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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Prion protein facilitates synaptic vesicle release by enhancing release probability.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2014
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The cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases as a result of protein misfolding. In humans, prion disease occurs typically with a sporadic origin where uncharacterized mechanisms induce spontaneous PrP(C) misfolding leading to neurotoxic PrP-scrapie formation (PrP(SC)). The consequences of misfolded PrP(C) signalling are well characterized but little is known about the physiological roles of PrP(C) and its involvement in disease. Here we investigated wild-type PrP(C) signalling in synaptic function as well as the effects of a disease-relevant mutation within PrP(C) (proline-to-leucine mutation at codon 101). Expression of wild-type PrP(C) at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction leads to enhanced synaptic responses as detected in larger miniature synaptic currents which are caused by enlarged presynaptic vesicles. The expression of the mutated PrP(C) leads to reduction of both parameters compared with wild-type PrP(C). Wild-type PrP(C) enhances synaptic release probability and quantal content but reduces the size of the ready-releasable vesicle pool. Partially, these changes are not detectable following expression of the mutant PrP(C). A behavioural test revealed that expression of either protein caused an increase in locomotor activities consistent with enhanced synaptic release and stronger muscle contractions. Both proteins were sensitive to proteinase digestion. These data uncover new functions of wild-type PrP(C) at the synapse with a disease-relevant mutation in PrP(C) leading to diminished functional phenotypes. Thus, our data present essential new information possibly related to prion pathogenesis in which a functional synaptic role of PrP(C) is compromised due to its advanced conversion into PrP(SC) thereby creating a lack-of-function scenario.
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TAp73 is required for spermatogenesis and the maintenance of male fertility.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
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The generation of viable sperm proceeds through a series of coordinated steps, including germ cell self-renewal, meiotic recombination, and terminal differentiation into functional spermatozoa. The p53 family of transcription factors, including p53, p63, and p73, are critical for many physiological processes, including female fertility, but little is known about their functions in spermatogenesis. Here, we report that deficiency of the TAp73 isoform, but not p53 or ?Np73, results in male infertility because of severe impairment of spermatogenesis. Mice lacking TAp73 exhibited increased DNA damage and cell death in spermatogonia, disorganized apical ectoplasmic specialization, malformed spermatids, and marked hyperspermia. We demonstrated that TAp73 regulates the mRNA levels of crucial genes involved in germ stem/progenitor cells (CDKN2B), spermatid maturation/spermiogenesis (metalloproteinase and serine proteinase inhibitors), and steroidogenesis (CYP21A2 and progesterone receptor). These alterations of testicular histology and gene expression patterns were specific to TAp73 null mice and not features of mice lacking p53. Our work provides previously unidentified in vivo evidence that TAp73 has a unique role in spermatogenesis that ensures the maintenance of mitotic cells and normal spermiogenesis. These results may have implications for the diagnosis and management of human male infertility.
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Enhancing nucleotide metabolism protects against mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in a PINK1 model of Parkinson's disease.
Nat. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2014
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Mutations in PINK1 cause early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Studies in Drosophila melanogaster have highlighted mitochondrial dysfunction on loss of Pink1 as a central mechanism of PD pathogenesis. Here we show that global analysis of transcriptional changes in Drosophila pink1 mutants reveals an upregulation of genes involved in nucleotide metabolism, critical for neuronal mitochondrial DNA synthesis. These key transcriptional changes were also detected in brains of PD patients harbouring PINK1 mutations. We demonstrate that genetic enhancement of the nucleotide salvage pathway in neurons of pink1 mutant flies rescues mitochondrial impairment. In addition, pharmacological approaches enhancing nucleotide pools reduce mitochondrial dysfunction caused by Pink1 deficiency. We conclude that loss of Pink1 evokes the activation of a previously unidentified metabolic reprogramming pathway to increase nucleotide pools and promote mitochondrial biogenesis. We propose that targeting strategies enhancing nucleotide synthesis pathways may reverse mitochondrial dysfunction and rescue neurodegeneration in PD and, potentially, other diseases linked to mitochondrial impairment.
