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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) Consensus Review for Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2014
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Most women diagnosed with malignant ovarian germ cell tumors have curable disease and experience excellent survival with manageable treatment-associated morbidity, related both to tumor biology and improvements in treatment over the last 4 decades. Malignant ovarian germ cell tumors occur predominantly in girls, adolescents, and young women and are often unilateral tumors of early stage, although advanced-stage disease occurs in approximately 30% of patients. Tumors are usually chemosensitive, thereby allowing fertility-sparing surgery in most women with high chance of cure. Differences in practice do exist among providers in various subspecialties and geographic areas. In most settings, collaborative efforts among specialties allow the optimal treatment of women with these rare tumors, and implementation of standard guidelines at an international level should translate to effective clinical trial design, rapid accrual to clinical trials, and universally improved patient outcomes.This consensus guideline represents a summary of recommendations for diagnosis and management that has been agreed upon by cooperative groups worldwide. It builds upon individual publications including previously published summary documents and provides the most current practice standards validated worldwide.
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Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) Consensus Review for Mucinous Ovarian Carcinoma.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2014
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Mucinous carcinomas of the ovary can be primary or metastatic in origin. Improvements in the pathological diagnosis have increased the ability to distinguish between primary and metastatic ovarian cancers and shown that primary mucinous carcinomas are a rare subtype of ovarian cancer. Most tumors are diagnosed at an early stage, and the prognosis after surgery is good. Advanced or recurrent mucinous carcinoma of the ovary responds poorly to current cytotoxic treatments, and the prognosis is poor. Here, we review the guidelines for surgery and the results of treatment of advanced and recurrent disease. Chemotherapy with platinum and paclitaxel is currently used to treat advanced disease, but the effect of these drugs is modest, and new treatments are needed.
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Reprogramming Human Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells to Neurons Using Recombinant Proteins.
Stem Cells Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
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Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to an altered lineage by overexpressing specific transcription factors. To avoid introducing exogenous genetic material into the genome of host cells, cell-penetrating peptides can be used to deliver transcription factors into cells for reprogramming. Position-dependent C-end rule (CendR) cell- and tissue-penetrating peptides provide an alternative to the conventional cell-penetrating peptides, such as polyarginine. In this study, we used a prototypic, already active CendR peptide, RPARPAR, to deliver the transcription factor SOX2 to retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. We demonstrated that RPE cells can be directly reprogrammed to a neuronal fate by introduction of SOX2. Resulting neuronal cells expressed neuronal marker mRNAs and proteins and downregulated expression of RPE markers. Cells produced extensive neurites and developed synaptic machinery capable of dye uptake after depolarization with potassium. The RPARPAR-mediated delivery of SOX2 alone was sufficient to allow cell lineage reprogramming of both fetal and stem cell-derived RPE cells to become functional neurons.
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Breast-fed and bottle-fed infant rhesus macaques develop distinct gut microbiotas and immune systems.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 09-05-2014
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Diet has a strong influence on the intestinal microbiota in both humans and animal models. It is well established that microbial colonization is required for normal development of the immune system and that specific microbial constituents prompt the differentiation or expansion of certain immune cell subsets. Nonetheless, it has been unclear how profoundly diet might shape the primate immune system or how durable the influence might be. We show that breast-fed and bottle-fed infant rhesus macaques develop markedly different immune systems, which remain different 6 months after weaning when the animals begin receiving identical diets. In particular, breast-fed infants develop robust populations of memory T cells as well as T helper 17 (TH17) cells within the memory pool, whereas bottle-fed infants do not. These findings may partly explain the variation in human susceptibility to conditions with an immune basis, as well as the variable protection against certain infectious diseases.
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Interactive Hangman teaches amino acid structures and abbreviations.
Biochem Mol Biol Educ
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2014
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We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in "amino acid sentences" for the students to translate. Students were required to draw the structure of the corresponding letter they wished to guess on a whiteboard. Each student received a reference sheet of the structures and abbreviations, but was required to draw from memory when guessing a letter. Preassessments and postassessments revealed a drastic improvement in the students' ability to recognize and draw structures from memory. This activity provides a fun, educational game to play in biochemistry discussion sections or during long incubations in biochemistry laboratories. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 42(6):495-500, 2014.
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The genetic prehistory of the New World Arctic.
Science
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2014
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The New World Arctic, the last region of the Americas to be populated by humans, has a relatively well-researched archaeology, but an understanding of its genetic history is lacking. We present genome-wide sequence data from ancient and present-day humans from Greenland, Arctic Canada, Alaska, Aleutian Islands, and Siberia. We show that Paleo-Eskimos (~3000 BCE to 1300 CE) represent a migration pulse into the Americas independent of both Native American and Inuit expansions. Furthermore, the genetic continuity characterizing the Paleo-Eskimo period was interrupted by the arrival of a new population, representing the ancestors of present-day Inuit, with evidence of past gene flow between these lineages. Despite periodic abandonment of major Arctic regions, a single Paleo-Eskimo metapopulation likely survived in near-isolation for more than 4000 years, only to vanish around 700 years ago.
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Predicting postsurgery nasal physiology with computational modeling: current challenges and limitations.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2014
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High failure rates for surgical treatment of nasal airway obstruction (NAO) indicate that better diagnostic tools are needed to improve surgical planning. This study evaluates whether computer models based on a surgeon's edits of presurgery scans can accurately predict results from computer models based on postoperative scans of the same patient using computational fluid dynamics.
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Alternative method of allelic discrimination.
BioTechniques
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2014
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5' nuclease assays for allelic discrimination use both a wild-type and a mutant probe. Here we present a new method for genotyping by 5' nuclease assays that dispenses with the mutant probe, using the wild-type probe together with a probe for a reference gene known to be present in two copies to determine the copy number of the wild type allele relative to the reference gene. The copy number of the wild-type allele then determines the genotype: two copies indicates homozygous wild-type; one copy indicates heterozygous; and zero copies indicates homozygous mutant. We were able to use our method to correctly genotype three alleles of the thiopurine methyl transferase (TPMT) gene: TPMT *2 (c.G238C), *3B (c.G460A) and *3C (c.A719G). Our approach can be used as an alternate allelic discrimination strategy that is cost effective when multiple TaqMan assays are performed on a sample.
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ROCK Inhibition Extends Passage of Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelium.
Stem Cells Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2014
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Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) offer a potentially unlimited supply of cells for emerging cell-based therapies. Unfortunately, the process of deriving distinct cell types can be time consuming and expensive. In the developed world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, with more than 7.2 million people afflicted in the U.S. alone. Both hESC-derived retinal pigmented epithelium (hESC-RPE) and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPE (iPSC-RPE) are being developed for AMD therapies by multiple groups, but their potential for expansion in culture is limited. To attempt to overcome this passage limitation, we examined the involvement of Rho-associated, coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK) in hESC-RPE and iPSC-RPE culture. We report that inhibiting ROCK1/2 with Y-27632 allows extended passage of hESC-RPE and iPSC-RPE. Microarray analysis suggests that ROCK inhibition could be suppressing an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition through various pathways. These include inhibition of key ligands of the transforming growth factor-? pathway (TGFB1 and GDF6) and Wnt signaling. Two important processes are affected, allowing for an increase in hESC-RPE expansion. First, ROCK inhibition promotes proliferation by inducing multiple components that are involved in cell cycle progression. Second, ROCK inhibition affects many pathways that could be converging to suppress RPE-to-mesenchymal transition. This allows hESC-RPE to remain functional for an extended but finite period in culture.
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Characterization of postoperative changes in nasal airflow using a cadaveric computational fluid dynamics model: supporting the internal nasal valve.
JAMA Facial Plast Surg
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2014
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Collapse or compromise of the internal nasal valve (INV) results in symptomatic nasal obstruction; thus, various surgical maneuvers are designed to support the INV.
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Lhx1 maintains synchrony among circadian oscillator neurons of the SCN.
