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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Admixture mapping identifies a locus at 15q21.2-22.3 associated with keloid formation in African Americans.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2014
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Keloids are benign dermal tumors that occur ~20 times more often in African versus Caucasian descent individuals. While most keloids occur sporadically, a genetic predisposition is supported by both familial aggregation of some keloids and the large differences in risk among populations. Yet, no well-established genetic risk factors for keloids have been identified. In this study, we conducted admixture mapping and whole-exome association using 478 African Americans (AAs) samples (122 cases, 356 controls) with exome genotyping data to identify regions where local ancestry associated with keloid risk. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations under admixture peaks. A significant mapping peak was observed on chr15q21.2-22.3. This peak included NEDD4, a gene previously implicated in a keloid genome-wide association study (GWAS) of Japanese individuals later validated in a Chinese cohort. While we observed modest evidence for association with NEDD4, a more significant association was observed at (myosin 1E) MYO1E. A genome scan not including the 15q21-22 region also identified associations at MYO7A (rs35641839, odds ratio [OR] = 4.71, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 2.38-9.32, p = 8.34 × 10(-6)) at 11q13.5. The identification of SNPs in two myosin genes strongly associated with keloid formation suggests that an altered cytoskeleton contributes to the enhanced migratory and invasive properties of keloid fibroblasts. Our findings support the admixture mapping approach for the study of keloid risk, and indicate potentially common genetic elements on chr15q21.2-22.3 in causation of keloids in AAs, Japanese, and Chinese populations.
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First-trimester antihistamine exposure and risk of spontaneous abortion or preterm birth.
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
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We tested whether antihistamine exposure during early pregnancy is associated with spontaneous abortion (SAB) or preterm birth (PTB).
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Genetic epidemiology of pelvic organ prolapse: a systematic review.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2014
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Given current evidence supporting a genetic predisposition for pelvic organ prolapse, we conducted a systematic review of published literature on the genetic epidemiology of pelvic organ prolapse. Inclusion criteria were linkage studies, candidate gene association and genome-wide association studies in adult women published in English and indexed in PubMed through Dec. 2012, with no limit on date of publication. Methodology adhered to the PRISMA guidelines. Data were systematically extracted by 2 reviewers and graded by the Venice criteria for studies of genetic associations. A metaanalysis was performed on all single nucleotide polymorphisms evaluated by 2 or more studies with similar methodology. The metaanalysis suggests that collagen type 3 alpha 1 (COL3A1) rs1800255 genotype AA is associated with pelvic organ prolapse (odds ratio, 4.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.91-11.98; P = .001) compared with the reference genotype GG in populations of Asian and Dutch women. There was little evidence of heterogeneity for rs1800255 (P value for heterogeneity = .94; proportion of variance because of heterogeneity, I(2) = 0.00%). There was insufficient evidence to determine whether other single nucleotide polymorphisms evaluated by 2 or more papers were associated with pelvic organ prolapse. An association with pelvic organ prolapse was seen in individual studies for estrogen receptor alpha (ER-?) rs2228480 GA, COL3A1 exon 31, chromosome 9q21 (heterogeneity logarithm of the odds score 3.41) as well as 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms identified by a genome-wide association study. Overall, individual studies were of small sample size and often of poor quality. Future studies would benefit from more rigorous study design as outlined in the Venice recommendations.
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Uterine leiomyomata and cesarean birth risk: a prospective cohort with standardized imaging.
Ann Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2013
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To determine if women with leiomyomata detected using uniform ultrasound methods are at increased risk of cesarean birth, without regard to indication.
