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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Can we teach core clinical obstetrics and gynaecology skills using low fidelity simulation in an interprofessional setting?
Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2014
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Core clinical skills acquisition is an essential component of undergraduate medical and midwifery education. Although interprofessional education is an increasingly common format for learning efficient teamwork in clinical medicine, its value in undergraduate education is less clear. We present a collaborative effort from the medical and midwifery schools of Monash University, Melbourne, towards the development of an educational package centred around a core skills-based workshop using low fidelity simulation models in an interprofessional setting. Detailed feedback on the package was positive with respect to the relevance of the teaching content, whether the topic was well taught by task trainers and simulation models used, pitch of level of teaching and perception of confidence gained in performing the skill on a real patient after attending the workshop. Overall, interprofessional core skills training using low fidelity simulation models introduced at an undergraduate level in medicine and midwifery had a good acceptance.
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Troublesome knowledge in pediatric surgical trainees: a qualitative study.
J Surg Educ
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2014
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Meyer and Land (2003) describe threshold concepts as being "akin to a portal, opening up a new and previously inaccessible way of thinking about something." As a consequence, threshold concepts have a transformational potential and may lead to an associated change in identity. The successful completion of pediatric surgical training in the United Kingdom is a lengthy and complex professional journey in which trainees emerge as consultants with a professional identity. We sought to explore how "threshold concepts" applied to pediatric surgical training with a view to identifying elements that were "troublesome."
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Benefits and challenges of multi-level learner rural general practices--an interview study with learners, staff and patients.
BMC Med Educ
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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General practices vary in the provision of training and education. Some practices have training as a major focus with the presence of multi-level learners and others host single learner groups or none at all. This study investigates the educational benefits and challenges associated with 'multi-level learner' practices.
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Community perceptions of a rural medical school: a pilot qualitative study.
Adv Med Educ Pract
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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This paper explores local community perceptions of a relatively new rural medical school. For the purposes of this paper, community engagement is conceptualized as involvement in planning, delivering, and evaluating the medical program. Although there are several reviews of patient involvement in medical curricula development, this study was designed to pilot an approach to exploring the perspectives of well members of the community in the transition of institutional policy on community engagement to one medical school.
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Facilitating the development of professional identity through peer assisted learning in medical education.
Adv Med Educ Pract
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Peer assisted learning (PAL) is well documented in the medical education literature. In this paper, the authors explored the role of PAL in a graduate entry medical program with respect to the development of professional identity. The paper draws on several publications of PAL from one medical school, but here uses the theoretical notion of legitimate peripheral participation in a medical school community of practice to shed light on learning through participation. As medical educators, the authors were particularly interested in the development of educational expertise in medical students, and the social constructs that facilitate this academic development.
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Empathy levels among health professional students: a cross-sectional study at two universities in Australia.
Adv Med Educ Pract
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Empathy is paramount in the health care setting, optimizing communication and rapport with patients. Recent empirical evidence suggests that empathy is associated with improved clinical outcomes. Therefore, given the importance of empathy in the health care setting, gaining a better understanding of students' attitudes and self-reported empathy is important. The objective of this study was to examine self-reported empathy levels of students enrolled in different health disciplines from two large Australian universities.
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Implementation of a multi-level evaluation strategy: a case study on a program for international medical graduates.
J Educ Eval Health Prof
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2011
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Evaluation of educational interventions is often focused on immediate and/or short-term metrics associated with knowledge and/or skills acquisition. We developed an educational intervention to support international medical graduates working in rural Victoria. We wanted an evaluation strategy that included participants reactions and considered transfer of learning to the workplace and retention of learning. However, with participants in distributed locations and limited program resources, this was likely to prove challenging. Elsewhere, we have reported the outcomes of this evaluation. In this educational development report, we describe our evaluation strategy as a case study, its underpinning theoretical framework, the strategy, and its benefits and challenges. The strategy sought to address issues of program structure, process, and outcomes. We used a modified version of Kirkpatricks model as a framework to map our evaluation of participants experiences, acquisition of knowledge and skills, and their application in the workplace. The predominant benefit was that most of the evaluation instruments allowed for personalization of the program. The baseline instruments provided a broad view of participants expectations, needs, and current perspective on their role. Immediate evaluation instruments allowed ongoing tailoring of the program to meet learning needs. Intermediate evaluations facilitated insight on the transfer of learning. The principal challenge related to the resource intensive nature of the evaluation strategy. A dedicated program administrator was required to manage data collection. Although resource-intensive, we recommend baseline, immediate, and intermediate data collection points, with multi-source feedback being especially illuminating. We believe our experiences may be valuable to faculty involved in program evaluations.
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Simulation for learning and teaching procedural skills: the state of the science.
Simul Healthc
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2011
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Simulation is increasingly used to support learning of procedural skills. Our panel was tasked with summarizing the "best evidence." We addressed the following question: To what extent does simulation support learning and teaching in procedural skills?