Elife
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2014
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The robustness and limited plasticity of the master circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is attributed to strong intercellular communication among its constituent neurons. However, factors that specify this characteristic feature of the SCN are unknown. Here, we identified Lhx1 as a regulator of SCN coupling. A phase-shifting light pulse causes acute reduction in Lhx1 expression and of its target genes that participate in SCN coupling. Mice lacking Lhx1 in the SCN have intact circadian oscillators, but reduced levels of coupling factors. Consequently, the mice rapidly phase shift under a jet lag paradigm and their behavior rhythms gradually deteriorate under constant condition. Ex vivo recordings of the SCN from these mice showed rapid desynchronization of unit oscillators. Therefore, by regulating expression of genes mediating intercellular communication, Lhx1 imparts synchrony among SCN neurons and ensures consolidated rhythms of activity and rest that is resistant to photic noise.
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Toward a unified model of passive drug permeation II: the physiochemical determinants of unbound tissue distribution with applications to the design of hepatoselective glucokinase activators.
Drug Metab. Dispos.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2014
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In this work, we leverage a mathematical model of the underlying physiochemical properties of tissues and physicochemical properties of molecules to support the development of hepatoselective glucokinase activators. Passive distribution is modeled via a Fick-Nernst-Planck approach, using in vitro experimental data to estimate the permeability of both ionized and neutral species. The model accounts for pH and electrochemical potential across cellular membranes, ionization according to Henderson-Hasselbalch, passive permeation of the neutral species using Fick's law, and passive permeation of the ionized species using the Nernst-Planck equation. The mathematical model of the physiochemical system allows derivation of a single set of parameters governing the distribution of drug molecules across multiple conditions both in vitro and in vivo. A case study using this approach in the development of hepatoselective glucokinase activators via organic anion-transporting polypeptide-mediated hepatic uptake and impaired passive distribution to the pancreas is described. The results for these molecules indicate the permeability penalty of the ionized form is offset by its relative abundance, leading to passive pancreatic exclusion according to the Nernst-Planck extension of Fickian passive permeation. Generally, this model serves as a useful construct for drug discovery scientists to understand subcellular exposure of acids or bases using specific physiochemical properties.
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The Effects of "Grunting" on Serve and Forehand Velocity in Collegiate Tennis Players.
J Strength Cond Res
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2014
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To examine the effects of grunting on velocity and force production during dynamic and static tennis strokes in collegiate tennis players. Thirty-two (16 M and 16 F) Division II and III collegiate tennis athletes with a mean age of 20.2 ± 1.89 years participated as subjects. Demographic and survey data were obtained prior to subjects completing a 10-15 minute warm-up of serves and ground strokes while grunting and not grunting. Subjects performed randomized sets (3 grunting and 3 non-grunting trials) of serves and forehand strokes both dynamically and isometrically. Stroke velocities and isometric forces were measured with a calibrated radar gun and calibrated dynamometer, respectively. EMG data from subjects' dominant pectoralis major and contralateral external oblique muscles were recorded and averaged for data analysis. A repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (RM-MANOVA) compared dynamic stroke velocity, isometric muscle force, and peak EMG activity during each breathing condition at the 0.05 alpha level. The RMANOVA indicated that dynamic velocity and isometric force of both serves and forehand strokes were significantly greater when subjects grunted (F=46.572, p<0.001, power=1.00). Peak muscle activity in the external oblique and pectoralis major muscles was also greater when grunting during both types of strokes (F=3.867, p=0.05, power=0.950). Grunt history, gender, perceived advantages and disadvantages of grunting, years of experience, highest level of competition, and order of testing did not significantly alter any of these results. The velocity, force, and peak muscle activity during tennis serves and forehand strokes are significantly enhanced when athletes are allowed to grunt.
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A single slide multiplex assay for the evaluation of classical Hodgkin lymphoma.
Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2014
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Classical Hodgkin lymphoma can be diagnosed with confidence in the majority of cases, but there is a significant subset that remains a diagnostic challenge. The authors have investigated the utility of a novel hyperplexing technology, MultiOmyx™, which may be applied to stain with >60 antibodies on single tissue sections from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue as an aid to the diagnosis of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. The multiplexing protocol included CD30, CD15, PAX-5, CD20, CD79a, CD45, BOB.1, OCT-2, and CD3 antibodies. The technology showed a high degree of sensitivity, specificity, and precision. Comparison studies with routine hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical assessment of hematopathology cases in which classical Hodgkin lymphoma was included in the differential diagnosis showed concordance in 54 of 56 cases, with the 2 discordant cases illustrating the potential of this multiplexed immunofluorescence technology to improve on traditional immunohistochemistry for classical Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis. This technology is practical for routine diagnosis and may be particularly useful in cases in which the sample size is limited, few Hodgkin-like cells are present, or in CD30-positive lymphoma cases with difficult morphology. MultiOmyx may potentially benefit other areas of research and diagnostic pathology.
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Multiple EphB receptors mediate dorsal-ventral retinotopic mapping via similar bi-functional responses to ephrin-B1.
Mol. Cell. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2014
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The projection from the retina to the superior colliculus in mice is organized in a retinotopic map that develops through the formation and guidance of interstitial branches extended by retinal ganglion cell axons. Bidirectional branch guidance along the lateral-medial collicular axis is critical to mapping the dorsal-ventral retinal axis. EphB receptor tyrosine kinases expressed in an overall low to high dorsal-ventral retinal gradient have been implicated in this mapping in response to the graded low to high lateral-medial expression of a ligand, ephrin-B1, in the superior colliculus. However, the relative contributions of EphBs and ephrin-B1 are not well understood. We examined EphB1, EphB2, and EphB3 mutant mice and find that each has ectopic arborizations of retinal axon branches lateral to their appropriate termination zone, with no qualitative differences in aberrant mapping, suggesting a similar role for each EphB. However, the frequency of cases with map defects progressively rises in compound EphB mutants coincident with the number of EphB null alleles from one to five of the six total alleles indicating that EphB level is critical. We analyzed branch extension in vitro and find that dorsal branches, with low EphB levels, exhibit a negative response to ephrin-B1, whereas ventral branches, with high EphB levels, exhibit a positive response to ephrin-B1. Using EphB mutant retina, we show that both of these differential branch extension responses are dependent on EphB level. Our findings show a bifunctional action of ephrin-B1 regulated by EphB levels that can account for the bidirectional extension of interstitial branches required to establish a retinotopic map.
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Evolution of Terminology for Human-Papillomavirus-Infection-Related Vulvar Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions.
J Low Genit Tract Dis
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2014
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The aim of this study was to review the nearly 100-year evolution of terminology applicable to oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV)-related vulvar intraepithelial squamous lesions and present current consensus terminology.
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Genetic analysis reveals that amyloid precursor protein and death receptor 6 function in the same pathway to control axonal pruning independent of ?-secretase.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2014
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In the developing brain, initial neuronal projections are formed through extensive growth and branching of developing axons, but many branches are later pruned to sculpt the mature pattern of connections. Despite its widespread occurrence, the mechanisms controlling pruning remain incompletely characterized. Based on pharmacological and biochemical analysis in vitro and initial genetic analysis in vivo, prior studies implicated a pathway involving binding of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) to Death Receptor 6 (DR6) and activation of a downstream caspase cascade in axonal pruning. Here, we further test their involvement in pruning in vivo and their mechanism of action through extensive genetic and biochemical analysis. Genetic deletion of DR6 was previously shown to impair pruning of retinal axons in vivo. We show that genetic deletion of APP similarly impairs pruning of retinal axons in vivo and provide evidence that APP and DR6 act cell autonomously and in the same pathway to control pruning. Prior analysis had suggested that ?-secretase cleavage of APP and binding of an N-terminal fragment of APP to DR6 is required for their actions, but further genetic and biochemical analysis reveals that ?-secretase activity is not required and that high-affinity binding to DR6 requires a more C-terminal portion of the APP ectodomain. These results provide direct support for the model that APP and DR6 function cell autonomously and in the same pathway to control pruning in vivo and raise the possibility of alternate mechanisms for how APP and DR6 control pruning.
