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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
AIDS-related mycoses: the way forward.
Trends Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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The contribution of fungal infections to the morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected individuals is largely unrecognized. A recent meeting highlighted several priorities that need to be urgently addressed, including improved epidemiological surveillance, increased availability of existing diagnostics and drugs, more training in the field of medical mycology, and better funding for research and provision of treatment, particularly in developing countries.
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Fungal iron availability during deep seated candidiasis is defined by a complex interplay involving systemic and local events.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2013
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Nutritional immunity--the withholding of nutrients by the host--has long been recognised as an important factor that shapes bacterial-host interactions. However, the dynamics of nutrient availability within local host niches during fungal infection are poorly defined. We have combined laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP MS), MALDI imaging and immunohistochemistry with microtranscriptomics to examine iron homeostasis in the host and pathogen in the murine model of systemic candidiasis. Dramatic changes in the renal iron landscape occur during disease progression. The infection perturbs global iron homeostasis in the host leading to iron accumulation in the renal medulla. Paradoxically, this is accompanied by nutritional immunity in the renal cortex as iron exclusion zones emerge locally around fungal lesions. These exclusion zones correlate with immune infiltrates and haem oxygenase 1-expressing host cells. This local nutritional immunity decreases iron availability, leading to a switch in iron acquisition mechanisms within mature fungal lesions, as revealed by laser capture microdissection and qRT-PCR analyses. Therefore, a complex interplay of systemic and local events influences iron homeostasis and pathogen-host dynamics during disease progression.
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Enhancing immunogenicity of a 3aminomethylnicotine-DT-conjugate anti-nicotine vaccine with CpG adjuvant in mice and non-human primates.
Int. Immunopharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2013
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Tobacco smoking is one of the most preventable causes of morbidity and mortality, but current smoking cessation treatments have relatively poor long term efficacy. Anti-nicotine vaccines offer a novel mechanism of action whereby anti-nicotine antibodies (Ab) in circulation prevent nicotine from entering the brain, thus avoiding the reward mechanisms that underpin nicotine addiction. Since antibody responses are typically long lasting, such vaccines could potentially lead to better long-term smoking cessation outcomes. Clinical trials of anti-nicotine vaccines to date have not succeeded, although there was evidence that very high anti-nicotine Ab titers could lead to improved smoking cessation outcomes, suggesting that achieving higher titers in more subjects might result in better efficacy overall. In this study, we evaluated CpG (TLR9 agonist) and aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) adjuvants with a model anti-nicotine antigen comprising trans-3aminomethylnicotine (3AmNic) conjugated to diphtheria toxoid (DT). Anti-nicotine Ab titers were significantly higher in both mice and non-human primates (NHP) when 3AmNic-DT was administered with CpG/Al(OH)3 than with Al(OH)3 alone, and affinity was enhanced in mice. CpG also improved functional responses, as measured by nicotine brain levels in mice after intravenous administration of radiolabeled nicotine (30% versus 3% without CpG), or by nicotine binding capacity of NHP antisera (15-fold higher with CpG). Further improvement should focus on maximizing Ab function, which takes into account both titer and avidity, and this may require improved conjugate design in addition to adjuvants.
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Antibiotic Stewardship Ward Rounds and a Dedicated Prescription Chart Reduce Antibiotic Consumption and Pharmacy Costs without Affecting Inpatient Mortality or Re-Admission Rates.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Antibiotic consumption is a major driver of bacterial resistance. To address the increasing burden of multi-drug resistant bacterial infections, antibiotic stewardship programmes are promoted worldwide to rationalize antibiotic prescribing and conserve remaining antibiotics. Few studies have been reported from developing countries and none from Africa that report on an intervention based approach with outcomes that include morbidity and mortality.
