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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
IL-8 Gene Variants are Associated with Lung Function Decline and Multidimensional BODE Index in COPD Patients But Not with Disease Susceptibility: A Validation Study.
COPD
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2014
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Abstract Background and objective: COPD is a leading cause of dead worldwide and tobacco smoking is its major risk factor. IL8 is a proinflammatory chemokine mainly involved in the acute inflammatory reaction. The aim of this study was to test the association of IL-8, CXCR1 and CXCR2 gene variants and COPD susceptibility as part of a replication study and explore the effect of these variations in disease progression. Methods: 9 tagSNPs were genotyped in 728 Caucasian individuals (196 COPD patients, 80 smokers and 452 non-smoking controls). Pulmonary compromise was evaluated using spirometry and clinical parameters at baseline and annually over a 2 years period. We also determined plasma levels of TNF-?, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-16 in COPD patients. Results: There was a lack of association between gene variants or haplotypes with predisposition to COPD. No correlation was observed between the polymorphisms and cytokines levels. Interestingly, significant associations were found between carriers of the rs4073A (OR = 3.53, CI 1.34-9.35, p = 0.01), rs2227306C (OR = 5.65, CI 1.75-18.88, p = 0.004) and rs2227307T (OR = 4.52, CI = 1.49-12.82, p = 0.007) alleles in the IL-8 gene and patients who scored higher in the BODE index and showed an important decrease in their FEV1 and FVC during the 2 years follow-up period (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Despite no association was found between the studied genes and COPD susceptibility, three polymorphisms in the IL-8 gene appear to be involved in a worse progression of the disease, with an affectation beyond the pulmonary function and importantly, a reduction in lung function along the follow-up years.
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Relationships between serum resistin and fat intake, serum lipid concentrations and adiposity in the general population.
J. Atheroscler. Thromb.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
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The serum resistin level is associated with the incidence of ischemic heart disease in the general population. We analyzed the associations between serum resistin and fat intake, serum lipid concentrations and adiposity in the general population.
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The Association of Resistin with Coronary Disease in the General Population.
J. Atheroscler. Thromb.
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2013
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Aims: To explore the association between resistin expression and the incidence of ischemic heart disease in the general population. Methods: A follow-up study of 6636 adults recruited randomly from the general population. Results: The serum resistin concentration was higher in women (6.1 ng/mL; CI95%=6.0-6.2) than in men (5.6 ng/mL; CI95%=5.5-5.7). Individuals in the 5th quintile or higher of resistin (RQ5) were younger (P?0.001) and had a lower prevalence of arterial hypertension (P?0.001), abdominal obesity (P?0.001), diabetes (P?0.001) and dyslipidemia (P?0.001). The cardiovascular risk estimated by the Framingham function was also lower in the RQ5 subgroup (P?0.001); however, the prevalence of smoking was higher (P?0.001), as was the prevalence of low HDL cholesterol (P?0.001). After 3.5 years of follow-up, the RQ5 subgroup had a higher incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI, RR=1.9; CI95%=1.01-3.54). In the population without diabetes, the RQ5 subgroup had a higher risk of AMI (RR=2.4; CI95%=1.10-5.17), and the risk of AMI was highest in women in this group (4.97; CI95%=1.33-18.57). The risk levels were significant in the Cox models adjusted for age, sex and smoking; and the hazard ratio was 2.5 for AMI (CI95%=1.29-4.70) in the sample of patients matched by sex and smoking status. Conclusions: Resistin may be a risk marker for ischemic heart disease in the general population. The serum resistin concentration is higher in women, and the associated increase in the risk of AMI based on the resistin level is also higher in women than in men.
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Factors associated with knowledge and control of arterial hypertension in the Canary Islands.
Rev Esp Cardiol (Engl Ed)
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2011
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To analyze the factors associated with knowledge and control of hypertension in the adult population of the Canary Islands (18-75 years).
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Hemodynamics and metabolism at low versus moderate altitudes.