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Association of age at menarche with increasing number of fibroids in a cohort of women who underwent standardized ultrasound assessment.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2013
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Age at menarche has been associated with several reproductive conditions, and frequencies differ by race. Racial disparities also impact fibroid risk. We comprehensively examined the relationship between age at menarche, fibroid characteristics, and race. Women were enrolled in Right From the Start (2001-2010), a multistate study that systematically screened for fibroids during very early pregnancy. Endovaginal ultrasounds were conducted, and fibroid presence, number, type, volume, and diameter were recorded according to standardized definitions. Generalized estimating equations adjusted for correlations within study site were used to estimate associations between age at menarche and fibroid status and to test for interactions with race. Of 5,023 participants, 11% had a fibroid. Seven percent underwent menarche before 11 years of age and 11% at 15 years or later. We did not observe interactions between age at menarche and race. A 1-year increase in age at menarche was inversely associated with fibroids (adjusted risk ratio = 0.87, 95% confidence interval: 0.82, 0.91). Early age at menarche had a similar positive association in individual analyses with fibroid size, type, and location but was stronger for multiple fibroids (adjusted risk ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.68, 0.83). Our findings confirm other reports of an association between age at menarche and fibroid development (regardless of characteristics), demonstrate no effect modification by race, and suggest a stronger association for women with multiple fibroids, possibly reflecting a stronger association for early-onset disease.
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Variants in BET1L and TNRC6B associate with increasing fibroid volume and fibroid type among European Americans.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2013
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Uterine fibroids (UFs) affect 77 % of women by menopause and account for $9.4 billion in yearly healthcare costs. We recently replicated findings from the first UF genome-wide association study (GWAS), conducted in the Japanese. Here we tested these GWAS-discovered SNPs for association with UF characteristics to further assess whether risk varies by sub-phenotypes of UFs. Women were enrolled in Right from the Start (RFTS) and the BioVU DNA repository (BioVU). UF status was determined by pelvic imaging. We tested the top GWAS-associated SNPs for association with UF characteristics (RFTS: type, number, volume; BioVU: type) using covariate adjusted logistic and linear regression. We also combined association results of UF type using meta-analysis. 456 European American (EA) cases and 1,549 controls were examined. Trinucleotide repeat containing 6B (TNRC6B) rs12484776 associated with volume in RFTS (? = 0.40, 95 % CI 0.05-0.75, p = 0.024). RFTS analyses evaluating stratified quartiles of volume showed the strongest OR at rs12484776 for the largest volume (16.6-179.1 cc, odds ratio (OR) = 2.19, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.07-4.46, p = 0.031). Meta-analysis showed a strong association at blocked early in transport 1 homolog (BET1L) rs2280543 for intramural UFs (meta-OR = 0.51, standard error (SE) = 0.14, Q = 0.590, I = 0, p = 2.48 × 10(-6)), which is stronger than the overall association with UF risk. This study is the first to evaluate these SNPs for association with UF characteristics and suggests these genes associate with increasing UF volume and protection from intramural UF in EAs.
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BET1L and TNRC6B associate with uterine fibroid risk among European Americans.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2013
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Uterine fibroid (UFs) affect 77 % of women by menopause and account for $9.4 billion in healthcare costs each year. Although UFs are heritable, genetic risk is poorly understood. The first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of UFs was recently performed in a Japanese population, with reported genome-wide significance for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across three chromosomal regions. We tested these SNPs for association with UFs in US cohorts. Women were enrolled in the Right from the Start (RFTS) cohort and the BioVU DNA repository. UF status in both cohorts was determined by pelvic imaging. We tested 65 candidate and haplotype-tagging SNPs for association with UFs presence using logistic regression in RFTS and the top three GWAS-associated SNPs in BioVU. We also combined association results from both cohorts using meta-analysis. 1,086 European American (EA) cases and 1,549 controls were examined. Two SNP associations replicated [blocked early in transport 1 homolog (BET1L) rs2280543, RFTS-BioVU meta-odds ratio (OR) = 0.67 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.38-0.96, Q = 0.70, I = 0, p = 6.9 × 10?³; trinucleotide repeat containing 6B (TNRC6B) rs12484776, RFTS-BioVU meta-OR = 1.21, 95 % CI 1.07-1.35, Q = 0.24, I = 28.37, p = 8.7 × 10?³). Meta-analyses combining evidence from RFTS, BioVU, and prior GWAS showed little heterogeneity in effect sizes across studies, with meta-p values between 7.45 × 10?? and 3.89 × 10??, which were stronger than prior GWAS and supported associations observed for all previously identified loci. These data suggest common variants increase risk for UF in both EA and Japanese populations. However, further research is needed to assess the role of these genes across other racial groups.