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Selection of a novel anti-nicotine vaccine: influence of antigen design on antibody function in mice.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Anti-nicotine vaccines may aid smoking cessation via the induction of anti-nicotine antibodies (Ab) which reduce nicotine entering the brain, and hence the associated reward. Ab function depends on both the quantity (titer) and the quality (affinity) of the Ab. Anti-nicotine vaccines tested previously in clinical studies had poor efficacy despite high Ab titer, and this may be due to inadequate function if Ab of low affinity were induced. In this study, we designed and synthesized a series of novel nicotine-like haptens which were all linked to diphtheria toxoid (DT) as carrier, but which differed in the site of attachment of linker to nicotine, the nature of linker used, and the handle used to attach the hapten to DT. The resulting hapten conjugates were evaluated in a mouse model, using CpG (a TLR9 agonist) and aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) as adjuvants, whereby Ab titers, affinity and function were evaluated using a radiolabeled nicotine challenge model. A series of additional linkers varying in length, rigidity and polarity were used with a single hapten to generate additional DT-conjugates, which were also tested in mice. Conjugates made with different haptens resulted in various titers of anti-nicotine Ab. Several haptens gave similarly high Ab titers, but among these, Ab affinity and hence function varied considerably. Linker also influenced Ab titer, affinity and function. These results demonstrate that immune responses induced in mice by nicotine-conjugate antigens are greatly influenced by hapten design including site of attachment of linker to nicotine, the nature of linker used, and the handle used to attach the hapten to DT. While both Ab titer and affinity contributed to function, affinity was more sensitive to antigen differences.
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A comprehensive evaluation of colonic mucosal isolates of Sutterella wadsworthensis from inflammatory bowel disease.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2011
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Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) arises in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of an unidentified environmental trigger, possibly a hitherto unknown bacterial pathogen. Twenty-six clinical isolates of Sutterella wadsworthensis were obtained from 134 adults and 61 pediatric patients undergoing colonoscopy, of whom 69 and 29 respectively had IBD. S. wadsworthensis was initially more frequently isolated from IBD subjects, hence this comprehensive study was undertaken to elucidate its role in IBD. Utilizing these samples, a newly designed PCR was developed, to study the prevalence of this bacterium in adult patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Sutterella wadsworthensis was detected in 83.8% of adult patients with UC as opposed to 86.1% of control subjects (p?=?0.64). Selected strains from IBD cases and controls were studied to elicit morphological, proteomic, genotypic and pathogenic differences. This study reports Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) appearances and characteristic MALDI-TOF MS protein profiles of S. wadsworthensis for the very first time. SEM showed that the bacterium is pleomorphic, existing in predominantly two morphological forms, long rods and coccobacilli. No differences were noted in the MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry proteomic analysis. There was no distinct clustering of strains identified from cases and controls on sequence analysis. Cytokine response after monocyte challenge with strains from patients with IBD and controls did not yield any significant differences. Our studies indicate that S. wadsworthensis is unlikely to play a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. Strains from cases of IBD could not be distinguished from those identified from controls.
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Molecular and proteomic analyses highlight the importance of ubiquitination for the stress resistance, metabolic adaptation, morphogenetic regulation and virulence of Candida albicans.
Mol. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2011
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Post-translational modifications of proteins play key roles in eukaryotic growth, differentiation and environmental adaptation. In model systems the ubiquitination of specific proteins contributes to the control of cell cycle progression, stress adaptation and metabolic reprogramming. We have combined molecular, cellular and proteomic approaches to examine the roles of ubiquitination in Candida albicans, because little is known about ubiquitination in this major fungal pathogen of humans. Independent null (ubi4/ubi4) and conditional (MET3p-UBI4/ubi4) mutations were constructed at the C. albicans polyubiquitin-encoding locus. These mutants displayed morphological and cell cycle defects, as well as sensitivity to thermal, oxidative and cell wall stresses. Furthermore, ubi4/ubi4 cells rapidly lost viability under starvation conditions. Consistent with these phenotypes, proteins with roles in stress responses (Gnd1, Pst2, Ssb1), metabolism (Acs2, Eno1, Fba1, Gpd2, Pdx3, Pgk1, Tkl1) and ubiquitination (Ubi4, Ubi3, Pre1, Pre3, Rpt5) were among the ubiquitination targets we identified, further indicating that ubiquitination plays key roles in growth, stress responses and metabolic adaptation in C. albicans. Clearly ubiquitination plays key roles in the regulation of fundamental cellular processes that underpin the pathogenicity of this medically important fungus. This was confirmed by the observation that the virulence of C. albicans ubi4/ubi4 cells is significantly attenuated.
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Identification of sumoylation targets, combined with inactivation of SMT3, reveals the impact of sumoylation upon growth, morphology, and stress resistance in the pathogen Candida albicans.