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TAp73 knockout mice show morphological and functional nervous system defects associated with loss of p75 neurotrophin receptor.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2013
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Total and N-terminal isoform selective p73 knockout mice show a variety of central nervous system defects. Here we show that TAp73 is a transcriptional activator of p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) and that p75(NTR) mRNA and protein levels are strongly reduced in the central and peripheral nervous systems of p73 knockout mice. In parallel, primary cortical neurons from p73 knockout mice showed a reduction in neurite outgrowth and in nerve growth factor-mediated neuronal differentiation, together with reduced miniature excitatory postsynaptic current frequencies and behavioral defects. p73 null mice also have impairments in the peripheral nervous system with reduced thermal sensitivity, axon number, and myelin thickness. At least some of these morphological and functional impairments in p73 null cells can be rescued by p75(NTR) re-expression. Together, these data demonstrate that loss of p75(NTR) contributes to the neurological phenotype of p73 knockout mice.
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Sabutoclax (BI97C1) and BI112D1, putative inhibitors of MCL-1, induce mitochondrial fragmentation either upstream of or independent of apoptosis.
Neoplasia
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2013
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Owing to the high levels of antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family members observed in several cancers, there has been a major effort to develop inhibitors of the BCL2-family as chemotherapeutic agents. Of the different members in the BCL-2 family, myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (MCL-1) is commonly amplified in human tumors and is associated with their relapse and chemoresistance. As a result, specific inhibitors of MCL-1 are being designed to treat resistant tumors. However, there is increasing evidence for other nonapoptotic roles of the BCL-2 family, ranging from ionic homeostasis and autophagy to the regulation of fission-fusion dynamics in subcellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. In this study, we characterize the specificity of two novel putative MCL-1 inhibitors, BI97C1 (Sabutoclax) and BI112D1, in inducing apoptosis in a BAX/BAK-dependent manner and in an MCL-1-dependent system. In addition to their being proapoptotic, these inhibitors also cause enhanced mitochondrial fragmentation that accompanies a time-dependent loss of optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), suggesting an impairment of mitochondrial fusion. This mitochondrial fragmentation occurs independently of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1)-mediated fission activity and, unlike most apoptotic stimuli, occurs upstream of and/or independent of BAX, BAK, and other BH3-only proteins. Furthermore, this mitochondrial fragmentation occurred rapidly and preceded other hallmarks of apoptosis, including the loss in mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c. Although such mitochondrial fragmentation did not deplete total cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or alter other mitochondrial complexes, there was significant accumulation of reactive oxygen species.
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Endoplasmic reticulum membrane reorganization is regulated by ionic homeostasis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2013
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Recently we described a new, evolutionarily conserved cellular stress response characterized by a reversible reorganization of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes that is distinct from canonical ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Apogossypol, a putative broad spectrum BCL-2 family antagonist, was the prototype compound used to induce this ER membrane reorganization. Following microarray analysis of cells treated with apogossypol, we used connectivity mapping to identify a wide range of structurally diverse chemicals from different pharmacological classes and established their ability to induce ER membrane reorganization. Such structural diversity suggests that the mechanisms initiating ER membrane reorganization are also diverse and a major objective of the present study was to identify potentially common features of these mechanisms. In order to explore this, we used hierarchical clustering of transcription profiles for a number of chemicals that induce membrane reorganization and discovered two distinct clusters. One cluster contained chemicals with known effects on Ca(2+) homeostasis. Support for this was provided by the findings that ER membrane reorganization was induced by agents that either deplete ER Ca(2+) (thapsigargin) or cause an alteration in cellular Ca(2+) handling (calmodulin antagonists). Furthermore, overexpression of the ER luminal Ca(2+) sensor, STIM1, also evoked ER membrane reorganization. Although perturbation of Ca(2+) homeostasis was clearly one mechanism by which some agents induced ER membrane reorganization, influx of extracellular Na(+) but not Ca(2+) was required for ER membrane reorganization induced by apogossypol and the related BCL-2 family antagonist, TW37, in both human and yeast cells. Not only is this novel, non-canonical ER stress response evolutionary conserved but so also are aspects of the mechanism of formation of ER membrane aggregates. Thus perturbation of ionic homeostasis is important in the regulation of ER membrane reorganization.
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Investigation of the cytotoxicity of nanozeolites A and Y.
Nanotoxicology
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2011
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Nanosized zeolite particles are important materials for many applications in the field of nanotechnology. The possible adverse effects of these nanomaterials on human health have been scarcely investigated and remain largely unknown. This study reports the synthesis of nanozeolites Y and A with particle sizes of 25-100 nm and adequate colloidal stability for in vitro cytotoxicity experiments. The cytotoxic response of macrophages, epithelial and endothelial cells to these nanocrystals was assessed by determining mitochondrial activity (MTT assay) and cell membrane integrity (LDH leakage assay). After 24 h of exposure, no significant cytotoxic activity was detected for nanozeolite doses up to 500 ?g/ml. The addition of fetal calf serum to the cell culture medium during exposure did not significantly change this low response. The nanozeolites showed low toxicity compared with monodisperse amorphous silica nanoparticles of similar size (60 nm). These results may contribute to the application of safe nanozeolites for purposes such as medical imaging, sensing materials, low-k films and molecular separation processes.
