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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Yersinia pestis and the plague of Justinian 541-543 AD: a genomic analysis.
Lancet Infect Dis
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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Yersinia pestis has caused at least three human plague pandemics. The second (Black Death, 14-17th centuries) and third (19-20th centuries) have been genetically characterised, but there is only a limited understanding of the first pandemic, the Plague of Justinian (6-8th centuries). To address this gap, we sequenced and analysed draft genomes of Y pestis obtained from two individuals who died in the first pandemic.
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Second-pandemic strain of Vibrio cholerae from the Philadelphia cholera outbreak of 1849.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2014
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In the 19th century, there were several major cholera pandemics in the Indian subcontinent, Europe, and North America. The causes of these outbreaks and the genomic strain identities remain a mystery. We used targeted high-throughput sequencing to reconstruct the Vibrio cholerae genome from the preserved intestine of a victim of the 1849 cholera outbreak in Philadelphia, part of the second cholera pandemic. This O1 biotype strain has 95 to 97% similarity with the classical O395 genome, differing by 203 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), lacking three genomic islands, and probably having one or more tandem cholera toxin prophage (CTX) arrays, which potentially affected its virulence. This result highlights archived medical remains as a potential resource for investigations into the genomic origins of past pandemics.
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Population-level effects of suppressing fever.
Proc. Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Fever is commonly attenuated with antipyretic medication as a means to treat unpleasant symptoms of infectious diseases. We highlight a potentially important negative effect of fever suppression that becomes evident at the population level: reducing fever may increase transmission of associated infections. A higher transmission rate implies that a larger proportion of the population will be infected, so widespread antipyretic drug use is likely to lead to more illness and death than would be expected in a population that was not exposed to antipyretic pharmacotherapies. We assembled the published data available for estimating the magnitudes of these individual effects for seasonal influenza. While the data are incomplete and heterogeneous, they suggest that, overall, fever suppression increases the expected number of influenza cases and deaths in the US: for pandemic influenza with reproduction number , the estimated increase is 1% (95% CI: 0.0-2.7%), whereas for seasonal influenza with , the estimated increase is 5% (95% CI: 0.2-12.1%).
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Estimating Initial Epidemic Growth Rates.
Bull. Math. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2013
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The initial exponential growth rate of an epidemic is an important measure of disease spread, and is commonly used to infer the basic reproduction number [Formula: see text]. While modern techniques (e.g., MCMC and particle filtering) for parameter estimation of mechanistic models have gained popularity, maximum likelihood fitting of phenomenological models remains important due to its simplicity, to the difficulty of using modern methods in the context of limited data, and to the fact that there is not always enough information available to choose an appropriate mechanistic model. However, it is often not clear which phenomenological model is appropriate for a given dataset. We compare the performance of four commonly used phenomenological models (exponential, Richards, logistic, and delayed logistic) in estimating initial epidemic growth rates by maximum likelihood, by fitting them to simulated epidemics with known parameters. For incidence data, both the logistic model and the Richards model yield accurate point estimates for fitting windows up to the epidemic peak. When observation errors are small, the Richards model yields confidence intervals with better coverage. For mortality data, the Richards model and the delayed logistic model yield the best growth rate estimates. We also investigate the width and coverage of the confidence intervals corresponding to these fits.
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Patterns of spread of influenza A in Canada.
Proc. Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Understanding spatial patterns of influenza transmission is important for designing control measures. We investigate spatial patterns of laboratory-confirmed influenza A across Canada from October 1999 to August 2012. A statistical analysis (generalized linear model) of the seasonal epidemics in this time period establishes a clear spatio-temporal pattern, with influenza emerging earlier in western provinces. Early emergence is also correlated with low temperature and low absolute humidity in the autumn. For the richer data from the 2009 pandemic, a mechanistic mathematical analysis, based on a transmission model, shows that both school terms and weather had important effects on pandemic influenza transmission.
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Age-specific mortality during the 1918 influenza pandemic: unravelling the mystery of high young adult mortality.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The worldwide spread of a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus in 2009 showed that influenza remains a significant health threat, even for individuals in the prime of life. This paper focuses on the unusually high young adult mortality observed during the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918. Using historical records from Canada and the U.S., we report a peak of mortality at the exact age of 28 during the pandemic and argue that this increased mortality resulted from an early life exposure to influenza during the previous Russian flu pandemic of 1889-90. We posit that in specific instances, development of immunological memory to an influenza virus strain in early life may lead to a dysregulated immune response to antigenically novel strains encountered in later life, thereby increasing the risk of death. Exposure during critical periods of development could also create holes in the T cell repertoire and impair fetal maturation in general, thereby increasing mortality from infectious diseases later in life. Knowledge of the age-pattern of susceptibility to mortality from influenza could improve crisis management during future influenza pandemics.