High Alt. Med. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2011
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Despite the higher prevalence of diabetes and hypertension in populations residing at moderate altitudes, mortality in these populations is lower than in populations residing at low altitudes. To examine whether metabolic and hemodynamic differences can explain this apparent paradox, we performed a cross-sectional study of a general population sample recruited in the Canary Islands, Spain (n=6729). We recorded altitude of residence, age, heart rate, blood pressure, body mass index, social class, physical activity, energy intake, alcohol intake, smoking habit, prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. In a subsample (n=903), we recorded serum concentration of cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, C peptide, leptin, soluble leptin receptor (sObR), C-reactive protein, resistin, soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), and paraoxonase activity (PON), and we estimated insulin resistance and free leptin index. We found an inverse association between altitude and heart rate (p<0.001), leptin (p<0.001), free leptin index (p<0.001), resistin (p<0.001), and sCD40L (p<0.05) and a direct association between altitude and hypertension (odds ratio=1.29 for altitude >600 m; 95% confidence interval=1.03-1.62), glycemia (p<0.05), C peptide (p<0.001), insulin resistance (p<0.001), sObR (p<0.05), and PON (p<0.05). When social class was included in the multivariate model, the association with PON was no longer significant. In conclusion, individuals residing at moderate altitudes have a lower heart rate and lower serum concentration of total leptin, free leptin, and sCD40L. These differences may partially explain the lower mortality in these populations.
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Autoantibody detection with indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells: starting serum dilutions for systemic rheumatic diseases.
Immunol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
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Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are determined, among other reasons, to identify samples which need a second test to detect the associated specificities. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical and economic impact generated by using an initial dilution for ANA of 1:160. We analyzed all samples for which ANA, anti-ENA and anti-dsDNA were requested over a 1-year period. ANA were detected by indirect immunofluorescence. Anti-ENA were analyzed with a combination of techniques. Anti-dsDNA were detected by radioimmunoassay. Cost analysis was performed by calculating the difference between two cut-offs (ANA 1:40 and 1:160). A total of 13,233 samples were processed for ANA, of which 59.9% were positive with the 1:40 cut-off and 39.2% with the 1:160 cut-off. At ANA titer 1:40, 0.2% of the samples were anti-ENA-positive and 2.2% were anti-dsDNA positive. Only ANA dilutions of 1:160 and higher showed significantly increased positive predictive value for anti-ENA (1.5 versus 0.2, p=0.029) and anti-dsDNA (8.3 versus 2.2, p<0.001) compared to the 1:40 titer. With the 1:160 cut-off, 16.6% fewer ANA tests, 41.8% fewer anti-ENA determinations and 36.4% fewer anti-dsDNA tests would have been needed. The average saving was 0.87 cost-units per sample (1 unit=2.06euro). We conclude that setting the starting dilution for ANA at 1:160 avoids unnecessary studies, increases the positive predictive values of ANA for anti-ENA and anti-dsDNA, and generates clinical and economic benefits.
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Sex hormones and autoimmunity.
Immunol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2010
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Autoimmune diseases occur more in women than in men, and this may be attributable to the role of estrogens. Androgens promote autoimmune diseases with a profile of type 1 cytokines, such as rheumatoid arthritis, whereas estrogens promote autoimmune diseases with a type 2 cytokine profile, like systemic lupus erythematosus. Both androgens and estrogens regulate the Th1/Th2 balance. Type 1 autoimmune diseases are improved when decrease type 1 cytokines (i.e. during fasting), or when there is a rise in type 2 cytokines (increased estrogens, as in pregnancy). Type 2 autoimmune diseases improve when type 2 cytokines are diminished (decreased estrogen, as in post-partum period) or when type 1 response is stimulated.
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Efficiency of different strategies to detect autoantibodies to extractable nuclear antigens.