Mol. Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2011
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Posttranslational modifications of proteins play critical roles in the control of cellular differentiation, development, and environmental adaptation. In particular, the covalent attachment of the small ubiquitin-like modifier, SUMO, to target proteins (sumoylation) regulates cell cycle progression, transcription, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and stress responses. Here we combine proteomic, molecular, and cellular approaches to examine the roles of sumoylation in the major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans. Using an N-terminally FLAG-tagged SUMO, 31 sumoylated proteins were identified in C. albicans with roles in stress responses (e.g., Hsp60, Hsp70 family members, Hsp104), the cytoskeleton and polarized growth (e.g., Tub1, Cct7, Mlc1), secretion, and endocytosis (e.g., Lsp1, Sec24, Sec7). The output from this proteomic screen was entirely consistent with the phenotypes of C. albicans mutants in which the single SUMO-encoding locus (SMT3) was inactivated or down-regulated. C. albicans smt3/smt3 cells displayed defects in growth, morphology, cell separation, nuclear segregation, and chitin deposition, suggesting important roles for sumoylation in cell cycle control. Smt3/smt3 cells also displayed sensitivity to thermal, oxidative, and cell wall stresses as well as to the antifungal drug caspofungin. Mutation of consensus sumoylation sites in Hsp60 and Hsp104 affected the resistance of C. albicans to thermal stress. Furthermore, signaling via the cell integrity pathway was defective in C. albicans smt3/smt3 cells. These observations provide mechanistic explanations for many of the observed phenotypic effects of Smt3 inactivation upon C. albicans growth and environmental adaptation. Clearly sumoylation plays key roles in fundamental cellular processes that underpin the pathogenicity of this medically important fungus.
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A proteomic analysis of the salt, cadmium and peroxide stress responses in Candida albicans and the role of the Hog1 stress-activated MAPK in regulating the stress-induced proteome.
Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 10-14-2009
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Stress responses are important for the virulence of the major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans. In this study we employed a 2-DE approach to examine the impact of exposure to peroxide (5 mM H(2)O(2)), salt (300 mM NaCl) or cadmium stress (0.5 mM Cd(2+)) upon the C. albicans proteome. Highly reproducible changes in the C. albicans proteome were observed in response to each stress condition. Significantly more proteins were up-regulated in response to cadmium (77) than to the salt (35) or peroxide stresses (35). These proteomic changes displayed minimal overlap with those observed in the transcriptome under equivalent conditions and, importantly, revealed functional categories that respond to stress at the protein level but not the transcript level. Six proteins were up-regulated by all three conditions: Adh1, Atp2, Cip1, Eft2, Ssa1 and Ssb1, which is consistent with the concept that a core stress response exists in C. albicans. This is the first time that a fungal core stress response has been defined at the proteomic level. We have also shown that the Hog1 stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is activated in response to the stresses examined in this study, makes a major contribution to the C. albicans stress proteome.
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Dickeya species relatedness and clade structure determined by comparison of recA sequences.
Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2009
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Using sequences from the recA locus, we have produced a phylogeny of 188 Dickeya strains from culture collections and identified species relatedness and subspecies clade structure within the genus. Of the six recognized species, Dickeya paradisiaca, D. chrysanthemi and D. zeae were discriminated with long branch lengths. The clade containing the D. paradisiaca type strain included just one additional strain, isolated from banana in Colombia. Strains isolated from Chrysanthemum and Parthenium species made up most of the clade containing the D. chrysanthemi type strain, and the host range of this species was extended to include potato. The D. zeae clade had the largest number of sequevars and branched into two major sister clades that contained all of the Zea mays isolates, and were identified as phylotypes PI and PII. The host range was increased from six to 13 species, including potato. The recA sequence of an Australian sugar-cane strain was sufficiently distinct to rank as a new species-level branch. In contrast to these species, Dickeya dadantii, D. dianthicola and D. dieffenbachiae were distinguished with shorter branch lengths, indicating relatively closer relatedness. The recA sequence for the type strain of D. dadantii clustered separately from other strains of the species. However, sequence comparison of three additional loci revealed that the D. dadantii type strain grouped together with the six other D. dadantii strains that were sequenced. Analysis of all four loci indicated that the D. dadantii strains were most closely related to D. dieffenbachiae. Three further branches (DUC-1, -2 and -3) were associated with these three species, which all diverged from a common origin and can be considered as a species complex. The large clade containing the D. dianthicola type strain comprised 58 strains and had little sequence diversity. One sequevar accounted for the majority of these strains, which were isolated nearly exclusively from eight hosts from Europe. Isolation of this sequevar on multiple occasions from Dianthus and (more recently) potato demonstrates that this lineage has become established in these species. The D. dadantii clade comprised 11 sequevars, and the known host range of the species was extended from eight to 19 species. New hosts included several ornamental species and potato. The clade DUC-1 was made up exclusively of potato strains originating from Europe, which had identical sequences, whilst DUC-2 strains were isolated mostly from a variety of monocotyledonous species. A single strain from Aglaonema sp. made up DUC-3. A single sequevar constituted the D. dieffenbachiae clade. The phylogenetic method described will provide a simple means for identification to the species and intraspecies level, which will support efforts to control these pathogens based on monitoring and surveillance.