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A CLN8 nonsense mutation in the whole genome sequence of a mixed breed dog with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and Australian Shepherd ancestry.
Mol. Genet. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2014
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The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are hereditary neurodegenerative diseases characterized by seizures and progressive cognitive decline, motor impairment, and vision loss accompanied by accumulation of autofluorescent lysosomal storage bodies in the central nervous system and elsewhere in the body. Mutations in at least 14 genes underlie the various forms of NCL. One of these genes, CLN8, encodes an intrinsic membrane protein of unknown function that appears to be localized primarily to the endoplasmic reticulum. Most CLN8 mutations in people result in a form of NCL with a late infantile onset and relatively rapid progression. A mixed breed dog with Australian Shepherd and Blue Heeler ancestry developed neurological signs characteristic of NCL starting at about 8months of age. The signs became progressively worse and the dog was euthanized at 21months of age due to seizures of increasing frequency and severity. Postmortem examination of the brain and retinas identified massive accumulations of intracellular autofluorescent inclusions characteristic of the NCLs. Whole genome sequencing of DNA from this dog identified a CLN8:c.585G>A transition that predicts a CLN8:p.Trp195* nonsense mutation. This mutation appears to be rare in both ancestral breeds. All of our 133 archived DNA samples from Blue Heelers, and 1481 of our 1488 archived Australian Shepherd DNA samples tested homozygous for the reference CLN8:c.585G allele. Four of the Australian Shepherd samples tested heterozygous and 3 tested homozygous for the mutant CLN8:c.585A allele. All 3 dogs homozygous for the A allele exhibited clinical signs of NCL and in 2 of them NCL was confirmed by postmortem evaluation of brain tissue. The occurrence of confirmed NCL in 3 of 4 CLN8:c.585A homozygous dogs, plus the occurrence of clinical signs consistent with NCL in the fourth homozygote strongly suggests that this rare truncating mutation causes NCL. Identification of this NCL-causing mutation provides the opportunity for identifying dogs that can be used to establish a canine model for the CLN8 disease (also known as late infantile variant or late infantile CLN8 disease).
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Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into retinal pigmented epithelium.
Dev Ophthalmol
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2014
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Ocular diseases affect millions worldwide and dramatically influence the quality of life. Although much is known about ocular biology and disease pathologies, effective treatments are still lacking. The eye is well suited for application of emerging cell-based therapies. This chapter explores the development of stem cell-based treatments for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a prevalent ocular disease in the elderly. Retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), a cell type implicated in AMD, has been derived from both induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells (ESC). Rapidly advancing research has generated various methods of RPE differentiation and several transplantation strategies. Clinical trials are already underway using suspensions of ESC-derived RPE and others are soon to follow. This chapter will provide an overview of current derivation and transplantation strategies for stem cell-derived RPE for the treatment of AMD and other related ocular diseases.
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Standardization in patient safety: the WHO High 5s project.
Int J Qual Health Care
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2014
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Despite its success in other industries, process standardization in health care has been slow to gain traction or to demonstrate a positive impact on the safety of care.
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Fretting and corrosion in modular-neck total hip arthroplasty femoral stems.
J Bone Joint Surg Am
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2014
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During total hip arthroplasty, use of a modular femoral neck on a stemmed implant allows optimization of neck anteversion, length, and offset, resulting in more accurate balance. We performed a retrospective analysis of a consecutive cohort of patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty with a modular-neck hip system with ceramic-on-ceramic bearings.
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Role of BRCA1 in brain development.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2014
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Breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) is a breast and ovarian cancer tumor suppressor whose loss leads to DNA damage and defective centrosome functions. Despite its tumor suppression functions, BRCA1 is most highly expressed in the embryonic neuroepithelium when the neural progenitors are highly proliferative. To determine its functional significance, we deleted BRCA1 in the developing brain using a neural progenitor-specific driver. The phenotype is characterized by severe agenesis of multiple laminated cerebral structures affecting most notably the neocortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and olfactory bulbs. Major phenotypes are caused by excess apoptosis, as these could be significantly suppressed by the concomitant deletion of p53. Certain phenotypes attributable to centrosomal and cell polarity functions could not be rescued by p53 deletion. A double KO with the DNA damage sensor kinase ATM was able to rescue BRCA1 loss to a greater extent than p53. Our results suggest distinct apoptotic and centrosomal functions of BRCA1 in neural progenitors, with important implications to understand the sensitivity of the embryonic brain to DNA damage, as well as the developmental regulation of brain size.
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Patient involvement in outcome measures for psoriatic arthritis.
Curr Rheumatol Rep
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2014
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Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous inflammatory arthritis with a varied clinical phenotype. There has been considerable international collaboration over recent years to develop and prioritise appropriate disease domains and outcome measures to capture all aspects of this complex disease. It has been recognised that patient-reported measures and physician assessments are complementary and, when used together, allow an improved reflection of disease burden. Taking this concept one step further, the experience in rheumatoid arthritis has demonstrated benefits of incorporating the patient perspective in the development of outcome measures. We report a systematic review demonstrating (1) that there has been little incorporation of the patient perspective in the development of outcome measures and domains in PsA, (2) the proceedings from the preliminary patient involvement in outcome measures for PsA (PIOMPSA) meetings, and (3) a proposed roadmap for improving patient involvement.
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p53 expression is a strong marker of inferior survival in de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and may have enhanced negative effect with MYC coexpression: a single institutional clinicopathologic study.
Am. J. Clin. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2014
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To examine interactions among clinical factors and pathologic biomarkers in predicting the outcome of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with rituximab-based immunochemotherapy.
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The recognition and classification of lymphoproliferative disorders of the gut.
Hum. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2014
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Gastrointestinal lymphomas can be difficult to diagnose, particularly in small samples, when early in development, or when of unusual types. In this review, we describe lymphoid proliferations in the gastrointestinal tract in a location-based manner, including, mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and large bowel. For the purpose of differential diagnosis, benign mimics of lymphoma are also described. Lymphoma types that are specifically addressed include plasmablastic, extranodal natural killer/T-cell-nasal type, extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (eg, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma), diffuse large B cell, primary follicular of small intestine, enteropathy-associated T cell, and Burkitt and mantle cell. Immunohistochemical markers useful in the diagnostic approach are elaborated in detail.
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A systematic review of patient-reported nasal obstruction scores: defining normative and symptomatic ranges in surgical patients.
JAMA Facial Plast Surg
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2014
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IMPORTANCE A gold standard objective measure of nasal airway obstruction (NAO) does not currently exist, so patient-reported measures are commonly used, particularly the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scale and the visual analog scale (VAS). However, questions remain regarding how best to use these instruments. OBJECTIVES To systematically review studies on NOSE and VAS scores in patients with NAO and to compile and standardize the data to (1) define symptomatic and normative values for presurgical and postsurgical patients with NAO, asymptomatic individuals, and the general population; (2) determine if postsurgical scores are comparable with asymptomatic scores; and (3) determine if there is a clinically useful preoperative and postoperative score change. EVIDENCE REVIEW A systematic review of the literature was performed through PubMed for studies assessing NOSE and VAS scores in patients with chronic NAO. Strict inclusion criteria were applied to focus on anatomic obstruction only. For statistical analysis, the patients were classified as asymptomatic, presurgical and postsurgical with NAO, and the general population. FINDINGS The mean (SD) NOSE and VAS scores for a patient with NAO were 65 (22) and 6.9 (2.3), respectively. The mean postsurgical NOSE and VAS scores were 23 (20) and 2.1 (2.2), respectively. The mean asymptomatic individual NOSE and VAS scores were 15 (17) and 2.1 (1.6). The mean NOSE and VAS scores for the general population were 42 (27) and 4.6 (2.6), respectively. The mean presurgical to postsurgical change was more than 40 for NOSE scores and more than 4.0 for VAS scores. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE We have shown that normative and abnormal value ranges for NOSE and VAS can be established for clinical use. Given the consistency of both scales, we conclude that these measures can be used as a clinically meaningful measure of successful surgical outcomes.