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Risk of miscarriage among black women and white women in a U.S. Prospective Cohort Study.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2013
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Many adverse pregnancy outcomes differ by race. We examined the association between self-reported race and miscarriage (pregnancy loss at <20 weeks) in a community-based pregnancy cohort. Women from the southeastern United States (North Carolina, Texas, and Tennessee) were enrolled in "Right from the Start" from 2000 to 2009. They were recruited while trying to conceive or during early pregnancy. Participants completed study ultrasound examinations, interviews, and consent forms for review of medical records. We used proportional hazard models to examine miscarriage risk among black women compared with white women, adjusted for confounders. There were 537 observed miscarriages among 4,070 women, 23% of whom self-identified as black (n = 932). The life table-adjusted cumulative risk of loss after gestational week 5 was 21.3%. With adjustment for age and alcohol use, blacks had increased risk of miscarriage compared with whites (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.57, 95% confidence interval: 1.27, 1.93). When risk of loss before gestational week 10 was dichotomized at the median gestational age, there was little difference, but black women had a greater risk thereafter compared with white women (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence interval: 1.48, 2.51). Early pregnancy ultrasound examinations did not differ by race. In summary, self-reported race is independently associated with risk of miscarriage, and the higher risk for black women is concentrated in gestational weeks 10-20.
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Racial differences in risk of spontaneous abortions associated with periconceptional over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug exposure.
Ann Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2013
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Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most common medications reported in pregnancy. NSAIDs directly impact prostaglandin pathways and have been proposed as potential risk factors for spontaneous abortions (SABs, gestation <20 weeks). SAB risk and drug response across several medications differ by race; therefore, we evaluated whether associations between NSAIDs and SAB risk differ by race.
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A meta-analysis identifies new loci associated with body mass index in individuals of African ancestry.
Keri L Monda, Gary K Chen, Kira C Taylor, Cameron Palmer, Todd L Edwards, Leslie A Lange, Maggie C Y Ng, Adebowale A Adeyemo, Matthew A Allison, Lawrence F Bielak, Guanjie Chen, Mariaelisa Graff, Marguerite R Irvin, Suhn K Rhie, Guo Li, Yongmei Liu, Youfang Liu, Yingchang Lu, Michael A Nalls, Yan V Sun, Mary K Wojczynski, Lisa R Yanek, Melinda C Aldrich, Adeyinka Ademola, Christopher I Amos, Elisa V Bandera, Cathryn H Bock, Angela Britton, Ulrich Broeckel, Quiyin Cai, Neil E Caporaso, Chris S Carlson, John Carpten, Graham Casey, Wei-Min Chen, Fang Chen, Yii-Der I Chen, Charleston W K Chiang, Gerhard A Coetzee, Ellen Demerath, Sandra L Deming-Halverson, Ryan W Driver, Patricia Dubbert, Mary F Feitosa, Ye Feng, Barry I Freedman, Elizabeth M Gillanders, Omri Gottesman, Xiuqing Guo, Talin Haritunians, Tamara Harris, Curtis C Harris, Anselm J M Hennis, Dena G Hernandez, Lorna H McNeill, Timothy D Howard, Barbara V Howard, Virginia J Howard, Karen C Johnson, Sun J Kang, Brendan J Keating, Suzanne Kolb, Lewis H Kuller, Abdullah Kutlar, Carl D Langefeld, Guillaume Lettre, Kurt Lohman, Vaneet Lotay, Helen Lyon, JoAnn E Manson, William Maixner, Yan A Meng, Kristine R Monroe, Imran Morhason-Bello, Adam B Murphy, Josyf C Mychaleckyj, Rajiv Nadukuru, Katherine L Nathanson, Uma Nayak, Amidou N'Diaye, Barbara Nemesure, Suh-Yuh Wu, M Cristina Leske, Christine Neslund-Dudas, Marian