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Phylogenetic structure of Xanthomonas determined by comparison of gyrB sequences.
Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2009
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Previously, we have produced a phylogeny of species type strains from the plant-pathogenic genus Xanthomonas based on gyrB sequences. To evaluate this locus further for species and infraspecies identification, we sequenced an additional 203 strains comprising all the pathovar reference strains (which have defined plant hosts), 67 poorly characterized pathovars, currently classified as Xanthomonas campestris, and 59 unidentified xanthomonads. The well-characterized pathovars grouped either in clades containing their respective species type strain or in clades containing species related to Xanthomonas axonopodis. The Xanthomonas euvesicatoria, Xanthomonas perforans and Xanthomonas alfalfae species complex, Xanthomonas fuscans and Xanthomonas citri were discriminated as X. axonopodis-related clades and comprised a large proportion of unidentified strains as well as 80 pathovars representing all the X. axonopodis pathovars and many poorly characterized pathovars, greatly increasing the plant host ranges of the constituent species. Most xanthomonads from these three large clades were isolated from a taxonomically diverse range of plant hosts, including many weed species, from field systems in India, suggesting that these lineages became established and diversified in agricultural areas in this region. The majority of these xanthomonads had minimal sequence diversity, consistent with rapid and highly extensive pathovar diversification that has occurred in relatively recent times. Low-intensity farming practices may have provided conditions conducive to pathovar development, and evidence for pathovar diversification within other regional angiosperm floras is discussed. The gyrB locus was sufficiently discriminating to identify diversity within many species. Seven branches or clades were sufficiently distinct to be considered as potential novel species. This study has provided a comprehensive xanthomonad classification framework and has firmly established gyrB sequencing as a rapid and efficient identification tool.
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Proteomic and phenotypic profiling of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis shows that genotype is linked to virulence.
Mol. Ecol.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2009
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Population genetics of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) show that isolates are highly related and globally homogenous, data that are consistent with the recent epidemic spread of a previously endemic organism. Highly related isolates are predicted to be functionally similar due to low levels of heritable genetic diversity. To test this hypothesis, we took a global panel of Bd isolates and measured (i) the genetic relatedness among isolates, (ii) proteomic profiles of isolates, (iii) the susceptibility of isolates to the antifungal drug caspofungin, (iv) the variation among isolates in growth and phenotypic characteristics, and (v) the virulence of isolates against the European common toad Bufo bufo. Our results show (i) genotypic differentiation among isolates, (ii) proteomic differentiation among isolates, (iii) no significant differences in susceptibility to caspofungin, (iv) differentiation in growth and phenotypic/morphological characters, and (v) differential virulence in B. bufo. Specifically, our data show that Bd isolates can be profiled by their genotypic and proteomic characteristics, as well as by the size of their sporangia. Bd genotypic and phenotypic distance matrices are significantly correlated, showing that less-related isolates are more biologically unique. Mass spectrometry has identified a set of candidate genes associated with inter-isolate variation. Our data show that, despite its rapid global emergence, Bd isolates are not identical and differ in several important characters that are linked to virulence. We argue that future studies need to clarify the mechanism(s) and rate at which Bd is evolving, and the impact that such variation has on the host-pathogen dynamic.