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BCL2/BCL-X(L) inhibition induces apoptosis, disrupts cellular calcium homeostasis, and prevents platelet activation.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2011
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Apoptosis in megakaryocytes results in the formation of platelets. The role of apoptotic pathways in platelet turnover and in the apoptotic-like changes seen after platelet activation is poorly understood. ABT-263 (Navitoclax), a specific inhibitor of antiapoptotic BCL2 proteins, which is currently being evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of leukemia and other malignancies, induces a dose-limiting thrombocytopenia. In this study, the relationship between BCL2/BCL-X(L) inhibition, apoptosis, and platelet activation was investigated. Exposure to ABT-263 induced apoptosis but repressed platelet activation by physiologic agonists. Notably, ABT-263 induced an immediate calcium response in platelets and the depletion of intracellular calcium stores, indicating that on BCL2/BCL-X(L) inhibition platelet activation is abrogated because of a diminished calcium signaling. By comparing the effects of ABT-263 and its analog ABT-737 on platelets and leukemia cells from the same donor, we show, for the first time, that these BCL2/BCL-X(L) inhibitors do not offer any selective toxicity but induce apoptosis at similar concentrations in leukemia cells and platelets. However, reticulated platelets are less sensitive to apoptosis, supporting the hypothesis that treatment with ABT-263 induces a selective loss of older platelets and providing an explanation for the transient thrombocytopenia observed on ABT-263 treatment.
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Acute hyperbilirubinaemia induces presynaptic neurodegeneration at a central glutamatergic synapse.
J. Physiol. (Lond.)
PUBLISHED: 10-11-2010
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There is a well-established link between hyperbilirubinaemia and hearing loss in paediatrics, but the cellular mechanisms have not been elucidated. Here we used the Gunn rat model of hyperbilirubinaemia to investigate bilirubin-induced hearing loss. In vivo auditory brainstem responses revealed that Gunn rats have severe auditory deficits within 18 h of exposure to high bilirubin levels. Using an in vitro preparation of the auditory brainstem from these rats, extracellular multi-electrode array recording from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) showed longer latency and decreased amplitude of evoked field potentials following bilirubin exposure, suggestive of transmission failure at this synaptic relay. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings confirmed that the electrophysiological properties of the postsynaptic MNTB neurons were unaffected by bilirubin, with no change in action potential waveforms or current-voltage relationships. However, stimulation of the trapezoid body was unable to elicit large calyceal EPSCs in MNTB neurons of hyperbilirubinaemic rats, indicative of damage at a presynaptic site. Multi-photon imaging of anterograde-labelled calyceal projections revealed axonal staining and presynaptic profiles around MNTB principal neuron somata. Following induction of hyperbilirubinaemia the giant synapses were largely destroyed. Electron microscopy confirmed loss of presynaptic calyceal terminals and supported the electrophysiological evidence for healthy postsynaptic neurons. MNTB neurons express high levels of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Nitric oxide has been implicated in mechanisms of bilirubin toxicity elsewhere in the brain, and antagonism of nNOS by 7-nitroindazole protected hearing during bilirubin exposure. We conclude that bilirubin-induced deafness is caused by degeneration of excitatory synaptic terminals in the auditory brainstem.
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Role of NOXA and its ubiquitination in proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2010
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Bortezomib has been successfully used in the treatment of multiple myeloma and has been proposed as a potential treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In this study we investigated the mechanism by which bortezomib induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.
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Loss of thymidine kinase 2 alters neuronal bioenergetics and leads to neurodegeneration.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2010
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Mutations of thymidine kinase 2 (TK2), an essential component of the mitochondrial nucleotide salvage pathway, can give rise to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes (MDS). These clinically heterogeneous disorders are characterized by severe reduction in mtDNA copy number in affected tissues and are associated with progressive myopathy, hepatopathy and/or encephalopathy, depending in part on the underlying nuclear genetic defect. Mutations of TK2 have previously been associated with an isolated myopathic form of MDS (OMIM 609560). However, more recently, neurological phenotypes have been demonstrated in patients carrying TK2 mutations, thus suggesting that loss of TK2 results in neuronal dysfunction. Here, we directly address the role of TK2 in neuronal homeostasis using a knockout mouse model. We demonstrate that in vivo loss of TK2 activity leads to a severe ataxic phenotype, accompanied by reduced mtDNA copy number and decreased steady-state levels of electron transport chain proteins in the brain. In TK2-deficient cerebellar neurons, these abnormalities are associated with impaired mitochondrial bioenergetic function, aberrant mitochondrial ultrastructure and degeneration of selected neuronal types. Overall, our findings demonstrate that TK2 deficiency leads to neuronal dysfunction in vivo, and have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of neurological impairment in MDS.
