of trypsin and the arrangement of N-Lsr2 into long chains is observed in both monoclinic and hexagonal crystallographic space groups. In solution, oligomerization of N-Lsr2 is also observed following treatment with trypsin. A change in chromosomal topology after the addition of trypsin to full-length Lsr2-DNA complexes and protection of DNA towards DNAse digestion can be observed using electron microscopy and electrophoresis. These results suggest a mechanism for oligomerization of Lsr2 via protease-activation leading to chromosome compaction and protection, and concomitant down-regulation of large numbers of genes. This mechanism is likely to be relevant under conditions of stress where cellular proteases are known to be upregulated.
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Rapid, high-throughput detection of rifampin resistance and heteroresistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by use of sloppy molecular beacon melting temperature coding.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
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Rifampin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is largely determined by mutations in an 80-bp rifampin resistance determining region (RRDR) of the rpoB gene. We developed a rapid single-well PCR assay to identify RRDR mutations. The assay uses sloppy molecular beacons to probe an asymmetric PCR of the M. tuberculosis RRDR by melting temperature (T(m)) analysis. A three-point T(m) code is generated which distinguishes wild-type from mutant RRDR DNA sequences in approximately 2 h. The assay was validated on synthetic oligonucleotide targets containing the 44 most common RRDR mutations. It was then tested on a panel of DNA extracted from 589 geographically diverse clinical M. tuberculosis cultures, including isolates with wild-type RRDR sequences and 25 different RRDR mutations. The assay detected 236/236 RRDR mutant sequences as mutant (sensitivity, 100%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 98 to 100%) and 353/353 RRDR wild-type sequences as wild type (specificity, 100%; 95% CI, 98.7 to 100%). The assay identified 222/225 rifampin-resistant isolates as rifampin resistant (sensitivity, 98.7%; 95% CI, 95.8 to 99.6%) and 335/336 rifampin-susceptible isolates as rifampin susceptible (specificity, 99.7%; 95% CI, 95.8 to 99.6%). All mutations were either individually identified or clustered into small mutation groups using the triple T(m) code. The assay accurately identified mixed (heteroresistant) samples and was shown analytically to detect RRDR mutations when present in at least 40% of the total M. tuberculosis DNA. This was at least as accurate as Sanger DNA sequencing. The assay was easy to use and well suited for high-throughput applications. This new sloppy molecular beacon assay should greatly simplify rifampin resistance testing in clinical laboratories.
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Clinical research and development of tuberculosis diagnostics: moving from silos to synergy.
J. Infect. Dis.
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The development, evaluation, and implementation of new and improved diagnostics have been identified as critical needs by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis researchers and clinicians alike. These needs exist in international and domestic settings and in adult and pediatric populations. Experts in tuberculosis and HIV care, researchers, healthcare providers, public health experts, and industry representatives, as well as representatives of pertinent US federal agencies (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health, United States Agency for International Development) assembled at a workshop proposed by the Diagnostics Working Group of the Federal Tuberculosis Taskforce to review the state of tuberculosis diagnostics development in adult and pediatric populations.
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Highly sensitive detection of Staphylococcus aureus directly from patient blood.
PLoS ONE
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Rapid detection of bloodstream infections (BSIs) can be lifesaving. We investigated the sample processing and assay parameters necessary for highly-sensitive detection of bloodstream bacteria, using Staphylococcus aureus as a model pathogen and an automated fluidic sample processing-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) platform as a model diagnostic system.
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SQ109 targets MmpL3, a membrane transporter of trehalose monomycolate involved in mycolic acid donation to the cell wall core of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
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SQ109, a 1,2-diamine related to ethambutol, is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of tuberculosis, but its mode of action remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that SQ109 disrupts cell wall assembly, as evidenced by macromolecular incorporation assays and ultrastructural analyses. SQ109 interferes with the assembly of mycolic acids into the cell wall core of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as bacilli exposed to SQ109 show immediate inhibition of trehalose dimycolate (TDM) production and fail to attach mycolates to the cell wall arabinogalactan. These effects were not due to inhibition of mycolate synthesis, since total mycolate levels were unaffected, but instead resulted in the accumulation of trehalose monomycolate (TMM), the precursor of TDM and cell wall mycolates. In vitro assays using purified enzymes showed that this was not due to inhibition of the secreted Ag85 mycolyltransferases. We were unable to achieve spontaneous generation of SQ109-resistant mutants; however, analogs of this compound that resulted in similar shutdown of TDM synthesis with concomitant TMM accumulation were used to spontaneously generate resistant mutants that were also cross-resistant to SQ109. Whole-genome sequencing of these mutants showed that these all had mutations in the essential mmpL3 gene, which encodes a transmembrane transporter. Our results suggest that MmpL3 is the target of SQ109 and that MmpL3 is a transporter of mycobacterial TMM.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.