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The evolutionary rewiring of ubiquitination targets has reprogrammed the regulation of carbon assimilation in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.
MBio
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Microbes must assimilate carbon to grow and colonize their niches. Transcript profiling has suggested that Candida albicans, a major pathogen of humans, regulates its carbon assimilation in an analogous fashion to the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, repressing metabolic pathways required for the use of alterative nonpreferred carbon sources when sugars are available. However, we show that there is significant dislocation between the proteome and transcriptome in C. albicans. Glucose triggers the degradation of the ICL1 and PCK1 transcripts in C. albicans, yet isocitrate lyase (Icl1) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck1) are stable and are retained. Indeed, numerous enzymes required for the assimilation of carboxylic and fatty acids are not degraded in response to glucose. However, when expressed in C. albicans, S. cerevisiae Icl1 (ScIcl1) is subjected to glucose-accelerated degradation, indicating that like S. cerevisiae, this pathogen has the molecular apparatus required to execute ubiquitin-dependent catabolite inactivation. C. albicans Icl1 (CaIcl1) lacks analogous ubiquitination sites and is stable under these conditions, but the addition of a ubiquitination site programs glucose-accelerated degradation of CaIcl1. Also, catabolite inactivation is slowed in C. albicans ubi4 cells. Ubiquitination sites are present in gluconeogenic and glyoxylate cycle enzymes from S. cerevisiae but absent from their C. albicans homologues. We conclude that evolutionary rewiring of ubiquitination targets has meant that following glucose exposure, C. albicans retains key metabolic functions, allowing it to continue to assimilate alternative carbon sources. This metabolic flexibility may be critical during infection, facilitating the rapid colonization of dynamic host niches containing complex arrays of nutrients. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic microbes must assimilate a range of carbon sources to grow and colonize their hosts. Current views about carbon assimilation in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans are strongly influenced by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae paradigm in which cells faced with choices of nutrients first use energetically favorable sugars, degrading enzymes required for the assimilation of less favorable alternative carbon sources. We show that this is not the case in C. albicans because there has been significant evolutionary rewiring of the molecular signals that promote enzyme degradation in response to glucose. As a result, this major pathogen of humans retains enzymes required for the utilization of physiologically relevant carbon sources such as lactic acid and fatty acids, allowing it to continue to use these host nutrients even when glucose is available. This phenomenon probably enhances efficient colonization of host niches where sugars are only transiently available.
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Survey of the camel urinary proteome by shotgun proteomics using a multiple database search strategy.
Proteomics
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We report the first survey of the dromedary camel urinary proteome. Proteins retained from ultrafiltration of urine were analysed by GeLC-MS/MS (SDS-PAGE followed by LC-MS/MS). In the absence of a complete camel genome sequence, the number of protein identifications was maximised by searching three primary sequence databases: Swiss-Prot, alpaca and camel EST. This search strategy enabled the identification of 1274 peptide sequences, of which 735 were found in at least two independent samples. Functional annotations for proteins identified from alpaca and camel EST sequences were mapped from basic local alignment search tool (protein) searches. These 735 peptides, which included many novel sequences found only in the camel EST database, were grouped to 147 protein descriptors. Gene ontology term analysis of human proteins with sequence similarity showed that camel urine may be particularly enriched in proteins from extracellular compartments and vesicles, and with functions that include carbohydrate-binding and peptidase inhibitor activities. If their biological functions are conserved between species, many of the camel urinary proteins could be involved in various stress and immune responses, and some may have antimicrobial activities.
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Quantitative proteomic analysis of yeast DNA replication proteins.
Methods
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Chromatin is dynamically regulated, and proteomic analysis of its composition can provide important information about chromatin functional components. Many DNA replication proteins for example bind chromatin at specific times during the cell cycle. Proteomic investigation can also be used to characterize changes in chromatin composition in response to perturbations such as DNA damage, while useful information is obtained by testing the effects on chromatin composition of mutations in chromosome stability pathways. We have successfully used the method of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for quantitative proteomic analysis of normal and pathological changes to yeast chromatin. Here we describe this proteomic method for analyzing changes to Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin, illustrating the procedure with an analysis of the changes that occur in chromatin composition as cells progress from a G1 phase block (induced by alpha factor) into S phase (in the presence of DNA replication inhibitor hydroxyurea).
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.