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Inferring the causes of the three waves of the 1918 influenza pandemic in England and Wales.
Proc. Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Past influenza pandemics appear to be characterized by multiple waves of incidence, but the mechanisms that account for this phenomenon remain unclear. We propose a simple epidemic model, which incorporates three factors that might contribute to the generation of multiple waves: (i) schools opening and closing, (ii) temperature changes during the outbreak, and (iii) changes in human behaviour in response to the outbreak. We fit this model to the reported influenza mortality during the 1918 pandemic in 334 UK administrative units and estimate the epidemiological parameters. We then use information criteria to evaluate how well these three factors explain the observed patterns of mortality. Our results indicate that all three factors are important but that behavioural responses had the largest effect. The parameter values that produce the best fit are biologically reasonable and yield epidemiological dynamics that match the observed data well.
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Effects of the infectious period distribution on predicted transitions in childhood disease dynamics.
J R Soc Interface
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The population dynamics of infectious diseases occasionally undergo rapid qualitative changes, such as transitions from annual to biennial cycles or to irregular dynamics. Previous work, based on the standard seasonally forced susceptible-exposed-infectious-removed (SEIR) model has found that transitions in the dynamics of many childhood diseases result from bifurcations induced by slow changes in birth and vaccination rates. However, the standard SEIR formulation assumes that the stage durations (latent and infectious periods) are exponentially distributed, whereas real distributions are narrower and centred around the mean. Much recent work has indicated that realistically distributed stage durations strongly affect the dynamical structure of seasonally forced epidemic models. We investigate whether inferences drawn from previous analyses of transitions in patterns of measles dynamics are robust to the shapes of the stage duration distributions. As an illustrative example, we analyse measles dynamics in New York City from 1928 to 1972. We find that with a fixed mean infectious period in the susceptible-infectious-removed (SIR) model, the dynamical structure and predicted transitions vary substantially as a function of the shape of the infectious period distribution. By contrast, with fixed mean latent and infectious periods in the SEIR model, the shapes of the stage duration distributions have a less dramatic effect on model dynamical structure and predicted transitions. All these results can be understood more easily by considering the distribution of the disease generation time as opposed to the distributions of individual disease stages. Numerical bifurcation analysis reveals that for a given mean generation time the dynamics of the SIR and SEIR models for measles are nearly equivalent and are insensitive to the shapes of the disease stage distributions.
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Targeted enrichment of ancient pathogens yielding the pPCP1 plasmid of Yersinia pestis from victims of the Black Death.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2011
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Although investigations of medieval plague victims have identified Yersinia pestis as the putative etiologic agent of the pandemic, methodological limitations have prevented large-scale genomic investigations to evaluate changes in the pathogens virulence over time. We screened over 100 skeletal remains from Black Death victims of the East Smithfield mass burial site (1348-1350, London, England). Recent methods of DNA enrichment coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing subsequently permitted reconstruction of ten full human mitochondrial genomes (16 kb each) and the full pPCP1 (9.6 kb) virulence-associated plasmid at high coverage. Comparisons of molecular damage profiles between endogenous human and Y. pestis DNA confirmed its authenticity as an ancient pathogen, thus representing the longest contiguous genomic sequence for an ancient pathogen to date. Comparison of our reconstructed plasmid against modern Y. pestis shows identity with several isolates matching the Medievalis biovar; however, our chromosomal sequences indicate the victims were infected with a Y. pestis variant that has not been previously reported. Our data reveal that the Black Death in medieval Europe was caused by a variant of Y. pestis that may no longer exist, and genetic data carried on its pPCP1 plasmid were not responsible for the purported epidemiological differences between ancient and modern forms of Y. pestis infections.