Neuhouser, Sarah Nyante, Heather Ochs-Balcom, Adesola Ogunniyi, Temidayo O Ogundiran, Oladosu Ojengbede, Olufunmilayo I Olopade, Julie R Palmer, Edward A Ruiz-Narváez, Nicholette D Palmer, Michael F Press, Evandine Rampersaud, Laura J Rasmussen-Torvik, Jorge L Rodriguez-Gil, Babatunde Salako, Eric E Schadt, Ann G Schwartz, Daniel A Shriner, David Siscovick, Shad B Smith, Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Elizabeth K Speliotes, Margaret R Spitz, Lara Sucheston, Herman Taylor, Bamidele O Tayo, Margaret A Tucker, David J Van Den Berg, Digna R Velez Edwards, Zhaoming Wang, John K Wiencke, Thomas W Winkler, John S Witte, Margaret Wrensch, Xifeng Wu, James J Yang, Albert M Levin, Taylor R Young, Neil A Zakai, Mary Cushman, Krista A Zanetti, Jing Hua Zhao, Wei Zhao, Yonglan Zheng, Jie Zhou, Regina G Ziegler, Joseph M Zmuda, Jyotika K Fernandes, Gary S Gilkeson, Diane L Kamen, Kelly J Hunt, Ida J Spruill, Christine B Ambrosone, Stefan Ambs, Donna K Arnett, Larry Atwood, Diane M Becker, Sonja I Berndt, Leslie Bernstein, William J Blot, Ingrid B Borecki, Erwin P Bottinger, Donald W Bowden, Gregory Burke, Stephen J Chanock, Richard S Cooper, Jingzhong Ding, David Duggan, Michele K Evans, Caroline Fox, W Timothy Garvey, Jonathan P Bradfield, Hakon Hakonarson, Struan F A Grant, Ann Hsing, Lisa Chu, Jennifer J Hu, Dezheng Huo, Sue A Ingles, Esther M John, Joanne M Jordan, Edmond K Kabagambe, Sharon L R Kardia, Rick A Kittles, Phyllis J Goodman, Eric A Klein, Laurence N Kolonel, Loic Le Marchand, Simin Liu, Barbara McKnight, Robert C Millikan, Thomas H Mosley, Badri Padhukasahasram, L Keoki Williams, Sanjay R Patel, Ulrike Peters, Curtis A Pettaway, Patricia A Peyser, Bruce M Psaty, Susan Redline, Charles N Rotimi, Benjamin A Rybicki, Michèle M Sale, Pamela J Schreiner, Lisa B Signorello, Andrew B Singleton, Janet L Stanford, Sara S Strom, Michael J Thun, Mara Vitolins, Wei Zheng, Jason H Moore, Scott M Williams, Shamika Ketkar, Xiaofeng Zhu, Alan B Zonderman, , Charles Kooperberg, George J Papanicolaou, Brian E Henderson, Alex P Reiner, Joel N Hirschhorn, Ruth J F Loos, Kari E North, Christopher A Haiman.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2013
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 36 loci associated with body mass index (BMI), predominantly in populations of European ancestry. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the association of >3.2 million SNPs with BMI in 39,144 men and women of African ancestry and followed up the most significant associations in an additional 32,268 individuals of African ancestry. We identified one new locus at 5q33 (GALNT10, rs7708584, P = 3.4 × 10(-11)) and another at 7p15 when we included data from the GIANT consortium (MIR148A-NFE2L3, rs10261878, P = 1.2 × 10(-10)). We also found suggestive evidence of an association at a third locus at 6q16 in the African-ancestry sample (KLHL32, rs974417, P = 6.9 × 10(-8)). Thirty-two of the 36 previously established BMI variants showed directionally consistent effect estimates in our GWAS (binomial P = 9.7 × 10(-7)), five of which reached genome-wide significance. These findings provide strong support for shared BMI loci across populations, as well as for the utility of studying ancestrally diverse populations.
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Progestogens for preterm birth prevention: a systematic review and meta-analysis by drug route.
Arch. Gynecol. Obstet.
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2013
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Progestogen has been investigated as a preventive intervention among women with increased preterm birth risk. Our objective was to systematically review the effectiveness of intramuscular (IM), vaginal, and oral progestogens for preterm birth and neonatal death prevention.
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Genome-wide association analysis of blood-pressure traits in African-ancestry individuals reveals common associated genes in African and non-African populations.