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HVCN1 modulates BCR signal strength via regulation of BCR-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species.
Nat. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2010
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Voltage-gated proton currents regulate generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phagocytic cells. In B cells, stimulation of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) results in the production of ROS that participate in B cell activation, but the involvement of proton channels is unknown. We report here that the voltage-gated proton channel HVCN1 associated with the BCR complex and was internalized together with the BCR after activation. BCR-induced generation of ROS was lower in HVCN1-deficient B cells, which resulted in attenuated BCR signaling via impaired BCR-dependent oxidation of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. This resulted in less activation of the kinases Syk and Akt, impaired mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis and diminished antibody responses in vivo. Our findings identify unanticipated functions for proton channels in B cells and demonstrate the importance of ROS in BCR signaling and downstream metabolism.
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Desmethylclomipramine induces the accumulation of autophagy markers by blocking autophagic flux.
J. Cell. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2009
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Alterations in the autophagic pathway are associated with the onset and progression of various diseases. However, despite the therapeutic potential for pharmacological modulators of autophagic flux, few such compounds have been characterised. Here we show that clomipramine, an FDA-approved drug long used for the treatment of psychiatric disorders, and its active metabolite desmethylclomipramine (DCMI) interfere with autophagic flux. Treating cells with DCMI caused a significant and specific increase in autophagosomal markers and a concomitant blockage of the degradation of autophagic cargo. This observation might be relevant in therapy in which malignant cells exploit autophagy to survive stress conditions, rendering them more susceptible to the action of cytotoxic agents. In accordance, DCMI-mediated obstruction of autophagic flux increased the cytotoxic effect of chemotherapeutic agents. Collectively, our studies describe a new function of DCMI that can be exploited for the treatment of pathological conditions in which manipulation of autophagic flux is thought to be beneficial.
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Targeting autophagy potentiates tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced cell death in Philadelphia chromosome-positive cells, including primary CML stem cells.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2009
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Imatinib mesylate (IM), a potent inhibitor of the BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase, has become standard first-line therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but the frequency of resistance increases in advancing stages of disease. Elimination of BCR/ABL-dependent intracellular signals triggers apoptosis, but it is unclear whether this activates additional cell survival and/or death pathways. We have shown here that IM induces autophagy in CML blast crisis cell lines, CML primary cells, and p210BCR/ABL-expressing myeloid precursor cells. IM-induced autophagy did not involve c-Abl or Bcl-2 activity but was associated with ER stress and was suppressed by depletion of intracellular Ca2+, suggesting it is mechanistically nonoverlapping with IM-induced apoptosis. We further demonstrated that suppression of autophagy using either pharmacological inhibitors or RNA interference of essential autophagy genes enhanced cell death induced by IM in cell lines and primary CML cells. Critically, the combination of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), i.e., IM, nilotinib, or dasatinib, with inhibitors of autophagy resulted in near complete elimination of phenotypically and functionally defined CML stem cells. Together, these findings suggest that autophagy inhibitors may enhance the therapeutic effects of TKIs in the treatment of CML.
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miR-24 triggers epidermal differentiation by controlling actin adhesion and cell migration.
J. Cell Biol.
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During keratinocyte differentiation and stratification, cells undergo extensive remodeling of their actin cytoskeleton, which is important to control cell mobility and to coordinate and stabilize adhesive structures necessary for functional epithelia. Limited knowledge exists on how the actin cytoskeleton is remodeled in epithelial stratification and whether cell shape is a key determinant to trigger terminal differentiation. In this paper, using human keratinocytes and mouse epidermis as models, we implicate miR-24 in actin adhesion dynamics and demonstrate that miR-24 directly controls actin cable formation and cell mobility. miR-24 overexpression in proliferating cells was sufficient to trigger keratinocyte differentiation both in vitro and in vivo and directly repressed cytoskeletal modulators (PAK4, Tks5, and ArhGAP19). Silencing of these targets recapitulated the effects of miR-24 overexpression. Our results uncover a new regulatory pathway involving a differentiation-promoting microribonucleic acid that regulates actin adhesion dynamics in human and mouse epidermis.