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Extramedullary acute leukemia developing in a pre-existing osteoma cutis.
J. Cutan. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2014
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Primary osteoma cutis (cutaneous ossification) is an uncommon disease in which there is bone formation within the skin in the absence of a demonstrable pre-existing condition. Osteoma cutis is a chronic and benign condition. We report a case of a 45-year-old man who developed extramedullary acute leukemia with a myeloid immunophenotype (myeloid sarcoma) with its initial presentation within an isolated pre-existing osteoma cutis in the post-auricular scalp without evidence of systemic acute leukemia or chronic myeloid stem cell disorders. The tumor was surgically excised without complications. Four months later, acute leukemia recurred in the contralateral posterior mandible and showed an immunophenotype consistent with acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. The patient now has been treated by standard protocols for acute leukemia. The diagnosis of an extramedullary acute leukemia is challenging because of its inconsistent clinical and histopathologic presentations. Extramedullary acute leukemia developing in a pre-existing osteoma cutis is very unusual and has not been previously reported in the literature.
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Epstein-Barr virus-positive nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma.
Ann Diagn Pathol
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2014
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Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is classified into 2 largely distinct subgroups, namely nodular lymphocyte predominant HL (NLPHL) and classic HL (CHL). CHL is further divided into nodular sclerosis, lymphocyte-rich, mixed cellularity (MCCHL) and lymphocyte-depleted (LDCHL) subtypes. In industrialized nations, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with all types of CHL, especially the MCCHL and LDCHL subtypes, but is rare in NLPHL. We report 8 cases of EBV-positive NLPHL occurring in patients in the United States. All 8 patients have no history of immunosuppression and presented with localized or systemic lymphadenopathy. Histologically, 6 cases had a vaguely nodular pattern and 2 cases had a nodular and diffuse pattern. In all cases, lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells were observed in a background of small lymphocytes and histiocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the LP cells in all cases were positive for CD20, CD79a, PAX5, OCT2, and CD45 and were negative for CD15. CD30 was expressed variably in 7 cases. EBV encoded RNA was present in all LP cells in 5 cases and in a subset of LP cells in 3 cases. One patient was treated with radiation therapy and 7 patients received chemotherapy, including 4 of 7 patients who underwent autologous stem cell transplantation. EBV infection is a rare primary or secondary event in NLPHL that correlates with poorer prognosis and often requires more aggressive therapy. The variable expression of CD30 in most of these cases could be the result of EBV infection.
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Cancer incidence in Ghana, 2012: evidence from a population-based cancer registry.
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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Data on cancers is a challenge in most developing countries. Population-based cancer registries are also not common in developing countries despite the usefulness of such registries in informing cancer prevention and control programmes. The availability of population-based data on cancers in Africa varies across different countries. In Ghana, data and research on cancer have focussed on specific cancers and have been hospital-based with no reference population. The Kumasi Cancer Registry was established as the first population-based cancer registry in Ghana in 2012 to provide information on cancer cases seen in the city of Kumasi.
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Canine hereditary ataxia in old english sheepdogs and gordon setters is associated with a defect in the autophagy gene encoding RAB24.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters suffer from a juvenile onset, autosomal recessive form of canine hereditary ataxia primarily affecting the Purkinje neuron of the cerebellar cortex. The clinical and histological characteristics are analogous to hereditary ataxias in humans. Linkage and genome-wide association studies on a cohort of related Old English Sheepdogs identified a region on CFA4 strongly associated with the disease phenotype. Targeted sequence capture and next generation sequencing of the region identified an A to C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located at position 113 in exon 1 of an autophagy gene, RAB24, that segregated with the phenotype. Genotyping of six additional breeds of dogs affected with hereditary ataxia identified the same polymorphism in affected Gordon Setters that segregated perfectly with phenotype. The other breeds tested did not have the polymorphism. Genome-wide SNP genotyping of Gordon Setters identified a 1.9 MB region with an identical haplotype to affected Old English Sheepdogs. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural evaluation of the brains of affected dogs from both breeds identified dramatic Purkinje neuron loss with axonal spheroids, accumulation of autophagosomes, ubiquitin positive inclusions and a diffuse increase in cytoplasmic neuronal ubiquitin staining. These findings recapitulate the changes reported in mice with induced neuron-specific autophagy defects. Taken together, our results suggest that a defect in RAB24, a gene associated with autophagy, is highly associated with and may contribute to canine hereditary ataxia in Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters. This finding suggests that detailed investigation of autophagy pathways should be undertaken in human hereditary ataxia.
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Evaluation of a novel series of fluorine-18-labeled imidazobenzodiazepines as potential new positron emission tomography radioligands for the GABAA receptor.
Nucl. Med. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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[(11)C]Flumazenil has been used to study the GABAA receptor in many preclinical and clinical studies, but the short half-life of carbon-11 means that this molecule is restricted to use by investigators with access to on-site cyclotron and radiosynthesis facilities. The radiosynthesis of [(18)F]flumazenil has been evaluated by several groups, but the radiochemical yield can be low and inconsistent. We previously reported a series of fluorine-18-labeled imidazobenzodiazepine-based ligands for the GABAA receptor, which had significantly improved radiosynthesis yields. Here we report the in vivo evaluation and comparison of the distribution, metabolism and specificity of the novel ligands in comparison with [(18)F]flumazenil.
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Prevalence and clinical implications of cyclin D1 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with immunochemotherapy: a report from the International DLBCL Rituximab-CHOP Consortium Program.
Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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Cyclin D1 expression has been reported in a subset of patients with diffuse large B-cell leukemia (DLBCL), but studies have been few and generally small, and they have demonstrated no obvious clinical implications attributable to cyclin D1 expression.
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The EHV-1 UL4 protein that tempers viral gene expression interacts with cellular transcription factors.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
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The UL4 gene is conserved within the genome of defective interfering particles of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) that mediate persistent infection. Here, we show that the UL4 protein inhibits EHV-1 reporter gene expression by decreasing the level of transcribed mRNA. The UL4 protein did not bind any gene class of EHV-1 promoters in electromobility or chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, but directly interacted with the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II both in vitro (GST-pulldown assays) and in infected cells (coimmunoprecipitation analyses). Microarray analyses of the expression of the 78 EHV-1 genes revealed that viral late genes important for virion assembly displayed enhanced expression in cells infected with UL4-null virus as compared to wild-type or UL4-restored EHV-1. Quantitative PCR analyses showed that viral DNA replication was not retarded in cells infected with the UL4-null virus as compared to wild-type EHV-1.
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A Novel Mutation in CLCN1 Associated with Feline Myotonia Congenita.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Myotonia congenita (MC) is a skeletal muscle channelopathy characterized by inability of the muscle to relax following voluntary contraction. Worldwide population prevalence in humans is 1?100,000. Studies in mice, dogs, humans and goats confirmed myotonia associated with functional defects in chloride channels and mutations in a skeletal muscle chloride channel (CLCN1). CLCN1 encodes for the most abundant chloride channel in the skeletal muscle cell membrane. Five random bred cats from Winnipeg, Canada with MC were examined. All cats had a protruding tongue, limited range of jaw motion and drooling with prominent neck and proximal limb musculature. All cats had blepharospasm upon palpebral reflex testing and a short-strided gait. Electromyograms demonstrated myotonic discharges at a mean frequency of 300 Hz resembling the sound of a 'swarm of bees'. Muscle histopathology showed hypertrophy of all fiber types. Direct sequencing of CLCN1 revealed a mutation disrupting a donor splice site downstream of exon 16 in only the affected cats. In vitro translation of the mutated protein predicted a premature truncation and partial lack of the highly conserved CBS1 (cystathionine ?-synthase) domain critical for ion transport activity and one dimerization domain pivotal in channel formation. Genetic screening of the Winnipeg random bred population of the cats' origin identified carriers of the mutation. A genetic test for population screening is now available and carrier cats from the feral population can be identified.