Nora Franceschini, Ervin Fox, Zhaogong Zhang, Todd L Edwards, Michael A Nalls, Yun Ju Sung, Bamidele O Tayo, Yan V Sun, Omri Gottesman, Adebawole Adeyemo, Andrew D Johnson, J Hunter Young, Ken Rice, Qing Duan, Fang Chen, Yun Li, Hua Tang, Myriam Fornage, Keith L Keene, Jeanette S Andrews, Jennifer A Smith, Jessica D Faul, Zhang Guangfa, Wei Guo, Yu Liu, Sarah S Murray, Solomon K Musani, Sathanur Srinivasan, Digna R Velez Edwards, Heming Wang, Lewis C Becker, Pascal Bovet, Murielle Bochud, Ulrich Broeckel, Michel Burnier, Cara Carty, Daniel I Chasman, Georg Ehret, Wei-Min Chen, Guanjie Chen, Wei Chen, Jingzhong Ding, Albert W Dreisbach, Michele K Evans, Xiuqing Guo, Melissa E Garcia, Rich Jensen, Margaux F Keller, Guillaume Lettre, Vaneet Lotay, Lisa W Martin, Jason H Moore, Alanna C Morrison, Thomas H Mosley, Adesola Ogunniyi, Walter Palmas, George Papanicolaou, Alan Penman, Joseph F Polak, Paul M Ridker, Babatunde Salako, Andrew B Singleton, Daniel Shriner, Kent D Taylor, Ramachandran Vasan, Kerri Wiggins, Scott M Williams, Lisa R Yanek, Wei Zhao, Alan B Zonderman, Diane M Becker, Gerald Berenson, Eric Boerwinkle, Erwin Bottinger, Mary Cushman, Charles Eaton, Fredrik Nyberg, Gerardo Heiss, Joel N Hirschhron, Virginia J Howard, Konrad J Karczewsk, Matthew B Lanktree, Kiang Liu, Yongmei Liu, Ruth Loos, Karen Margolis, Michael Snyder, , Bruce M Psaty, Nicholas J Schork, David R Weir, Charles N Rotimi, Michèle M Sale, Tamara Harris, Sharon L R Kardia, Steven C Hunt, Donna Arnett, Susan Redline, Richard S Cooper, Neil J Risch, D C Rao, Jerome I Rotter, Aravinda Chakravarti, Alex P Reiner, Daniel Levy, Brendan J Keating, Xiaofeng Zhu.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2013
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High blood pressure (BP) is more prevalent and contributes to more severe manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in African Americans than in any other United States ethnic group. Several small African-ancestry (AA) BP genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been published, but their findings have failed to replicate to date. We report on a large AA BP GWAS meta-analysis that includes 29,378 individuals from 19 discovery cohorts and subsequent replication in additional samples of AA (n = 10,386), European ancestry (EA) (n = 69,395), and East Asian ancestry (n = 19,601). Five loci (EVX1-HOXA, ULK4, RSPO3, PLEKHG1, and SOX6) reached genome-wide significance (p < 1.0 × 10(-8)) for either systolic or diastolic BP in a transethnic meta-analysis after correction for multiple testing. Three of these BP loci (EVX1-HOXA, RSPO3, and PLEKHG1) lack previous associations with BP. We also identified one independent signal in a known BP locus (SOX6) and provide evidence for fine mapping in four additional validated BP loci. We also demonstrate that validated EA BP GWAS loci, considered jointly, show significant effects in AA samples. Consequently, these findings suggest that BP loci might have universal effects across studied populations, demonstrating that multiethnic samples are an essential component in identifying, fine mapping, and understanding their trait variability.
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Cytokine gene polymorphisms and the outcome of invasive candidiasis: a prospective cohort study.
Clin. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 12-05-2011
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?Candida bloodstream infections cause significant morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients. Although clinical and microbiological factors affecting prognosis have been identified, the impact of genetic variation in the innate immune responses mediated by cytokines on outcomes of infection remains to be studied.
