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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Black Men Who Have Sex with Men, Sexual Risk-Taking, and Willingness to Use Rapid Home HIV Tests.
Prev Sci
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2014
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The availability of rapid home-based HIV testing (RHT) in the USA has provided us with a valuable, new option in our efforts to identify more people living with HIV and to do so sooner. Furthermore, it is possible that RHT will be or is currently being used as a means of learning one's own and one's partner's HIV status prior to engaging in condomless intercourse. Data regarding knowledge and willingness to use RHT, however, is very limited. In particular, no studies have investigated RHT use among Black men who have sex with men (BMSM). Understanding RHT use among BMSM is critical as we have observed alarming rates of HIV prevalence among this group, and RHT may provide an opportunity to slow HIV transmission among BMSM. In order to better understand RHT, we assessed knowledge, willingness to use and actual use of RHT, HIV testing history, substance use, and sexual risk-taking among 387 HIV-negative BMSM and 157 HIV-positive BMSM attending a community event in the southeastern USA. We used generalized linear modeling to assess factors associated with their willingness to use RHT. Although familiarity with the availability of RHT was somewhat limited among these men, a substantial portion of BMSM did report an interest in using RHT, including with their sex partners. Among HIV-negative BMSM, however, we found a negative relationship between willingness to use RHT and sexual risk-taking, i.e., higher numbers of condomless anal sex acts were associated with a reduction in willingness to use RHT. It appears that men who report the greatest risk-taking for HIV are least interested in RHT. Future research should focus on better understanding concerns regarding RHT among at-risk HIV-negative men and should investigate the usefulness of using RHT as a HIV prevention method.
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Psychosocial factors related to willingness to use pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention among Black men who have sex with men attending a community event.
Sex Health
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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Objectives In the US, Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) holds tremendous promise for curbing the HIV/AIDS epidemic among these men. However, many psychosocial components must be addressed in order to implement this prevention tool effectively among BMSM.
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Using quality improvement to optimise paediatric discharge efficiency.
BMJ Qual Saf
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2014
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Bed capacity management is a critical issue facing hospital administrators, and inefficient discharges impact patient flow throughout the hospital. National recommendations include a focus on providing care that is timely and efficient, but a lack of standardised discharge criteria at our institution contributed to unpredictable discharge timing and lengthy delays. Our objective was to increase the percentage of Hospital Medicine patients discharged within 2 h of meeting criteria from 42% to 80%.
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Randomized clinical trial of HIV treatment adherence counseling interventions for people living with HIV and limited health literacy.
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Limited health literacy is a known barrier to medication adherence among people living with HIV. Adherence improvement interventions are urgently needed for this vulnerable population.
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The Achilles Heel of HIV Treatment for Prevention: History of Sexually Transmitted Coinfections among People Living with HIV/AIDS Receiving Antiretroviral Therapies.
J Int Assoc Physicians AIDS Care (Chic)
PUBLISHED: 10-11-2011
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Background: Antiretroviral therapies (ARTs) offer promising new avenues for HIV prevention. Unfortunately, people infected with HIV who have co-occurring sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are more infectious than suggested by the amount of virus in their peripheral blood. We examined the history of sexually transmitted coinfections in people living with HIV.
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Screening for diabetes in an African American community: identifying characteristics associated with abnormal blood glucose readings.
J Natl Med Assoc
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2011
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To identify characteristics associated with abnormal blood glucose readings among African Americans and to determine the potential value of a more targeted approach to community-based screenings for type 2 diabetes.
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Sexual HIV transmission and antiretroviral therapy: a prospective cohort study of behavioral risk factors among men and women living with HIV/AIDS.
Ann Behav Med
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2011
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Using antiretroviral therapies for HIV prevention relies on patient adherence and avoidance of co-occurring sexually transmitted infections.
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Brief behavioral self-regulation counseling for HIV treatment adherence delivered by cell phone: an initial test of concept trial.
AIDS Patient Care STDS
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2011
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Affordable and effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence interventions are needed for many patients to promote positive treatment outcomes and prevent viral resistance. We conducted a two-arm randomized trial (n?=?40 men and women receiving and less than 95% adherent to ART) to test a single office session followed by four biweekly cell phone counseling sessions that were grounded in behavioral self-management model of medication adherence using data from phone-based unannounced pill counts to provide feedback-guided adherence strategies. The control condition received usual care and matched office and cell phone/pill count contacts. Participants were baseline assessed and followed with biweekly unannounced pill counts and 4-month from baseline computerized interviews (39/40 retained). Results showed that the self-regulation counseling delivered by cell phone demonstrated significant improvements in adherence compared to the control condition; adherence improved from 87% of pills taken at baseline to 94% adherence 4 months after baseline, p?