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A draft genome of Yersinia pestis from victims of the Black Death.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2011
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Technological advances in DNA recovery and sequencing have drastically expanded the scope of genetic analyses of ancient specimens to the extent that full genomic investigations are now feasible and are quickly becoming standard. This trend has important implications for infectious disease research because genomic data from ancient microbes may help to elucidate mechanisms of pathogen evolution and adaptation for emerging and re-emerging infections. Here we report a reconstructed ancient genome of Yersinia pestis at 30-fold average coverage from Black Death victims securely dated to episodes of pestilence-associated mortality in London, England, 1348-1350. Genetic architecture and phylogenetic analysis indicate that the ancient organism is ancestral to most extant strains and sits very close to the ancestral node of all Y. pestis commonly associated with human infection. Temporal estimates suggest that the Black Death of 1347-1351 was the main historical event responsible for the introduction and widespread dissemination of the ancestor to all currently circulating Y. pestis strains pathogenic to humans, and further indicates that contemporary Y. pestis epidemics have their origins in the medieval era. Comparisons against modern genomes reveal no unique derived positions in the medieval organism, indicating that the perceived increased virulence of the disease during the Black Death may not have been due to bacterial phenotype. These findings support the notion that factors other than microbial genetics, such as environment, vector dynamics and host susceptibility, should be at the forefront of epidemiological discussions regarding emerging Y. pestis infections.
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Multi-stability and multi-instability phenomena in a mathematical model of tumor-immune-virus interactions.
Bull. Math. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2011
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Recent advances in virology, gene therapy, and molecular and cell biology have provided insight into the mechanisms through which viruses can boost the anti-tumor immune response, or can infect and directly kill tumor cells. A recent experimental report (Bridle et al. in Molec. Ther. 18(8):1430-1439, 2010) showed that a sequential treatment approach that involves two viruses that carry the same tumor antigen leads to an improved anti-tumor response compared to the effect of each virus alone. In this article, we derive a mathematical model to investigate the anti-tumor effect of two viruses, and their interactions with the immune cells. We discuss the conditions necessary for permanent tumor elimination and, in this context, we stress the importance of investigating the long-term effect of non-linear interactions. In particular, we discuss multi-stability and multi-instability, two complex phenomena that can cause abrupt transitions between different states in biological and physical systems. In the context of cancer immunotherapies, the transitions between a tumor-free and a tumor-present state have so far been associated with the multi-stability phenomenon. Here, we show that multi-instability can also cause the system to switch from one state to the other. In addition, we show that the multi-stability is driven by the immune response, while the multi-instability is driven by the presence of the virus.
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Cholera epidemic in Haiti, 2010: using a transmission model to explain spatial spread of disease and identify optimal control interventions.
Ann. Intern. Med.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2011
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Haiti is in the midst of a cholera epidemic. Surveillance data for formulating models of the epidemic are limited, but such models can aid understanding of epidemic processes and help define control strategies.
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Age-specific mortality risk from pandemic influenza.
J. Theor. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2011
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Younger age groups account for proportionally more mortality in influenza pandemics than in seasonal influenza epidemics. Mechanisms that might explain this include young people suffering from an over-reactive immune system ("cytokine storm"), older people benefiting from cross-immunity from a wider variety of previous influenza infections ("antigenic history"), and lifetime immune responses in all people being shaped by their first influenza A infection ("antigenic imprinting" or "original antigenic sin"). We examined whether these mechanisms can explain age-specific influenza mortality patterns, using the complete database of individual deaths in Canada from 1951 to 1999. The mortality pattern during the 1957 pandemic indicates that antigenic imprinting plays an important role in determining age-specific influenza virulence and that both shift years and major drift years contribute significantly to antigenic imprints. This information should help pandemic planners to identify age groups that might respond differently to novel influenza strains.
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Herald waves of cholera in nineteenth century London.
J R Soc Interface
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2010
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Deaths from cholera in London, UK, were recorded weekly from 1824 to 1901. Three features of the time series stand out: (i) cholera deaths were strongly seasonal, with peak mortality almost always in the summer, (ii) the only non-summer outbreaks occurred in the spring of 1832, the autumn of 1848 and the winter of 1853, and (iii) extraordinarily severe summer outbreaks occurred in 1832, 1849, 1854 and 1866 (the four great cholera years). The non-summer outbreaks of 1832, 1848 and 1853 appear to have been herald waves of newly invading cholera strains. In addition, a simple mathematical model confirms that a non-summer introduction of a new cholera strain can result in an initial herald wave, followed by a severe outbreak the following summer. Through the analysis of the genomes of nineteenth-century specimens, it may be possible to identify the strains that caused these herald waves and the well-known cholera epidemics that followed.
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Parameterizing state-space models for infectious disease dynamics by generalized profiling: measles in Ontario.