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Key challenges in simulated patient programs: an international comparative case study.
BMC Med Educ
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2011
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The literature on simulated or standardized patient (SP) methodology is expanding. However, at the level of the program, there are several gaps in the literature. We seek to fill this gap through documenting experiences from four programs in Australia, Canada, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. We focused on challenges in SP methodology, faculty, organisational structure and quality assurance.
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Learning surgical communication, leadership and teamwork through simulation.
J Surg Educ
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2011
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In Australia and New Zealand, surgical trainees are expected to develop competencies across 9 domains. Although structured training is provided in several domains, there is little or no formal program for professionalism, communication, collaboration, and management and leadership. The Australian federal Department of Health and Aging funded a pilot course in simulation-based education to address these competencies for surgical trainees. This article describes the course and evaluation.
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Stress management training for surgeons-a randomized, controlled, intervention study.
Ann. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2011
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Stress and coping influence performance. In this study, we evaluate a novel stress management intervention for surgeons.
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Community-based practice program in a rural medical school: benefits and challenges.
Med Teach
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2010
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Community-based education is a component of many medical curricula and may contribute to the solution of inequity in health services.
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Defining responsibilities of simulated patients in medical education.
Simul Healthc
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2010
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Simulated patients (SPs) play a critical role in medical education. The development of SP methodology has resulted in wide ranging responsibilities. For SPs to work effectively, we believed it was important to clearly articulate their responsibilities, and that this would be best achieved by consultation with all stakeholders-SPs, students, tutors, and administrators.
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Perspective: authentic patient perspectives in simulations for procedural and surgical skills.
Acad Med
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2010
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In this article, the authors consider the role of the patient in simulation-based training and assessment of clinical procedural skills. In recent years, there has been a progressive shift of emphasis from teacher-centered to student-centered education, resulting in a redefinition of approaches to medical education. Traditional models of transmission of information from an expert to a novice have been supplanted by a more student-centered approach. However, medical education is not a matter for teacher and student alone. At the center is always the patient, around whom everything must ultimately rotate. A further shift is occurring. The patient is becoming the focal point of medical teaching and learning. It is argued that this shift is necessary and that simulation in its widest sense can be used to support this process. However, sensitivity to what we are simulating is essential, especially when simulations purport to address patient perspectives. The essay first reviews the history of medical education "centeredness," then outlines ways in which real and simulated patients are currently involved in medical education. Patient-focused simulation (PFS) is described as a means of offering patients perspectives during the acquisition of clinical procedural and surgical skills. The authors draw on their experiences of developing PFS and preliminary work to "authenticate" simulations from patient perspectives. The essay concludes with speculation on the value of a "complementarity" model that acknowledges the authentic and equal perspectives of patients, students, clinicians, and teachers.
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Evaluation of mobile learning: students experiences in a new rural-based medical school.
BMC Med Educ
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2010
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Mobile learning (ML) is an emerging educational method with success dependent on many factors including the ML device, physical infrastructure and user characteristics. At Gippsland Medical School (GMS), students are given a laptop at the commencement of their four-year degree. We evaluated the educational impact of the ML program from students perspectives.
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Evaluation of a clinical communication programme for perioperative and surgical care practitioners.
Qual Saf Health Care
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2010
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Communication is integral to clinical work. This paper describes a communication programme (CP) designed for two new professional roles. Training in communication is often focused on interactions with patients. Equally important is supporting clinicians to communicate with each other. The authors devised a CP for perioperative specialist and surgical care practitioners.
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The Imperial Stress Assessment Tool (ISAT): a feasible, reliable and valid approach to measuring stress in the operating room.
World J Surg
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2010
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Stress can impair surgical performance and may compromise patient safety. This prospective, cross-sectional study describes the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Imperial Stress Assessment Tool (ISAT) as an approach to measuring stress during surgery.
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Actor training for surgical team simulations.
Med Teach
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2010
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Immersive simulations can enable surgeons to learn complex sets of skills required for safe surgical practice without risk to patients. However, recruiting healthcare professionals to support surgeons training as members of an operating theatre (OT) team is challenging and resource intensive.
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Rating medical emergency teamwork performance: development of the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM).
Resuscitation
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2010
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To develop a valid, reliable and feasible teamwork assessment measure for emergency resuscitation team performance.
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Factors compromising safety in surgery: stressful events in the operating room.
Am. J. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2010
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Stressful events occur in the operating room (OR) with potentially severe consequences for patient safety. We recorded the incidence of these events in the OR, assessed the levels of stress that they caused, and investigated their detectability.
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Distributed simulation--accessible immersive training.