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Falling through the cracks: unmet health service needs among people living with HIV in Atlanta, Georgia.
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2011
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Despite growing numbers of people living with HIV (PLWH), the landscape of related services is shrinking. This study investigated health and social service needs of men (N = 489) and women (N = 165) living with HIV in Atlanta, GA. Participants completed confidential measures asking about the health and social services they needed and accessed. Results showed an array of health and social service needs among PLWH; failure to access services was prevalent. Hunger was among the most common basic needs, reported by greater than 60% of men and women. For men, unmet service needs were associated with fewer years since testing positive for HIV, higher CD4+ T cell values, experiencing more stressors and depression, and greater quantity of alcohol use. For women, failure to access services was associated with experiencing depression and not receiving HIV medications. Providing basic services to PLWH remains a public health priority and a moral imperative.
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Integrated behavioral intervention to improve HIV/AIDS treatment adherence and reduce HIV transmission.
Am J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2011
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We conducted a randomized clinical trial to test an integrated behavioral intervention designed to enhance using HIV treatment as prevention by improving medication adherence, reducing risks for other sexually transmitted infections, and minimizing risk compensation beliefs.
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Health and treatment implications of food insufficiency among people living with HIV/AIDS, Atlanta, Georgia.
J Urban Health
PUBLISHED: 04-27-2010
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HIV/AIDS is concentrated among the inner-city poor and poverty may directly interfere with HIV treatment. This study examined food insufficiency in relation to HIV-related health and treatment. A sample of 344 men and women living with HIV/AIDS in Atlanta, Georgia completed measures of food security, health, and HIV disease progression and treatment. HIV treatment adherence was monitored using unannounced pill counts. Results showed that half of people living with HIV/AIDS in this study lacked sufficient food, and food insufficiency was associated with multiple indicators of poor health, including higher HIV viral loads, lower CD4 cell counts, and poorer treatment adherence. Adjusted analyses showed that food insufficiency predicted HIV treatment non-adherence over and above years of education, employment status, income, housing, depression, social support, and non-alcohol substance use. Hunger and food insecurity are prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS, and food insufficiency is closely related to multiple HIV-related health indicators, particularly medication adherence. Interventions that provide consistent and sustained meals to people living with HIV/AIDS are urgently needed.
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HIV super-infection beliefs and sexual practices of people living with HIV/AIDS.
Sex Health
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2010
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People living with HIV can be reinfected with a new viral strain resulting in potential treatment-resistant recombinant virus known as HIV super-infection. Individuals beliefs about the risks for HIV super-infection may have significant effects on the sexual behaviours of people living with HIV/AIDS. HIV super-infection beliefs and sexual behaviours among people living with HIV/AIDS were examined in the present study.
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Prevalence and clinical implications of interactive toxicity beliefs regarding mixing alcohol and antiretroviral therapies among people living with HIV/AIDS.
AIDS Patient Care STDS
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2009
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Alcohol use is a barrier to medication adherence. Beyond the cognitive effects of intoxication, people living with HIV/AIDS who believe that alcohol should not be mixed with their medications may temporarily stop taking medications when drinking. To examine the effects of alcohol-treatment beliefs on HIV treatment adherence. People living with HIV/AIDS who were receiving treatment (n = 145) were recruited from community and clinical services during the period between January 2006 and May 2008 to complete measures of substance use and alcohol-antiretroviral (ARV) interactive toxicity beliefs (e.g., alcohol breaks down HIV medications so they will not work). Medication adherence was monitored using unannounced telephone-based pill counts. Forty percent of participants were currently using alcohol and nearly one in four drinkers reported stopping their medications when drinking. Beliefs that mixing alcohol and medications is toxic were common among drinkers and nondrinkers, with most beliefs endorsed more frequently by non-drinkers. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that stopping ARVs when drinking was associated with treatment nonadherence over and above quantity/frequency of alcohol use and problem drinking. Beliefs that alcohol and ARVs should not be mixed and that treatments should be interrupted when drinking are common among people living with HIV/AIDS. Clinicians should educate patients about the necessity of continuing to take ARV medications without interruption even if they are drinking alcohol.
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Longitudinal analysis of depressive symptoms and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.
Diabetes Care
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2009
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To compare whether depressive symptoms are more strongly related to subsequent or prior glycemic control in type 2 diabetes and to test whether patient characteristics modify these longitudinal associations.
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Racial differences in the discussion and treatment of depressive symptoms accompanying type 2 diabetes.
Diabetes Res. Clin. Pract.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2009
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To compare rates of discussion of and treatment for depression among African Americans and Whites with diabetes.
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Variations in hypertension-related outcomes among Blacks, Whites and Hispanics in two large urban areas and in the United States.