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HTR1B, ADIPOR1, PPARGC1A, and CYP19A1 and obesity in a cohort of Caucasians and African Americans: an evaluation of gene-environment interactions and candidate genes.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-20-2011
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The World Health Organization estimates that the number of obese and overweight adults has increased to 1.6 billion, with concomitant increases in comorbidity. While genetic factors for obesity have been extensively studied in Caucasians, fewer studies have investigated genetic determinants of body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) in African Americans. A total of 38 genes and 1,086 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in African Americans (n = 1,173) and 897 SNPs in Caucasians (n = 1,165) were examined in the Southern Community Cohort Study (2002-2009) for associations with BMI and gene × environment interactions. A statistically significant association with BMI survived correction for multiple testing at rs4140535 (? = -0.04, 95% confidence interval: -0.06, -0.02; P = 5.76 × 10(-5)) in African Americans but not in Caucasians. Gene-environment interactions were observed with cigarette smoking and a SNP in ADIPOR1 in African Americans, as well as between a different SNP in ADIPOR1 and physical activity in Caucasians. A SNP in PPARGC1A interacted with alcohol consumption in African Americans, and a different SNP in PPARGC1A was nominally associated in Caucasians. A SNP in CYP19A1 interacted with dietary energy intake in African Americans, and another SNP in CYP191A had an independent association with BMI in Caucasians.
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Genetic variation in the dectin-1/CARD9 recognition pathway and susceptibility to candidemia.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2011
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Candidemia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients or patients undergoing invasive treatments. Dectin-1 is the main ?-glucan receptor, and patients with a complete deficiency of either dectin-1 or its adaptor molecule CARD9 display persistent mucosal infections with Candida albicans. The role of genetic variation of DECTIN-1 and CARD9 genes on the susceptibility to candidemia is unknown.
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Successful aging shows linkage to chromosomes 6, 7, and 14 in the Amish.
Ann. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2011
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Successful aging (SA) is a multidimensional phenotype involving preservation of cognitive ability, physical function, and social engagement throughout life. Multiple components of SA are heritable, supporting a genetic component. The Amish are genetically and socially isolated with homogeneous lifestyles, making them a suitable population for studying the genetics of SA. DNA and measures of SA were collected on 214 cognitively intact Amish individuals over age 80. Individuals were grouped into a 13-generation pedigree using the Anabaptist Genealogy Database. A linkage screen of 5944 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed using 12 informative subpedigrees with an affected-only 2-point and multipoint linkage analysis. Eleven SNPs produced 2-point LOD scores >2, suggestive of linkage. Multipoint linkage analyses, allowing for heterogeneity, detected significant LOD scores on chromosomes 6 (HLOD = 4.50), 7 (LOD*= 3.11), and 14 (HLOD = 4.17), suggesting multiple new loci underlying SA.
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CD4 intragenic SNPs associate with HIV-2 plasma viral load and CD4 count in a community-based study from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa.
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2011
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The human genetics of HIV-2 infection and disease progression is understudied. Therefore, we studied the effect of variation in 2 genes that encode products critical to HIV pathogenesis and disease progression: CD4 and CD209.
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Interleukin 12B (IL12B) genetic variation and pulmonary tuberculosis: a study of cohorts from The Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, United States and Argentina.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2011
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We examined whether polymorphisms in interleukin-12B (IL12B) associate with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in two West African populations (from The Gambia and Guinea-Bissau) and in two independent populations from North and South America. Nine polymorphisms (seven SNPs, one insertion/deletion, one microsatellite) were analyzed in 321 PTB cases and 346 controls from Guinea-Bissau and 280 PTB cases and 286 controls from The Gambia. For replication we studied 281 case and 179 control African-American samples and 221 cases and 144 controls of European ancestry from the US and Argentina. First-stage single locus analyses revealed signals of association at IL12B 3 UTR SNP rs3212227 (unadjusted allelic p?=?0.04; additive genotypic p?=?0.05, OR?=?0.78, 95% CI [0.61-0.99]) in Guinea-Bissau and rs11574790 (unadjusted allelic p?=?0.05; additive genotypic p?=?0.05, OR?=?0.76, 95% CI [0.58-1.00]) in The Gambia. Association of rs3212227 was then replicated in African-Americans (rs3212227 allelic p?=?0.002; additive genotypic p?=?0.05, OR?=?0.78, 95% CI [0.61-1.00]); most importantly, in the African-American cohort, multiple significant signals of association (seven of the nine polymorphisms tested) were detected throughout the gene. These data suggest that genetic variation in IL12B, a highly relevant candidate gene, is a risk factor for PTB in populations of African ancestry, although further studies will be required to confirm this association and identify the precise mechanism underlying it.