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1,5-Anhydroglucitol in saliva is a noninvasive marker of short-term glycemic control.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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In most ethnicities at least a quarter of all cases with diabetes is assumed to be undiagnosed. Screening for diabetes using saliva has been suggested as an effective approach to identify affected individuals.
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Monocyte activation by interferon-? is associated with failure to achieve a sustained virologic response after treatment for hepatitis C virus infection.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 12-10-2013
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Background.?Interferon-alpha (IFN-?) and ribavirin can induce a sustained virologic response (SVR) in some but not all hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. The mechanism of effective treatment is unclear. One possibility is that IFN-? differentially improves the functional capacity of classic myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) by altering expression of surface molecules or cytokines. Others have proposed that antigen-presenting cell activation could be paradoxically detrimental in HCV due to the production by monocytes of substances inhibitory or toxic to plasmacytoid dendritic cells.Methods.?We examined responses to in vitro IFN-? treatment of peripheral blood leukocyte samples from a retrospective treatment cohort of nearly 200 HCV-seropositive patients who had undergone antiviral therapy with ribavirin and peginterferon. We analyzed the variable responses of antigen-presenting cell subsets to drug.Results.?We found that patients achieving SVR were no more likely to have robust mDC activation in response to IFN-? than those who failed to achieve SVR. Rather, patients achieving SVR were distinguished by restrained monocyte activation in the presence of IFN-?, a factor that was second in importance only to IL28B genotype in its association with SVR.Conclusions.?These results suggest that inter-individual variability in the response of monocytes to IFN-? is an important determinant of treatment success with IFN-?-based regimens.
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Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma: Long-Term Follow-Up of 60 Patients.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 12-09-2013
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Breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a recently described clinicopathologic entity that usually presents as an effusion-associated fibrous capsule surrounding an implant. Less frequently, it presents as a mass. The natural history of this disease and long-term outcomes are unknown.
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Perception of better nasal patency correlates with increased mucosal cooling after surgery for nasal obstruction.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
PUBLISHED: 10-23-2013
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Objectives To (1) quantify mucosal cooling (ie, heat loss) spatially in the nasal passages of nasal airway obstruction (NAO) patients before and after surgery using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and (2) correlate mucosal cooling with patient-reported symptoms, as measured by the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) and a visual analog scale (VAS) for sensation of nasal airflow. Study Design Prospective. Setting Academic tertiary medical center. Subjects and Methods Computed tomography (CT) scans and NOSE and VAS surveys were obtained from 10 patients before and after surgery to relieve NAO. Three-dimensional models of each patients nasal anatomy were used to run steady-state CFD simulations of airflow and heat transfer during inspiration. Heat loss across the nasal vestibule and the entire nasal cavity, as well as the surface area of mucosa exposed to heat fluxes >50 W/m(2), were compared pre- and postoperatively. Results After surgery, heat loss increased significantly on the preoperative most obstructed side (P < .0002). A larger surface area of nasal mucosa was exposed to heat fluxes >50 W/m(2) after surgery. The best correlation between patient-reported and CFD measures of nasal patency was obtained for NOSE against surface area in which heat fluxes were >50 W/m(2) (Pearson r = -0.76). Conclusion A significant postoperative increase in mucosal cooling correlates well with patients perception of better nasal patency after NAO surgery. Computational fluid dynamics-derived heat fluxes may prove to be a valuable predictor of success in NAO surgery.
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The genetics of interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma share some changes with Langerhans cell histiocytosis in select cases.
Ann Diagn Pathol
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2013
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Histiocytic disorders have been noted to have evidence of transdifferentiation; examples of cases with combinations of different lineages have been shown. In our index case, we identified interdigitating dendritic cell (IDC) differentiation in a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Little is currently known about the genetics of IDC sarcoma (IDCS) because they are exceedingly rare. Using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we evaluated 4 cases of IDCS and compared them with our index case, as well as genetic abnormalities previously found in LCH. Four cases of paraffin-embedded samples of IDCS and 1 case of LCH with IDC differentiation were evaluated using aCGH. Array CGH results showed no abnormalities in a case of LCH with interdigitating cell differentiation. In 3 of 4 cases of IDCS, genetic abnormalities were identified; 1 case had no identifiable abnormalities. Interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma case 1 had gains of 3q and 13q; IDCS case 2 had trisomy 12; IDCS case 3 had deletions of 7p, 12p, 16p, 18q, 19q, and 22q; and IDCS case 4 had no detectable abnormalities. Our index case, LCH with IDC differentiation, showed no abnormalities by aCGH. A number of LCH cases do not have detectable genetic abnormalities. In contrast, 3 of 4 cases of IDCS evaluated had identifiable abnormalities by aCGH. Furthermore, 2 of these shared abnormalities, albeit of large genetic regions, with published abnormalities seen in LCH. No recurrent abnormalities were identified in the IDCS cases. However, the possibility of a relationship between IDCS and LCH cannot be entirely excluded by these results.
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Abnormal expression of CD20 on IgG4 plasma cells associated with IgG4-related lymphadenopathy.
Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2013
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Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease is a recently described entity that presents as mass-forming lesions in soft tissue, exocrine glands, and in lymph nodes as IgG4-related lymphadenopathy. The underlying pathologic mechanism of IgG4-related disease is unclear; however, rituximab (an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) has been shown to have clinical efficacy.
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Written feedback and continuity of learning in a geographically distributed medical education program.
Med Teach
PUBLISHED: 08-23-2013
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The provision of effective feedback on clinical performance for medical students is important for their continued learning. Written feedback is an underutilised medium for linking clinical performances over time.
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In Vivo expression of a light-activatable potassium channel using unnatural amino acids.
Neuron
PUBLISHED: 08-09-2013
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Optical control of protein function provides excellent spatial-temporal resolution for studying proteins in situ. Although light-sensitive exogenous proteins and ligands have been used to manipulate neuronal activity, a method for optical control of neuronal proteins using unnatural amino acids (Uaa) in vivo is lacking. Here, we describe the genetic incorporation of a photoreactive Uaa into the pore of an inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir2.1. The Uaa occluded the pore, rendering the channel nonconducting, and, on brief light illumination, was released to permit outward K(+) current. Expression of this photoinducible inwardly rectifying potassium (PIRK) channel in rat hippocampal neurons created a light-activatable PIRK switch for suppressing neuronal firing. We also expanded the genetic code of mammals to express PIRK channels in embryonic mouse neocortex in vivo and demonstrated a light-activated PIRK current in cortical neurons. These principles could be generally expanded to other proteins expressed in the brain to enable optical regulation.
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Geniculocortical input drives genetic distinctions between primary and higher-order visual areas.
Science
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2013
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Studies of area patterning of the neocortex have focused on primary areas, concluding that the primary visual area, V1, is specified by transcription factors (TFs) expressed by progenitors. Mechanisms that determine higher-order visual areas (V(HO)) and distinguish them from V1 are unknown. We demonstrated a requirement for thalamocortical axon (TCA) input by genetically deleting geniculocortical TCAs and showed that they drive differentiation of patterned gene expression that distinguishes V1 and V(HO). Our findings suggest a multistage process for area patterning: TFs expressed by progenitors specify an occipital visual cortical field that differentiates into V1 and V(HO); this latter phase requires geniculocortical TCA input to the nascent V1 that determines genetic distinctions between V1 and V(HO) for all layers and ultimately determines their area-specific functional properties.
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Sensory cortex limits cortical maps and drives top-down plasticity in thalamocortical circuits.