J R Soc Interface
PUBLISHED: 11-17-2010
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Parameter estimation for infectious disease models is important for basic understanding (e.g. to identify major transmission pathways), for forecasting emerging epidemics, and for designing control measures. Differential equation models are often used, but statistical inference for differential equations suffers from numerical challenges and poor agreement between observational data and deterministic models. Accounting for these departures via stochastic model terms requires full specification of the probabilistic dynamics, and computationally demanding estimation methods. Here, we demonstrate the utility of an alternative approach, generalized profiling, which provides robustness to violations of a deterministic model without needing to specify a complete probabilistic model. We introduce novel means for estimating the robustness parameters and for statistical inference in this framework. The methods are applied to a model for pre-vaccination measles incidence in Ontario, and we demonstrate the statistical validity of our inference through extensive simulation. The results confirm that school term versus summer drives seasonality of transmission, but we find no effects of short school breaks and the estimated basic reproductive ratio (0) greatly exceeds previous estimates. The approach applies naturally to any system for which candidate differential equations are available, and avoids many challenges that have limited Monte Carlo inference for state-space models.
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Modeling anti-tumor Th1 and Th2 immunity in the rejection of melanoma.
J. Theor. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2010
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Recent experiments indicate that CD4(+) Th2 cells can reject skin tumors in mice, while CD4(+) Th1 cells cannot (Mattes et al., 2003; Zhang et al., 2009). These results are surprising because CD4(+) Th1 cells are typically considered to be capable of tumor rejection. We used mathematical models to investigate this unexpected outcome. We found that neither CD4(+) Th1 nor CD4(+) Th2 cells could eliminate the cancer cells when acting alone, but that tumor elimination could be induced by recruitment of eosinophils by the Th2 cells. These recruited eosinophils had unexpected indirect effects on the decay rate of type 2 cytokines and the rate at which Th2 cells are inactivated through interactions with cancer cells. Strikingly, the presence of eosinophils impacted tumor growth more significantly than the release of tumor-suppressing cytokines such as IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Our simulations suggest that novel strategies to enhance eosinophil recruitment into skin tumors may improve cancer immunotherapies.
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Attractivity of coherent manifolds in metapopulation models.
J Math Biol
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2010
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The likelihood that coupled dynamical systems will completely synchronize, or become "coherent", is often of great applied interest. Previous work has established conditions for local stability of coherent solutions and global attractivity of coherent manifolds in a variety of spatially explicit models. We consider models of communities coupled by dispersal and explore intermediate regimes in which it can be shown that states in phase space regions of positive measure are attracted to coherent solutions. Our methods yield rigorous and practically useful coherence criteria that facilitate useful analyses of ecological and epidemiological problems.
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Effect of influenza vaccination of children on infection rates in Hutterite communities: a randomized trial.
JAMA
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2010
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Children and adolescents appear to play an important role in the transmission of influenza. Selectively vaccinating youngsters against influenza may interrupt virus transmission and protect those not immunized.
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Interactions between the immune system and cancer: a brief review of non-spatial mathematical models.
Bull. Math. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2010
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We briefly review spatially homogeneous mechanistic mathematical models describing the interactions between a malignant tumor and the immune system. We begin with the simplest (single equation) models for tumor growth and proceed to consider greater immunological detail (and correspondingly more equations) in steps. This approach allows us to clarify the necessity for expanding the complexity of models in order to capture the biological mechanisms we wish to understand. We conclude by discussing some unsolved problems in the mathematical modeling of cancer-immune system interactions.
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Multiple transmission pathways and disease dynamics in a waterborne pathogen model.
Bull. Math. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2010
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Multiple transmission pathways exist for many waterborne diseases, including cholera, Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Campylobacter. Theoretical work exploring the effects of multiple transmission pathways on disease dynamics is incomplete. Here, we consider a simple ODE model that extends the classical SIR framework by adding a compartment (W) that tracks pathogen concentration in the water. Infected individuals shed pathogen into the water compartment, and new infections arise both through exposure to contaminated water, as well as by the classical SIR person-person transmission pathway. We compute the basic reproductive number ([Symbol: see text](0)), epidemic growth rate, and final outbreak size for the resulting "SIWR" model, and examine how these fundamental quantities depend upon the transmission parameters for the different pathways. We prove that the endemic disease equilibrium for the SIWR model is globally stable. We identify the pathogen decay rate in the water compartment as a key parameter determining when the distinction between the different transmission routes in the SIWR model is important. When the decay rate is slow, using an SIR model rather than the SIWR model can lead to under-estimates of the basic reproductive number and over-estimates of the infectious period.