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Report on the 6th African Society of Human Genetics (AfSHG) Meeting, March 12-15, 2009, Yaounde, Cameroon.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2010
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The African Society of Human Genetics (AfSHG), founded in 2003 with its inaugural meeting in Accra, Ghana,1 has the stated missions of (1) disseminating information about human genetics research in Africa, (2) establishing a mentorship network providing educational resources, including the development of appropriate technology transfer, (3) providing advocacy for human genetic research in Africa, and (4) encouraging collaborative research. Despite its young age, the AfSHG has developed a strong cadre of active researchers, both within and outside of Africa, with more than 400 members (from 16 countries across Africa as well as 8 other countries), and has held six successful meetings, five in Africa and one in the United States.
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Association of genetic variants, ethnicity and preterm birth with amniotic fluid cytokine concentrations.
Ann. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2010
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We examined the association of 166 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cytokines and cytokine related genes with cytokine concentrations (IL-1beta, IL-8, and IL-10) in the amniotic fluid (AF). These cytokines have been associated with spontaneous preterm birth (PTB) and their genetic regulation may play a role in disease risk. These associations were studied in both PTB and term births in African Americans and Caucasians; maternal and fetal genotypes were studied separately. Analyses modeled genotype, pregnancy status, and marker by pregnancy status (case/control) interaction with cytokine concentration as outcome. Our results indicate that AF cytokines (IL-1beta and IL-10) were associated with interactions between pregnancy status and both maternal and fetal SNPs, with the most significant interactions being observed for African Americans with IL-1beta concentration (maternal at IL1RAP rs1024941 p < 10(-3), fetal IL1RAP rs3773953 p < 10(-3)). AF IL-10 concentrations also showed evidence for association with SNPs in both ethnicities with the most significant interaction in Caucasian maternal samples (IL10 rs1800896 p < 10(-3)). Our data indicate that the genetic regulation of cytokine concentrations in PTB likely differs by ethnicity. AF cytokine concentrations were associated with interactions between genotype and PTB in African Americans, but less so in Caucasians.
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Inverse association of female hormone replacement therapy with age-related macular degeneration and interactions with ARMS2 polymorphisms.
Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 11-20-2009
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Purpose. To investigate whether female reproductive history and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or birth control pills (BCPs) influence risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and whether genetic factors interact with HRT to modulate AMD risk. Methods. Related and unrelated female participants (n = 799) were examined and data were analyzed with generalized estimating equations with adjustment for age and smoking. Individuals with AMD grades 1 to 2 were considered to be unaffected (n = 239) and those with grades 3 to 5 were considered affected (n = 560). Results. When comparing all cases with controls, significant inverse associations were observed for HRT (odds ratio [OR] = 0.65, 95% CI 0.48-0.90, P = 0.008) and BCPs (OR = 0.60, 95% CI 0.36-0.10, P = 0.048). When analyses were stratified by AMD severity (early versus geographic atrophy versus neovascular), the inverse association remained significant (HRT OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.30-0.66, P < 0.0001; BCP OR = 0.55, 95% CI 0.32-0.96, P = 0.036) only when comparing neovascular AMD with the control. All pair-wise HRT-genotype and BCP-genotype interactions were examined, to determine whether HRT or BCP modifies the effect of established genetic risk factors. The strongest interactions were observed for HRT x ARMS2 coding SNP (R73H) rs10490923 (P = 0.007) and HRT x ARMS2 intronic SNP rs17623531 (P = 0.019). Conclusions. These findings provide the first evidence suggesting that ARMS2 interacts with HRT to modulate AMD risk and are consistent with previous reports demonstrating a protective relationship between exogenous estrogen use and neovascular AMD. These results highlight the genetic and environmental complexity of the etiologic architecture of AMD; however, further replication is necessary to validate them.
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Phenotyping clinical disorders: lessons learned from pelvic organ prolapse.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
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Genetic epidemiology, the study of genetic contributions to risk for disease, is an innovative area in medicine. Although research in this arena has advanced in other disciplines, few genetic epidemiological studies have been conducted in obstetrics and gynecology. It is crucial that we study the genetic susceptibility for issues in womens health because this information will shape the new frontier of personalized medicine. To date, preterm birth may be one of the best examples of genetic susceptibility in obstetrics and gynecology, but many areas are being evaluated including endometriosis, fibroids, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and pelvic floor disorders. An essential component to genetic epidemiological studies is to characterize, or phenotype, the disorder to identify genetic effects. Given the growing importance of genomics and genetic epidemiology, we discuss the importance of accurate phenotyping of clinical disorders and highlight critical considerations and opportunities in phenotyping, using pelvic organ prolapse as a clinical example.