Nat. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2013
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The primary somatosensory cortex (S1) contains a complete body map that mirrors the subcortical maps developed by peripheral sensory input projecting to the sensory hindbrain, the thalamus and then S1. Peripheral changes during development alter these maps through bottom-up plasticity. Unknown is how S1 size influences map organization and whether an altered S1 map feeds back to affect subcortical maps. We show that the size of S1 in mice is significantly reduced by cortex-specific deletion of Pax6, resulting in a reduced body map and loss of body representations by an exclusion of later-differentiating sensory thalamocortical input. An initially normal sensory thalamus was repatterned to match the aberrant S1 map by apoptotic deletion of thalamic neurons representing body parts with axons excluded from S1. Deleted representations were rescued by altering competition between thalamocortical axons using sensory deprivation or increasing the size of S1. Thus, S1 size determined the resolution and completeness of body maps and engaged top-down plasticity that repatterned the sensory thalamus to match S1.
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Quantification of airflow into the maxillary sinuses before and after functional endoscopic sinus surgery.
Int Forum Allergy Rhinol
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2013
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The effects of increases in maxillary sinus (MS) airflow following functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) are unknown. The goal of this study was to quantify the effects of FESS on airflow into the MS in a cohort of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis, and compare MS flow rate with patient-reported outcome measures.
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Towards a unified model of passive drug permeation I: Origins of the unstirred water layer with applications to ionic permeation.
Eur J Pharm Sci
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2013
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In this work, we provide a unified theoretical framework describing how drug molecules can permeate across membranes in neutral and ionized forms for unstirred in vitro systems. The analysis provides a self-consistent basis for the origin of the unstirred water layer (UWL) within the Nernst-Planck framework in the fully unstirred limit and further provides an accounting mechanism based simply on the bulk aqueous solvent diffusion constant of the drug molecule. Our framework makes no new assumptions about the underlying physics of molecular permeation. We hold simply that Nernst-Planck is a reasonable approximation at low concentrations and all physical systems must conserve mass. The applicability of the derived framework has been examined both with respect to the effect of stirring and externally applied voltages to measured permeability. The analysis contains data for 9 compounds extracted from the literature representing a range of permeabilities and aqueous diffusion coefficients. Applicability with respect to ionized permeation is examined using literature data for the permanently charged cation, crystal violet, providing a basis for the underlying mechanism for ionized drug permeation for this molecule as being due to mobile counter-current flow.
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IL-7 production in murine lymphatic endothelial cells and induction in the setting of peripheral lymphopenia.
Int. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2013
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IL-7 is a required factor for T-cell homeostasis. Because of low expression levels and poor reagent availability, the cellular sources of IL-7 have proven challenging to characterize. In this study, we describe a reporter mouse in which enhanced GFP is expressed from the endogenous Il7 locus. We show that IL-7 is produced by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) distributed throughout the systemic lymphatic vasculature as well as by fibroblastic reticular cells, and that phosphorylation of STAT5 in lymphocytes is higher in lymphatics than in blood. Furthermore, in nodes depleted of lymphocytes, Il7 transcription is increased in stromal but not in myeloid subsets. These data support recent findings that lymphocyte homeostasis is influenced by access to secondary lymphoid organs and point to LECs as an important in vivo source of IL-7, bathing trafficking immune cells under both resting and lymphopenic conditions.
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Rapid and efficient directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into retinal pigmented epithelium.
Stem Cells Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2013
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Controlling the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells is the goal of many laboratories, both to study normal human development and to generate cells for transplantation. One important cell type under investigation is the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the Western world, is caused by dysfunction and death of the RPE. Currently, RPE derived from human embryonic stem cells are in clinical trials for the treatment of AMD. Although protocols to generate RPE from human pluripotent stem cells have become more efficient since the first report in 2004, they are still time-consuming and relatively inefficient. We have found that the addition of defined factors at specific times leads to conversion of approximately 80% of the cells to an RPE phenotype in only 14 days. This protocol should be useful for rapidly generating RPE for transplantation as well as for studying RPE development in vitro.
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Ethnic and gender differences in advanced glycation end products measured by skin auto-fluorescence.
Dermatoendocrinol
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2013
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Background Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been shown to be a predictor of cardiovascular risk in Caucasian subjects. In this study we examine whether the existing reference values are useable for non-Caucasian ethnicities. Furthermore, we assessed whether gender and smoking affect AGEs. Methods AGEs were determined by a non-invasive method of skin auto-fluorescence (AF). AF was measured in 200 Arabs, 99 South Asians, 35 Filipinos and 14 subjects of other/mixed ethnicity in the Qatar Metabolomics Study on Diabetes (QMDiab). Using multivariate linear regression analysis and adjusting for age and type 2 diabetes, we assessed whether ethnicity, gender and smoking were associated with AF. Results The mean AF was 2.27 arbitrary units (AU) (SD: 0.63). Arabs and Filipinos had a significant higher AF than the South Asian population (0.25 arbitrary units (AU) (95% CI: 0.11?0.39), p = 0.001 and 0.34 (95% CI: 0.13?0.55), p = 0.001 respectively). Also, AF was significantly higher in females (0.41 AU (95% CI: 0.29?0.53), p < 0.001). AF associated with smoking (0.21 AU (95% CI: 0.01?0.41), p = 0.04) and increased with the number of pack-years smoked (p = 0.02). Conclusions This study suggests that the existing reference values should take ethnicity, gender and smoking into account. Larger studies in specific ethnicities are necessary to create ethnic- and gender-specific reference values.
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Reactive lymphadenopathies that mimic lymphoma: entities of unknown etiology.
Semin Diagn Pathol
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2013
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Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease, Kimura disease, Rosai-Dorfman disease and IgG4 related lymphadenopathy may present with enlarging masses clinically mimicking lymphoma. A combination of clinical and histologic findings is necessary to diagnose these important rare entities, which may occasionally have aggressive clinical behavior. The recognition of these disorders is important in order to avoid misdiagnosis of malignancy, other systemic diseases such as systemic lupus, and to institute correct management and therapy, such as steroid treatment for IgG4 related lymphadenopathy. The underlying etiologies of these diseases are not completely clear at present, however, their recognition has become more common as diagnostic techniques improve. Their diagnosis and recognition may help to elucidate their underlying pathobiology.
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Limited slot femorotomy for removal of proximally coated cementless stems. A 10-year follow-up of an unreported surgical technique.
J Arthroplasty
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2013
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We present a technique of single posterior longitudinal slot femorotomy. This technique allows the expansion of the metaphyseal-diaphyseal region of the proximal femur facilitating extraction of proximally coated uncemented femoral components while leaving the metaphysis and diaphysis intact. Since 1996 we have performed this technique in 18 revision total hip arthroplasties in 15 patients who had x-ray appearance of bony in-growth/on-growth and where found to have solidly ingrown stems at revision surgery. All were revised to a metaphyseally fitting uncemented stem. At mean follow-up of 122.4 months, there were significant improvements in both pain and function. All revised stems achieved stable boney fixation. There were no complications due to this technique. No patient developed a limp or thigh pain postoperatively. There have been no re-revisions of the stem. With appropriate patient selection, this is a simple, reliable, and extensile technique is useful to assist in the extraction of uncemented proximally coated femoral components whether hydroxyapatite-coated or not.
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Diarrhea associated with afatinib: an oral ErbB family blocker.
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2013
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Gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events (AEs) are frequently observed in patients receiving EGF receptor (EGFR; also known as HER1 or ErbB1) tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. GI AEs are among the most common and most impactful on a patients quality of life. Severe diarrhea can result in fluid and electrolyte losses, leading to dehydration, electrolyte imbalances and renal insufficiency. Afatinib is an irreversible, oral, ErbB family blocker, inhibiting EGFR (ErbB1), HER2 (ErbB2) and ErbB4 receptor kinases. It also inhibits transphosphorylation of ErbB3. Similar to reversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors of EGFR, GI AEs - in particular, diarrhea - have frequently been observed in afatinib-treated patients. This article summarizes current data on afatinib-associated diarrhea and provides strategies for its management. Patient education, early identification, timely management and ongoing assessment will help to prevent aggravation, afatinib dose reductions or therapy discontinuation, encouraging patient compliance and allowing patients to obtain the maximum therapeutic benefit from this agent.