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Reconstructing influenza incidence by deconvolution of daily mortality time series.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2009
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We propose a mathematically straightforward method to infer the incidence curve of an epidemic from a recorded daily death curve and time-to-death distribution; the method is based on the Richardson-Lucy deconvolution scheme from optics. We apply the method to reconstruct the incidence curves for the 1918 influenza epidemic in Philadelphia and New York State. The incidence curves are then used to estimate epidemiological quantities, such as daily reproductive numbers and infectivity ratios. We found that during a brief period before the official control measures were implemented in Philadelphia, the drop in the daily number of new infections due to an average infector was much larger than expected from the depletion of susceptibles during that period; this finding was subjected to extensive sensitivity analysis. Combining this with recorded evidence about public behavior, we conclude that public awareness and change in behavior is likely to have had a major role in the slowdown of the epidemic even in a city whose response to the 1918 influenza epidemic is considered to have been among the worst in the U.S.
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Surgical mask vs N95 respirator for preventing influenza among health care workers: a randomized trial.
JAMA
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2009
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Data about the effectiveness of the surgical mask compared with the N95 respirator for protecting health care workers against influenza are sparse. Given the likelihood that N95 respirators will be in short supply during a pandemic and not available in many countries, knowing the effectiveness of the surgical mask is of public health importance.
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Initial human transmission dynamics of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in North America.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2009
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Between 5 and 25 April 2009, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 caused a substantial, severe outbreak in Mexico, and subsequently developed into the first global pandemic in 41 years. We determined the reproduction number of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 by analyzing the dynamics of the complete case series in Mexico City during this early period.
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Population dynamics of live-attenuated virus vaccines.
Theor Popul Biol
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2009
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Viruses contained in live-attenuated virus vaccines (LAVV) can be transmitted between individuals, resulting in secondary or contact vaccinations. This fact has been exploited successfully in the use of the Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV) to better control wild-type polio viruses. In this work we analyze general LAVV vaccination models for infections that confer lifelong immunity. We consider both standard (continuous) vaccination strategies and pulse vaccination programs (where mass vaccination is carried out at regular intervals). For continuous vaccination, we provide a complete global analysis of a very general compartmental ordinary differential equation LAVV model. We find that the threshold vaccination level required for the eradication of wild-type virus depends on the basic reproduction numbers of both the wild-type and vaccine viruses, but is otherwise independent of the distributions of the durations in each of the sequence of stages of disease progression (e.g., latent, infectious, etc.). Furthermore, even for vaccine viruses with reproduction numbers below one, which would naturally fade from the population upon cessation of vaccination, there can be a significant reduction in the threshold vaccination level. The dependence of the threshold vaccination level on the virus reproduction numbers largely generalizes to the pulse vaccination model. For shorter pulsing periods there is negligible difference in threshold vaccination level as compared to continuous vaccination campaigns. Thus, we conclude that current policy in many countries to employ annual pulsed OPV vaccination does not significantly diminish the benefits of contact vaccination.
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Characteristics of respiratory viral infections during influenza season in Canadian Hutterite Communities.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses
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To determined the pathogen-specific incidence of respiratory virus infection in Hutterite communities occurring over the 2008-2009 influenza season and assess temporal characteristics of respiratory illness related to infection.
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Multifractal signatures of infectious diseases.
J R Soc Interface
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Incidence of infection time-series data for the childhood diseases measles, chicken pox, rubella and whooping cough are described in the language of multifractals. We explore the potential of using the wavelet transform maximum modulus (WTMM) method to characterize the multiscale structure of the observed time series and of simulated data generated by the stochastic susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered (SEIR) epidemic model. The singularity spectra of the observed time series suggest that each disease is characterized by a unique multifractal signature, which distinguishes that particular disease from the others. The wavelet scaling functions confirm that the time series of measles, rubella and whooping cough are clearly multifractal, while chicken pox has a more monofractal structure in time. The stochastic SEIR epidemic model is unable to reproduce the qualitative singularity structure of the reported incidence data: it is too smooth and does not appear to have a multifractal singularity structure. The precise reasons for the failure of the SEIR epidemic model to reproduce the correct multiscale structure of the reported incidence data remain unclear.
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Effects of school closure on incidence of pandemic influenza in Alberta, Canada.
Ann. Intern. Med.
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Control of pandemic influenza by social-distancing measures, such as school closures, is a controversial aspect of pandemic planning. However, investigations of the extent to which these measures actually affect the progression of a pandemic have been limited.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.