Med Teach
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2010
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Distributed simulation (DS) is the concept of high-fidelity immersive simulation on-demand, made widely available wherever and whenever it is required. DS provides an easily transportable, self-contained set for creating simulated environments within an inflatable enclosure, at a small fraction of the cost of dedicated, static simulation facilities. High-fidelity simulation is currently confined to a relatively small number of specialised centres. This is largely because full-immersion simulation is perceived to require static, dedicated and sophisticated equipment, supported by expert faculty. Alternatives are needed for healthcare professionals who cannot access such centres. We propose that elements of immersive simulations can be provided within a lightweight, low-cost and self-contained setting which is portable and can therefore be accessed by a wide range of clinicians. We will argue that mobile simulated environments can be taken to where they are needed, making simulation more widely available. We develop the notion that a simulation environment need not be a fixed, static resource, but rather a container for a range of activities and performances, designed around the needs of individual users. We critically examine the potential of DS to widen access to an otherwise limited resource, putting flexible, just in time training within reach of all clinicians. Finally, we frame DS as a disruptive innovation with potential to radically alter the landscape of simulation-based training.
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Evaluating training for a simulated team in complex whole procedure simulations in the endovascular suite.
Med Teach
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2009
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Simulators supporting the development of technical skills for complex procedures are gaining prominence. Safe performance of complex procedures requires effective team interactions. Our research group creates whole procedure simulations to produce the psychological fidelity of clinical settings. Recruitment of real interventional team (IT) members has proved challenging. Actors as a simulated team are expensive. We hypothesised that medical students and trainees in a vascular unit could authentically portray members of the endovascular suite for carotid stenting.
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Managing intraoperative stress: what do surgeons want from a crisis training program?
Am. J. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2009
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Current surgical training provides little opportunity for surgeons to recognize and manage intraoperative stress before it affects performance and compromises patient safety. We explored the perceived need for structured stress training and propose an intervention design that may be acceptable and appropriate.
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The impact of stress on surgical performance: a systematic review of the literature.
Surgery
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2009
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Safe surgical practice requires a combination of technical and nontechnical abilities. Both sets of skills can be impaired by intra-operative stress, compromising performance and patient safety. This systematic review aims to assess the effects of intra-operative stress on surgical performance.
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Teaching communication skills using the integrated procedural performance instrument (IPPI): a randomized controlled trial.
Am. J. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2009
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The Integrated Procedural Performance Instrument (IPPI) uses various bench-top models positioned to standardized patients (SP) to recreate realistic clinical encounters. This study assessed the effectiveness of using an IPPI format as a teaching tool for communication skills.
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Psychometric properties of an integrated assessment of technical and communication skills.
Am. J. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2009
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The Integrated Procedural Performance Instrument (IPPI) consists of clinical scenarios in which bench-top models are positioned to simulated patients. Trainees are required to perform technical skills while engaging with the patient. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an IPPI format examination could discriminate between different levels of trainees.
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Objective structured assessment of debriefing: bringing science to the art of debriefing in surgery.
Ann. Surg.
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: To identify the features of effective debriefing and to use this to develop and validate a tool for assessing such debriefings.
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Simulation in clinical teaching and learning.
Med. J. Aust.
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Simulation-based education (SBE) is a rapidly developing method of supplementing and enhancing the clinical education of medical students. Clinical situations are simulated for teaching and learning purposes, creating opportunities for deliberate practice of new skills without involving real patients. Simulation takes many forms, from simple skills training models to computerised full-body mannequins, so that the needs of learners at each stage of their education can be targeted. Emerging evidence supports the value of simulation as an educational technique; to be effective it needs to be integrated into the curriculum in a way that promotes transfer of the skills learnt to clinical practice. Currently, SBE initiatives in Australia are fragmented and depend on local enthusiasts; Health Workforce Australia is driving initiatives to develop a more coordinated national approach to optimise the benefits of simulation.
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Identifying best practice guidelines for debriefing in surgery: a tri-continental study.
Am. J. Surg.
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Changes in surgical training have decreased opportunities for experiential learning in the operating room (OR). With this decrease, a commensurate increase in debriefing-dependent simulation-based activities has occurred. Effective debriefing could optimize learning from both simulated and real clinical encounters.
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Supporting international medical graduates in rural Australia: a mixed methods evaluation.
Rural Remote Health
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In Australia, international medical graduates (IMGs) make a substantial contribution to rural medical workforces. They often face significant communication, language, professional and cultural barriers, in addition to the other challenges of rural clinical practice. The Gippsland Inspiring Professional Standards among International Experts (GIPSIE) program was designed to provide educational support to IMGs across a large geographical region using innovative educational methods to ultimately build capacity in the provision of rural medical education. GIPSIE offered 5 sessions over 3 months. Simulation-based training was a prominent theme and addressed clinical knowledge, attitudes and skills and included a range of activities (eg procedural skills training with benchtop models, management of the acutely ill patient with SimMan, patient assessment skills with simulated patients). Diverse clinical communication skills were explored (eg teamwork, handover, telephone, critical information). Audiovisual review of performance was enabled through the use of iPod nano devices. GIPSIE was underpinned by a website offering diverse learning resources. Content experts were invited to lead sessions that integrated knowledge and skills reflecting local practice.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.