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Dermatologic adverse events associated with afatinib: an oral ErbB family blocker.
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2013
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Dermatologic adverse events (AEs) are frequently observed in patients receiving EGF receptor (EGFR; also known as ErbB1) tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. The impact of these AEs goes beyond cosmesis to the discomfort from itching, pain and secondary infections, all of which may significantly impact on patient well-being, adherence and clinical outcomes. Afatinib is a potent, irreversible, oral, ErbB family blocker, inhibiting EGFR (ErbB1), HER2 (ErbB2) and ErbB4 receptor kinases. It also inhibits transphosphorylation of ErbB3. Similar to EGFR inhibitors, dermatologic AEs have been frequently observed in patients treated with afatinib. Papulopustular (acneiform) rash, pruritus, xerosis, paronychia and alopecia will require patient education and proactive treatment interventions. This article summarizes current data on the dermatologic AEs associated with afatinib treatment across the clinical trial program, and provides strategies for their effective management.
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CEA, AFP and CA 19-9 analysis in peritoneal fluid to differentiate causes of ascites formation.
Clin. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2013
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Tumor marker analysis in ascites has been proposed as a measure to aid in the diagnosis of malignancy. The objectives of this study were to establish tumor marker cut-offs and determine the diagnostic performance of measuring CEA, CA 19-9 and AFP in ascites for differentiating between non-malignant and malignant etiologies.
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Role for Lhx2 in corticogenesis through regulation of progenitor differentiation.
Mol. Cell. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2013
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The neocortex represents the brain region that has undergone a major increase in its relative size during the course of mammalian evolution. The larger cortex results from a corresponding increase in progenitor cell number. The progenitors giving rise to neocortex are located in the ventricular zone of the dorsal telencephalon and highly express Lhx2, a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor. The neocortex fails to form in the Lhx2 constitutive knockout, indicating a role for Lhx2 in corticogenesis, but mid-embryonic lethality of the Lhx2 knockout requires the use of conditional strategies for further studies. Therefore, to explore Lhx2 function in neocortical progenitors, we generated mice with Lhx2 conditionally deleted from cortical progenitors at the onset of neurogenesis. We find that Lhx2 is critical for maintaining the proliferative state of neocortical progenitors during corticogenesis. In the conditional knockouts, the neocortex is formed but is significantly smaller than wild type. We find that deletion of Lhx2 leads to significantly decreased numbers of cortical progenitors and premature neuronal differentiation. A likely mechanism is indicated by our findings that Lhx2 is required for the expression of Hes1 in cortical progenitors, a key effector in the Notch signaling pathway that maintains the proliferative progenitor state. We conclude that Lhx2 regulates the balance between proliferation and differentiation in cortical progenitors and through this mechanism Lhx2 controls cortical size.
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Stress-induced isoforms of MDM2 and MDM4 correlate with high-grade disease and an altered splicing network in pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma.
Neoplasia
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2013
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Pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a morphologically and genetically heterogeneous malignancy commonly classified into three histologic subtypes, namely, alveolar, embryonal, and anaplastic. An issue that continues to challenge effective RMS patient prognosis is the dearth of molecular markers predictive of disease stage irrespective of tumor subtype. Our study involving a panel of 70 RMS tumors has identified specific alternative splice variants of the oncogenes Murine Double Minute 2 (MDM2) and MDM4 as potential biomarkers for RMS. Our results have demonstrated the strong association of genotoxic-stress inducible splice forms MDM2-ALT1 (91.6% Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group stage 4 tumors) and MDM4-ALT2 (90.9% MDM4-ALT2-positive T2 stage tumors) with high-risk metastatic RMS. Moreover, MDM2-ALT1-positive metastatic tumors belonged to both the alveolar (50%) and embryonal (41.6%) subtypes, making this the first known molecular marker for high-grade metastatic disease across the most common RMS subtypes. Furthermore, our results show that MDM2-ALT1 expression can function by directly contribute to metastatic behavior and promote the invasion of RMS cells through a matrigel-coated membrane. Additionally, expression of both MDM2-ALT1 and MDM4-ALT2 increased anchorage-independent cell-growth in soft agar assays. Intriguingly, we observed a unique coordination in the splicing of MDM2-ALT1 and MDM4-ALT2 in approximately 24% of tumor samples in a manner similar to genotoxic stress response in cell lines. To further explore splicing network alterations with possible relevance to RMS disease, we used an exon microarray approach to examine stress-inducible splicing in an RMS cell line (Rh30) and observed striking parallels between stress-responsive alternative splicing and constitutive splicing in RMS tumors.
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Modeling nasal physiology changes due to septal perforations.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
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To use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology to help providers understand (1) how septal perforations may alter nasal physiology and (2) how these alterations are influenced by perforation size and location.
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Exploration of the structure-activity relationship of a novel tetracyclic class of TSPO ligands-potential novel positron emitting tomography imaging agents.
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2013
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A series of novel TSPO ligands based on the tetracyclic class of translocator protein (TSPO) ligands first described by Okubo et al. was synthesised and evaluated as potential positron emitting tomography (PET) ligands for imaging TPSO in vivo. Fluorine-18 labelling of the molecules was achieved using direct radiolabelling or synthon based labelling approaches. Several of the ligands prepared have promising profiles as potential TSPO PET imaging ligands.
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UGT1A1 genetic analysis as a diagnostic aid for individuals with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia.
J. Pediatr.
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2013
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To assess the clinical utility of UGT1A1 genetic testing and describe the spectrum and prevalence of UGT1A1 variations identified in pediatric unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia (UCH), and to characterize specific genotype-phenotype relationships in suspected Gilbert and Crigler-Najjar syndromes.
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A transcription factor code defines nine sensory interneuron subtypes in the mechanosensory area of the spinal cord.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Interneurons in the dorsal spinal cord process and relay innocuous and nociceptive somatosensory information from cutaneous receptors that sense touch, temperature and pain. These neurons display a well-defined organization with respect to their afferent innervation. Nociceptive afferents innervate lamina I and II, while cutaneous mechanosensory afferents primarily innervate sensory interneurons that are located in lamina III-IV. In this study, we outline a combinatorial transcription factor code that defines nine different inhibitory and excitatory interneuron populations in laminae III-IV of the postnatal cord. This transcription factor code reveals a high degree of molecular diversity in the neurons that make up laminae III-IV, and it lays the foundation for systematically analyzing and manipulating these different neuronal populations to assess their function. In addition, we find that many of the transcription factors that are expressed in the dorsal spinal cord at early postnatal times continue to be expressed in the adult, raising questions about their function in mature neurons and opening the door to their genetic manipulation in adult animals.
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Natural and induced T regulatory cells in cancer.
Front Immunol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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CD4+Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells control many facets of immune responses ranging from autoimmune diseases, to inflammatory conditions, and cancer in an attempt to maintain immune homeostasis. Natural Treg (nTreg) cells develop in the thymus and constitute a critical arm of active mechanisms of peripheral tolerance particularly to self antigens. A growing body of knowledge now supports the existence of induced Treg (iTreg) cells which may derive from a population of conventional CD4+ T cells. The fork-head transcription factor (Foxp3) typically is expressed by natural CD4+ Treg cells, and thus serves as a marker to definitively identify these cells. On the contrary, there is less consensus on what constitutes iTreg cells as their precise definition has been somewhat elusive. This is in part due to their distinct phenotypes which are shaped by exposure to certain inflammatory or "assault" signals stemming from the underlying immune disorder. The "policing" activity of Treg cells tends to be uni-directional in several pathological conditions. On one end of the spectrum, Treg cell suppressive activity is beneficial by curtailing T cell response against self-antigens and allergens thus preventing autoimmune diseases and allergies. On the other end however, their inhibitory roles in limiting immune response against pseudo-self antigens as in tumors often culminates into negative outcomes. In this review, we focus on this latter aspect of Treg cell immunobiology by highlighting the involvement of nTreg cells in various animal models and human tumors. We further discuss iTreg cells, relationship with their natural counterpart, and potential co-operation between the two in modulating immune response against tumors. Lastly, we discuss studies focusing on these cells as targets for improving anti-tumor immunity.