J. Immunol. Methods
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2010
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Autoantibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (anti-ENA) are identified mainly in samples positive for antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Although the method of choice for ANA screening is indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), several techniques are available to detect anti-ENA. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of five different strategies to determine anti-ENA. During a 2-year period we screened ANA in 30375 samples with IIF, and the 4475 samples ANA positive were tested for anti-ENA by double immune diffusion screening or fluoroenzymeimmunoassay (Screening FI); anti-ENA specificities were then determined by line immunoassay (LIA) or fluoroenzymeimmunoassay (FI). We compared five strategies that involved FI or LIA identification of anti-ENA with or without prior screening, or an algorithm that combined fluorescence pattern, number of anti-ENA specificities requested by the clinician and ANA dilution titer. One cost unit (CU) was defined as the cost of 1 test of ANA determination. We detected 553 anti-ENA positive samples. The most efficient strategy was the algorithm, at a cost of 3.3 CU per sample processed, the second most efficient strategy was screening plus FI identification (cost=3.8 CU), and the third most efficient strategy was screening plus LIA identification (cost=3.9 CU). The fourth most efficient strategy was FI identification without prior screening (13.3 CU per sample) and the least efficient was LIA identification without prior screening (13.6 CU per sample). In conclusion, an algorithm that combined techniques for detection, ANA titer, fluorescence pattern and number of specificities requested was the most efficient strategy for determining anti-ENA.
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[The waist to height ratio as an index of cardiovascular risk and diabetes].
Med Clin (Barc)
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2010
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To identify the anthropometric index that best detects cardiovascular risk (CVR) and type 2 diabetes (DM2) in the adult Spanish population and to determine its cut-off point.
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[Lifestyle and treatment adherence of type 2 diabetes mellitus people in the Canary Islands].
Rev. Esp. Salud Publica
PUBLISHED: 11-07-2009
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The Canary Islands population experiences the highest type 2 diabetes (DM2) mortality in Spain. We studied lifestyle, unknown DM2 and treatment adherence in diabetics of these islands.
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[Framingham function estimates the risk of cardio vascular mortality more effectively than SCORE function in the population of the Canary Islands (Spain)].
Gac Sanit
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2009
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To compare the performance of the Framingham and SCORE functions to estimate fatal cardiovascular events. In addition, we explored the ability of both functions to detect the risk contributed by factors not included in their equations: sedentariness, obesity, abdominal circumference, abdomen/height razón, abdomen/pelvis ratio, and excessive alcohol consumption.
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Microsatellite polymorphisms in the EGFR, NOTCH4 and E2F4 genes and their association with breast cancer risk.
Int. J. Biol. Markers
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The sequences of many human genes that encode proteins involved in cancer contain polymorphic microsatellites. Variations in microsatellite length may constitute risk factors in several human diseases, a possibility that has been little explored in breast cancer. Among the genes that contain polymorphic microsatellites are EGFR, NOTCH4 and E2F4. The length of some of these microsatellites has been associated with breast cancer risk.
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Factors associated with parietal cell autoantibodies in the general population.
Immunol. Lett.
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The presence in serum of parietal cell autoantibodies (PCA) is a characteristic of autoimmune gastritis. We determined the prevalence of PCA in the general population and investigate their association with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and lifestyle factors related with autoimmune gastritis. A cross-sectional study was performed, involving 429 individuals enrolled in a cohort study of the general population of the Canary Islands. All participants underwent physical examination, provided a blood sample and responded to a questionnaire regarding health and lifestyle factors. Serum concentrations of PCA, soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), C-peptide and glucose (to determine insulin resistance) were measured. The association of PCA with the other factors was determined with bivariate analysis, and logistic regression models were used to adjust the associations for age and sex. The prevalence of PCA was 7.8% (95% CI=10.3-5.3). The factors associated with PCA were female sex (p=0.032), insulin resistance (p=0.016), menopause (p=0.029) and sCD40L (p=0.019). Alcohol consumption (p=0.006) and smoking (p=0.005) were associated with low prevalences of PCA. After adjustment for age and sex, the association with PCA was confirmed for smoking (OR=0.1 [0.0-0.9]), alcohol consumption (OR=0.3 [0.1-0.9]), insulin resistance (OR=2.4 [1.1-4.9]), female sex (OR=2.4 [1.1-5.3]), sCD40L (OR=3.7 [1.2-11.4]) and menopause (OR=5.3 [1.2-23.3]). In conclusion, smoking and alcohol consumption acted as protective factors against the appearance of PCA in the general population, whereas female sex, menopause, insulin resistance and elevated serum sCD40L were risk markers for PCA. In patients who smoke or drink alcohol, clinicians should be cautious when using PCA to rule out autoimmune gastritis.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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