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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Reduction of cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury using an osmotic transport device.
J. Neurotrauma
PUBLISHED: 10-14-2014
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Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is significant, from a public health standpoint, because it is a major cause of the morbidity and mortality of young people. Cerebral edema after a TBI, if untreated, can lead to devastating damage of the remaining tissue. The current therapies of severe TBI (sTBI), as outlined by the Brain Trauma Foundation, are often ineffective, thus a new method for the treatment of sTBI is necessary. Herein, the reduction of cerebral edema, after TBI, using an osmotic transport device (OTD) was evaluated. Controlled cortical impact (CCI) was performed on adult female CD-1 mice, and cerebral edema was allowed to form for 3?h, followed by 2?h of treatment. The treatment groups were craniectomy only, craniectomy with a hydrogel, OTD without bovine serum albumin (BSA), and OTD. After CCI, brain water content was significantly higher for animals treated with a craniectomy only, craniectomy with a hydrogel, and OTD without BSA, compared to that of control animals. However, when TBI animals were treated with an OTD, brain water content was not significantly higher than that of controls. Further, brain water content of TBI animals treated with an OTD was significantly reduced, compared to that of untreated TBI animals, TBI animals treated with a craniectomy and a hydrogel, and TBI animals treated with an OTD without BSA. Here, we demonstrate the successful reduction of cerebral edema, as determined by brain water content, after TBI using an OTD. These results demonstrate proof of principle for direct water extraction from edematous brain tissue by direct osmotherapy using an OTD.
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Follistatin-like 1 attenuates apoptosis via disco-interacting protein 2 homolog A/Akt pathway after middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2014
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Follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1), an extracellular glycoprotein, has been reported to decrease apoptosis in ischemic cardiac diseases, but its effect in ischemic stroke has not been examined. We hypothesized that recombinant FSTL1 attenuates neuronal apoptosis through its receptor disco-interacting protein 2 homolog A (DIP2A) and the Akt pathway after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats.
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A generalized free-solvent model for the osmotic pressure of multi-component solutions containing protein-protein interactions.
Math Biosci
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2014
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The free-solvent model has been shown to have excellent predictability of the osmotic pressure for single and binary non-interactive proteins in aqueous solutions. Here the free-solvent model is extended to be more generalized by including the contributions of intra- and inter-protein interactions to the osmotic pressure of a solution in the form of homo- and hetero-multimers. The solute-solvent interactions are considered to be unique for each homo- and hetero-multimer in solution. The effect of the various generalized free-solvent model parameters on the osmotic pressure are examined for a single protein solution with a homo-dimer, a binary protein solution with no protein-protein interactions, and a binary protein solution with a hetero-dimer. Finally, the limitations associated with the generalized free-solvent model are discussed.
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Correlation between subacute sensorimotor deficits and brain edema in two mouse models of intracerebral hemorrhage.
Behav. Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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Formation of brain edema after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is highly associated with its poor outcome. However, the relationship between cerebral edema and behavioral deficits has not been thoroughly examined in the preclinical setting. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the ability of common sensorimotor tests to predict the extent of brain edema in two mouse models of ICH. One hundred male CD-1 mice were subjected to sham surgery or ICH induction via intrastriatal injection of either autologous blood (30 ?L) or bacterial collagenase (0.0375U or 0.075U). At 24 and 72 h after surgery, animals underwent a battery of behavioral tests, including the modified Garcia neuroscore (Neuroscore), corner turn test (CTT), forelimb placing test (FPT), wire hang task (WHT) and beam walking (BW). Brain edema was evaluated via the wet weight/dry weight method. Intrastriatal injection of autologous blood or bacterial collagenase resulted in a significant increase in brain water content and associated sensorimotor deficits (p<0.05). A significant correlation between brain edema and sensorimotor deficits was observed for all behavioral tests except for WHT and BW. Based on these findings, we recommend implementing the Neuroscore, CTT and/or FPT in preclinical studies of unilateral ICH in mice.
