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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Does upper limb coordination predict walking speed in older adults? A cross-sectional study.
J Geriatr Phys Ther
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2014
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Walking speed is a measure of physical function in older adults. Older adults are sometimes nonambulatory, however, and proxy measures for walking speed may be indicated. Since limb coordination tests can be conducted in non-weight-bearing positions, they may provide that capability. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between timed limb coordination and preferred and maximum walking speed, controlling for other known determinants of walking speed.
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Does Upper Limb Coordination Predict Walking Speed in Older Adults? A Cross-Sectional Study.
J Geriatr Phys Ther
PUBLISHED: 11-28-2013
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Walking speed is a measure of physical function in older adults. Older adults are sometimes nonambulatory, however, and proxy measures for walking speed may be indicated. Since limb coordination tests can be conducted in non-weight-bearing positions, they may provide that capability. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between timed limb coordination and preferred and maximum walking speed, controlling for other known determinants of walking speed.
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Timed limb coordination performance is associated with walking speed in healthy older adults: a cross-sectional exploratory study.
Gait Posture
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2013
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Walking speed reflects quality of life, health status and physical function in older adults but interpreting measures of walking speed is affected by several confounders such as gender, age and height. Additionally, walking speed is influenced by neurologic conditions that impair limb coordination. In absence of defined pathology, it is less clear how varying levels of limb coordination influence walking speed. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between limb coordination and walking speed in older adults, controlling for effects of gender, age and height. Sixty-nine healthy, community-dwelling individuals over the age of 60 participated in the study. Participants completed a battery of timed upper and lower limb coordination tests. Normal and fast walking speed were measured over the inner six meters of a 10 m walkway. Correlation and regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between limb coordination performance and walking speed. Controlling for gender, age and height, variance in normal walking speed was accounted for by variance in pronation-supination performance (partial r = -0.396, partial r(2) = 0.16) and variance in fast walking speed was accounted for by variance in finger-to-nose performance (partial r = -0.356, partial r(2) = 0.13). The findings support our hypothesis that limb coordination performance would correlate with walking speed in healthy older adults. Moreover, limb coordination performance attenuated the effects of gender, age and height on walking speed. Limb coordination may be a modifiable determinant of walking speed in older adults.
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Outcome measures in neurological physical therapy practice: part II. A patient-centered process.
J Neurol Phys Ther
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2011
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Physical therapists working in neurological practice must make choices about which standardized outcome measures are most appropriate for each patient. Significant time constraints in the clinic limit the number of measures that one can reasonably administer. Therapists must choose measures that will provide results that guide the selection of appropriate interventions and are likely to show clinically meaningful change. Therefore, therapists must be able to compare the merits of available measures to identify those that are most relevant for each patient and setting. This article describes a process for selecting outcome measures and illustrates the use of that process with a patient who has had a stroke. The link between selecting objective outcome measures and tracking patient progress is emphasized. Comparisons are made between 2 motor function measures (the Fugl-Meyer Assessment [FMA] of Physical Performance vs the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement), and 2 balance measures (Berg Balance Scale vs the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale). The use of objective outcome measures allows therapists to quantify information that previously had been described in subjective terms. This allows the tracking of progress, and the comparison of effectiveness and costs across interventions, settings, providers, and patient characteristics.
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Brainstem cavernous malformations: anatomical, clinical, and surgical considerations.
Neurosurg Focus
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2010
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Symptomatic brainstem cavernous malformations carry a high risk of permanent neurological deficit related to recurrent hemorrhage, which justifies aggressive management. Detailed knowledge of the microscopic and surface anatomy is important for understanding the clinical presentation, predicting possible surgical complications, and formulating an adequate surgical plan. In this article the authors review and illustrate the surgical and microscopic anatomy of the brainstem, provide anatomoclinical correlations, and illustrate a few clinical cases of cavernous malformations in the most common brainstem areas.
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Values for timed limb coordination tests in a sample of healthy older adults.
Age Ageing
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timed limb coordination tests are reliable measures of motor performance but many lack published reference values.
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Coordination tests in persons with acute central nervous system pathology: assessment of interrater reliability and known-group validity.
J Neurol Phys Ther
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Coordination testing is a standard part of the neurologic examination, yet the psychometric properties of many tests used by practitioners are unknown. This study investigated the interrater reliability and known-group validity of limb coordination tests in participants with acute central nervous system (CNS) pathology.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.