Ethn Dis
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This study compared the hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment and control in Chicago, Illinois and Detroit, Michigan to that of the general United States population (aged > or = 25 years) for the period 2001-2003. We examined whether and how much 1) urban populations have less favorable hypertension-related outcomes and 2) the rates of racial/ethnic minorities lag behind those of Whites in order to determine if the national data understate the magnitude of hypertension-related outcomes and racial/ethnic disparities in two large cities in the Midwestern region of the United States and perhaps others.
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Intentional non-adherence to medications among HIV positive alcohol drinkers: prospective study of interactive toxicity beliefs.
J Gen Intern Med
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Antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence is key to successful treatment of HIV infection and alcohol is a known barrier to adherence. Beyond intoxication, ART adherence is impacted by beliefs that mixing alcohol and medications is toxic.
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Measuring adverse events and levels of harm in pediatric inpatients with the Global Trigger Tool.
Pediatrics
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To evaluate and characterize the Global Trigger Tools (GTTs) utility in a pediatric population; to measure the rate of harm at our institution and compare it with previously established trigger tools and benchmark rates; and to describe the distribution of harm of the detected events.
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Hypertension: development of a prediction model to adjust self-reported hypertension prevalence at the community level.
BMC Health Serv Res
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Accurate estimates of hypertension prevalence are critical for assessment of population health and for planning and implementing prevention and health care programs. While self-reported data is often more economically feasible and readily available compared to clinically measured HBP, these reports may underestimate clinical prevalence to varying degrees. Understanding the accuracy of self-reported data and developing prediction models that correct for underreporting of hypertension in self-reported data can be critical tools in the development of more accurate population level estimates, and in planning population-based interventions to reduce the risk of, or more effectively treat, hypertension. This study examines the accuracy of self-reported survey data in describing prevalence of clinically measured hypertension in two racially and ethnically diverse urban samples, and evaluates a mechanism to correct self-reported data in order to more accurately reflect clinical hypertension prevalence.
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Alcohol and adherence to antiretroviral medications: interactive toxicity beliefs among people living with HIV.
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care
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When taken without interruption, antiretroviral therapies (ART) effectively treat HIV infection. Alcohol is a well-known direct and indirect influence on ART adherence. Believing that drinking is harmful while taking ART (interactive toxicity beliefs) is also associated with poor adherence. The current study included 333 people living with HIV who were taking ART and actively using alcohol. Participants were recruited from health care providers and social services in a major southern U.S. city. Results showed that 52% of persons found non-adherent to ART stated that they stopped taking their medications when they were drinking. Multivariate analyses showed that interrupting treatment when drinking was related to current non-adherence, over and above several common correlates of non-adherence including frequency of alcohol use itself. These results confirm and extend past research, indicating an urgent need for medication adherence interventions designed for people living with HIV who drink.
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Use of dietary supplements among people living with HIV/AIDS is associated with vulnerability to medical misinformation on the internet.
AIDS Res Ther
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Use of dietary supplements is common among people living with HIV/AIDS. Because dietary supplements are used in the context of other health behaviors, they may have direct and indirect health benefits. However, supplements may also be associated with vulnerability to medical misinformation and unfounded health claims. We examined use of dietary supplements among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH) and the association between use of dietary supplements and believing medical misinformation.
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Viral Suppression and Antiretroviral Medication Adherence Among Alcohol Using HIV-Positive Adults.
Int J Behav Med
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Substance use is a known predictor of poor adherence to antiretroviral therapies (ART) in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Less studied is the association between substance use and treatment outcomes, namely, suppression of HIV replication.
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Food insecurity and antiretroviral adherence among HIV positive adults who drink alcohol.
J Behav Med
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Food insecurity is associated with HIV treatment non-adherence and poor health outcomes for people living with HIV/AIDS. Given the poor nutritional status common to people who drink alcohol, food insecurity may be particularly problematic for HIV positive individuals who drink alcohol. To examine food insecurity among HIV positive men and women who drink alcohol and its association with antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, health outcomes and health service utilization. Adults living with HIV (N = 183) in Atlanta, Georgia who reported alcohol use in the previous week and were receiving ART participated in a 12-month cohort. Participants were recruited from infectious disease clinics and social services to complete computerized interviews, monthly-unannounced pill counts to monitor ART adherence, and daily cell-phone delivered interactive-text assessments for alcohol use. Forty-three percent of participants experienced food insecurity during at least one month of the study period. Food insecurity was independently associated with suboptimal ART adherence and less suppressed HIV viral load over. Individuals who experienced food insecurity also had histories of more medical and psychiatric hospitalizations, and greater mental health problems. Food insecurity is prevalent among alcohol using people receiving ART and food insecurity is associated with treatment non-adherence, poor health outcomes, and increased medical and psychiatric hospitalizations.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.