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Neuroprotective effect of hydrogen-rich saline against neurologic damage and apoptosis in early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage: possible role of the Akt/GSK3? signaling pathway.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Early brain injury (EBI) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Neuronal apoptosis is involved in the pathological process of EBI. Hydrogen can inhibit neuronal apoptosis and attenuate EBI following SAH. However, the molecular mechanism underlying hydrogen-mediated anti-apoptotic effects in SAH has not been elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate whether hydrogen alleviates EBI after SAH, specifically neuronal apoptosis, partially via the Akt/GSK3? signaling pathway.
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Interpretation of negative second virial coefficients from non-attractive protein solution osmotic pressure data: An alternate perspective.
Biophys. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2013
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A negative second virial coefficient has long been a predictor of potential protein crystallization and salting out. However, the assumption that this is due to attractive solute-solute interactions remains a source of debate. Here we reexamine the second virial coefficient from protein osmometry in terms of the free-solvent model. The free-solvent model has been shown to provide excellent predictions of the osmotic pressure of concentrated and crowded environments for aqueous protein solutions in moderate ionic strengths. The free-solvent model relies on two critical parameters, hydration and ion binding, both which can be determined independently of osmotic pressure data. Herein, the free-solvent model is mathematically represented as a virial expansion model and the second virial coefficient is expressed in terms of solute-solvent interactions, namely hydration and ion binding. Hydration and ion binding values are then used to estimate the second virial coefficient at various protein concentrations for three model proteins ovalbumin (OVA), bovine serum albumin (BSA), and hen egg lysozyme (HEL) in various monovalent salt aqueous solutions. The results show that the conditions for obtaining a negative second virial coefficient emerge when the ionic strength of the influenced region of the protein is higher than that of the bulk. This analysis suggests a plausible explanation as to why proteins are more favorable for salting out or crystallization when the solution is represented by a negative second virial coefficient.
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Reverse shoulder arthroplasty glenoid fixation: is there a benefit in using four instead of two screws?
J Shoulder Elbow Surg
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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To allow osseous integration to occur and thus provide long-term stability, initial glenoid baseplate fixation must be sufficiently rigid. A major contributing factor to initial rigid fixation is baseplate screw fixation. Current baseplate designs use a 4-screw fixation construct. However, recent literature suggests adequate fixation can be achieved with fewer than 4 screws. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether a 4-screw construct provides more baseplate stability than a 2-screw construct.
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Predicting the activity coefficients of free-solvent for concentrated globular protein solutions using independently determined physical parameters.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The activity coefficient is largely considered an empirical parameter that was traditionally introduced to correct the non-ideality observed in thermodynamic systems such as osmotic pressure. Here, the activity coefficient of free-solvent is related to physically realistic parameters and a mathematical expression is developed to directly predict the activity coefficients of free-solvent, for aqueous protein solutions up to near-saturation concentrations. The model is based on the free-solvent model, which has previously been shown to provide excellent prediction of the osmotic pressure of concentrated and crowded globular proteins in aqueous solutions up to near-saturation concentrations. Thus, this model uses only the independently determined, physically realizable quantities: mole fraction, solvent accessible surface area, and ion binding, in its prediction. Predictions are presented for the activity coefficients of free-solvent for near-saturated protein solutions containing either bovine serum albumin or hemoglobin. As a verification step, the predictability of the model for the activity coefficient of sucrose solutions was evaluated. The predicted activity coefficients of free-solvent are compared to the calculated activity coefficients of free-solvent based on osmotic pressure data. It is observed that the predicted activity coefficients are increasingly dependent on the solute-solvent parameters as the protein concentration increases to near-saturation concentrations.
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Improved survival following cerebral edema using a novel hollow fiber-hydrogel device.
J. Neurosurg.
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Cerebral edema is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many disease states. Current therapies of cerebral edema are often ineffective in treating severe edema. Here, the authors develop a hollow fiber-hydrogel device (HFHD) for direct surface contact-based treatment of severe cerebral edema.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.