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Increasing access to the MDR-TB surveillance programme through a collaborative model in western Kenya.
Trop. Med. Int. Health
PUBLISHED: 12-05-2011
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Kenya, like many resource-constrained countries, has a single mycobacterial laboratory, centrally located in Nairobi, with capacity for drug-susceptibility testing (DST) - the gold standard in diagnosing drug-resistant tuberculosis. We describe and evaluate a novel operational design that attempts to overcome diagnostic delivery barriers.
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[¹?F]GE-180: a novel fluorine-18 labelled PET tracer for imaging Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO).
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 11-17-2011
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A series of tricyclic compounds have been synthesised and evaluated in vitro for affinity against Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) and for preferred imaging properties. The most promising of the compounds were radiolabelled and evaluated in vivo to determine biodistribution and specificity for high expressing TSPO regions. Metabolite profiling in brain and plasma was also investigated. Evaluation in an autoradiography model of neuroinflammation was also carried out for the best compound, 12a ([(18)F]GE-180).
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Histopathological findings in 29 lymph node biopsies with increased IgG4 plasma cells.
Mod. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2011
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IgG4-related sclerosing disease encompasses a family of disorders associated with increased numbers of IgG4 plasma cells and mass forming lesions in various tissues. Lymphadenopathy is a common finding, seen in up to 80% of cases. In the largest series of cases to date, we describe histologic, immunohistochemical, special stain and flow cytometric findings in 29 cases of enlarged lymph nodes with increased IgG4 plasma cells. Lymph node biopsies showed all resection specimens; no needle core biopsies of tissue were evaluated. Cases were considered to have increased numbers of IgG4 plasma cells using the histological criteria outlined by Cheuk and Chan (2010): IgG4 plasma cells >50 cells in a high-power field and >40% of IgG-positive plasma cells positive for IgG4. Additionally, increased intrafollicular plasma cells were a common finding. The lymph nodes showed a variety of reactive histological features including follicular hyperplasia, progressive transformation of germinal centers, interfollicular expansions, variable degrees of fibrosis, increased histiocytes and occasionally an appearance similar to that of plasma cell Castleman disease.
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Effects of anatomy and particle size on nasal sprays and nebulizers.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2011
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To study the effects of nasal deformity on aerosol penetration past the nasal valve (NV) for varying particle sizes using sprays or nebulizers.
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Data and safety monitoring policy for National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases clinical trials.
Clin Trials
PUBLISHED: 10-24-2011
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Historically, four divisions of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) that manage clinical trials and oversee data and safety monitoring have operated fairly autonomously with respect to their approaches to Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) operations. We recognized the need for a revised policy on DSMB operations in an effort to encourage greater harmonization of procedures across the four divisions.
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Frequency of undetected CYP2D6 hybrid genes in clinical samples: impact on phenotype prediction.
Drug Metab. Dispos.
PUBLISHED: 10-17-2011
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Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is highly polymorphic. CYP2D6-2D7 hybrid genes can be present in samples containing CYP2D6*4 and CYP2D6*10 alleles. CYP2D7-2D6 hybrid genes can be present in samples with duplication signals and in samples with homozygous genotyping results. The frequency of hybrid genes in clinical samples is unknown. We evaluated 1390 samples for undetected hybrid genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, PCR fragment analysis, TaqMan copy number assays, DNA sequencing, and allele-specific primer extension assay. Of 508 CYP2D6*4-containing samples, 109 (21.5%) harbored CYP2D6*68 + *4-like, whereas 9 (1.8%) harbored CYP2D6*4N + *4-like. Of 209 CYP2D6*10-containing samples, 44 (21.1%) were found to have CYP2D6*36 + *10. Of 332 homozygous samples, 4 (1.2%) harbored a single CYP2D7-2D6 hybrid, and of 341 samples with duplication signals, 25 (7.3%) harbored an undetected CYP2D7-2D6 hybrid. Phenotype before and after accurate genotyping was predicted using a method in clinical use. The presence of hybrid genes had no effect on the phenotype prediction of CYP2D6*4- and CYP2D6*10-containing samples. Four of four (100%) homozygous samples containing a CYP2D7-2D6 gene had a change in predicted phenotype, and 23 of 25 (92%) samples with a duplication signal and a CYP2D7-2D6 gene had a change in predicted phenotype. Four novel genes were identified (CYP2D6*13A1 variants 1 and 2, CYP2D6*13G1, and CYP2D6*13G2), and two novel hybrid tandem structures consisting of CYP2D6*13B + *68×2 + *4-like and CYP2D6*13A1 variant 2 + *1×N were observed.
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Antiapoptotic protein Lifeguard is required for survival and maintenance of Purkinje and granular cells.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 09-28-2011
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Lifeguard (LFG) is an inhibitor of Fas-mediated cell death and is highly expressed in the cerebellum. We investigated the biological role of LFG in the cerebellum in vivo, using mice with reduced LFG expression generated by shRNA lentiviral transgenesis (shLFG mice) as well as LFG null mice. We found that LFG plays a role in cerebellar development by affecting cerebellar size, internal granular layer (IGL) thickness, and Purkinje cell (PC) development. All these features are more severe in early developmental stages and show substantial recovery overtime, providing a remarkable example of cerebellar plasticity. In adult mice, LFG plays a role in PC maintenance shown by reduced cellular density and abnormal morphology with increased active caspase 8 and caspase 3 immunostaining in shLFG and knockout (KO) PCs. We studied the mechanism of action of LFG as an inhibitor of the Fas pathway and provided evidence of the neuroprotective role of LFG in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) and PCs in an organotypic cerebellar culture system. Biochemical analysis of the Fas pathway revealed that LFG inhibits Fas-mediated cell death by interfering with caspase 8 activation. This result is supported by the increased number of active caspase 8-positive PCs in adult mice lacking LFG. These data demonstrate that LFG is required for proper development and survival of granular and Purkinje cells and suggest LFG may play a role in cerebellar disorders.
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Invasional meltdown: invader-invader mutualism facilitates a secondary invasion.
Ecology
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2011
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In multiply invaded ecosystems, introduced species should interact with each other as well as with native species. Invader-invader interactions may affect the success of further invaders by altering attributes of recipient communities and propagule pressure. The invasional meltdown hypothesis (IMH) posits that positive interactions among invaders initiate positive population-level feedback that intensifies impacts and promotes secondary invasions. IMH remains controversial: few studies show feedback between invaders that amplifies their effects, and none yet demonstrate facilitation of entry and spread of secondary invaders. Our results show that supercolonies of an alien ant, promoted by mutualism with introduced honeydew-secreting scale insects, permitted invasion by an exotic land snail on Christmas Island, Indian Ocean. Modeling of land snail spread over 750 sites across 135 km2 over seven years showed that the probability of land snail invasion was facilitated 253-fold in ant supercolonies but impeded in intact forest where predaceous native land crabs remained abundant. Land snail occurrence at neighboring sites, a measure of propagule pressure, also promoted land snail spread. Site comparisons and experiments revealed that ant supercolonies, by killing land crabs but not land snails, disrupted biotic resistance and provided enemy-free space. Predation pressure on land snails was lower (28.6%), survival 115 times longer, and abundance 20-fold greater in supercolonies than in intact forest. Whole-ecosystem suppression of supercolonies reversed the probability of land snail invasion by allowing recolonization of land crabs; land snails were much less likely (0.79%) to invade sites where supercolonies were suppressed than where they remained intact. Our results provide strong empirical evidence for IMH by demonstrating that mutualism between invaders reconfigures key interactions in the recipient community. This facilitates entry of secondary invaders and elevates propagule pressure, propagating their spread at the whole-ecosystem level. We show that identification and management of key facilitative interactions in invaded ecosystems can be used to reverse impacts and restore resistance to further invasions.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.