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TAp73 depletion accelerates aging through metabolic dysregulation.
Genes Dev.
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Aging is associated with impaired scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we show that TAp73, a p53 family member, protects against aging by regulating mitochondrial activity and preventing ROS accumulation. TAp73-null mice show more pronounced aging with increased oxidative damage and senescence. TAp73 deletion reduces cellular ATP levels, oxygen consumption, and mitochondrial complex IV activity, with increased ROS production and oxidative stress sensitivity. We show that the mitochondrial complex IV subunit cytochrome C oxidase subunit 4 (Cox4i1) is a direct TAp73 target and that Cox4i1 knockdown phenocopies the cellular senescence of TAp73-null cells. Results indicate that TAp73 affects mitochondrial respiration and ROS homeostasis, thus regulating aging.
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Sustained translational repression by eIF2?-P mediates prion neurodegeneration.
Nature
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The mechanisms leading to neuronal death in neurodegenerative disease are poorly understood. Many of these disorders, including Alzheimers, Parkinsons and prion diseases, are associated with the accumulation of misfolded disease-specific proteins. The unfolded protein response is a protective cellular mechanism triggered by rising levels of misfolded proteins. One arm of this pathway results in the transient shutdown of protein translation, through phosphorylation of the ?-subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor, eIF2. Activation of the unfolded protein response and/or increased eIF2?-P levels are seen in patients with Alzheimers, Parkinsons and prion diseases, but how this links to neurodegeneration is unknown. Here we show that accumulation of prion protein during prion replication causes persistent translational repression of global protein synthesis by eIF2?-P, associated with synaptic failure and neuronal loss in prion-diseased mice. Further, we show that promoting translational recovery in hippocampi of prion-infected mice is neuroprotective. Overexpression of GADD34, a specific eIF2?-P phosphatase, as well as reduction of levels of prion protein by lentivirally mediated RNA interference, reduced eIF2?-P levels. As a result, both approaches restored vital translation rates during prion disease, rescuing synaptic deficits and neuronal loss, thereby significantly increasing survival. In contrast, salubrinal, an inhibitor of eIF2?-P dephosphorylation, increased eIF2?-P levels, exacerbating neurotoxicity and significantly reducing survival in prion-diseased mice. Given the prevalence of protein misfolding and activation of the unfolded protein response in several neurodegenerative diseases, our results suggest that manipulation of common pathways such as translational control, rather than disease-specific approaches, may lead to new therapies preventing synaptic failure and neuronal loss across the spectrum of these disorders.
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Oxidative stress induced by pure and iron-doped amorphous silica nanoparticles in subtoxic conditions.
Chem. Res. Toxicol.
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Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiO?-NPs) have found broad applications in industry and are currently intensively studied for potential uses in medical and biomedical fields. Several studies have reported cytotoxic and inflammatory responses induced by SiO?-NPs in different cell types. The present study was designed to examine the association of oxidative stress markers with SiO?-NP induced cytotoxicity in human endothelial cells. We used pure monodisperse amorphous silica nanoparticles of two sizes (16 and 60 nm; S16 and S60) and a positive control, iron-doped nanosilica (16 nm; SFe), to study the generation of hydroxyl radicals (HO·) in cellular-free conditions and oxidative stress in cellular systems. We investigated whether SiO?-NPs could influence intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels, increase lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxyalkenal (HAE) concentrations), and up-regulate heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA expression in the studied cells. None of the particles, except SFe, produced ROS in cell-free systems. We found significant modifications for all parameters in cells treated with SFe nanoparticles. At cytotoxic doses of S16 (40-50 ?g/mL), we detected weak alterations of intracellular glutathione (4 h) and a marked induction of HO-1 mRNA (6 h). Cytotoxic doses of S60 elicited similar responses. Preincubation of cells being exposed to SiO?-NPs with an antioxidant (5 mM N-acetylcysteine, NAC) significantly reduced the cytotoxic activity of S16 and SFe (when exposed up to 25 and 50 ?g/mL, respectively) but did not protect cells treated with S60. Preincubation with NAC significantly reduced HO-1 mRNA expression in cells treated with SFe but did not have any effect on HO-1 mRNA level in cell exposed to S16 and S60. Our study demonstrates that the chemical composition of the silica nanoparticles is a dominant factor in inducing oxidative stress.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.