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Gene-environment interactions and obesity traits among postmenopausal African-American and Hispanic women in the Womens Health Initiative SHARe Study.
Hum. Genet.
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of obesity measures have identified associations with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, no large-scale evaluation of gene-environment interactions has been performed. We conducted a search of gene-environment (G × E) interactions in post-menopausal African-American and Hispanic women from the Womens Health Initiative SNP Health Association Resource GWAS study. Single SNP linear regression on body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip circumference ratio (WHR) adjusted for multidimensional-scaling-derived axes of ancestry and age was run in race-stratified data with 871,512 SNPs available from African-Americans (N = 8,203) and 786,776 SNPs from Hispanics (N = 3,484). Tests of G × E interaction at all SNPs for recreational physical activity (m h/week), dietary energy intake (kcal/day), alcohol intake (categorical), cigarette smoking years, and cigarette smoking (ever vs. never) were run in African-Americans and Hispanics adjusted for ancestry and age at interview, followed by meta-analysis of G × E interaction terms. The strongest evidence for concordant G × E interactions in African-Americans and Hispanics was for smoking and marker rs10133840 (Q statistic P = 0.70, beta = -0.01, P = 3.81 × 10(-7)) with BMI as the outcome. The strongest evidence for G × E interaction within a cohort was in African-Americans with WHR as outcome for dietary energy intake and rs9557704 (SNP × kcal = -0.04, P = 2.17 × 10(-7)). No results exceeded the Bonferroni-corrected statistical significance threshold.
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Progestogens for preterm birth prevention: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Obstet Gynecol
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We systematically reviewed the effectiveness of progestogens for prevention of preterm birth among women with prior spontaneous preterm birth, multiple gestations, preterm labor, short cervix, or other indications.
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Periconceptional over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug exposure and risk for spontaneous abortion.
Obstet Gynecol
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To estimate the association between over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) exposure during the early first trimester and risk for spontaneous abortion (gestation before 20 weeks of gestation) in a prospective cohort.
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Genome-wide association and linkage study in the Amish detects a novel candidate late-onset Alzheimer disease gene.
Ann. Hum. Genet.
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To identify novel late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) risk genes, we have analysed Amish populations of Ohio and Indiana. We performed genome-wide SNP linkage and association studies on 798 individuals (109 with LOAD). We tested association using the Modified Quasi-Likelihood Score test and also performed two-point and multipoint linkage analyses. We found that LOAD was significantly associated with APOE (P= 9.0 × 10-6) in all our ascertainment regions except for the Adams County, Indiana, community (P= 0.55). Genome-wide, the most strongly associated SNP was rs12361953 (P= 7.92 × 10-7). A very strong, genome-wide significant multipoint peak [recessive heterogeneity multipoint LOD (HLOD) = 6.14, dominant HLOD = 6.05] was detected on 2p12. Three additional loci with multipoint HLOD scores >3 were detected on 3q26, 9q31 and 18p11. Converging linkage and association results, the most significantly associated SNP under the 2p12 peak was at rs2974151 (P= 1.29 × 10-4). This SNP is located in CTNNA2, which encodes catenin alpha 2, a neuronal-specific catenin known to have function in the developing brain. These results identify CTNNA2 as a novel candidate LOAD gene, and implicate three other regions of the genome as novel LOAD loci. These results underscore the utility of using family-based linkage and association analyses in isolated populations to identify novel loci for traits with complex genetic architecture.
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PTX3 genetic variation and dizygotic twinning in the Gambia: could pleiotropy with innate immunity explain common dizygotic twinning in Africa?
Ann. Hum. Genet.
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Dizygotic (DZ) twinning has a genetic component and is common among sub-Saharan Africans; in The Gambia its frequency is up to 3% of live births. Variation in PTX3, encoding Pentraxin 3, a soluble pattern recognition receptor that plays an important role both in innate immunity and in female fertility, has been associated with resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis pulmonary disease and to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis patients. We tested whether PTX3 variants in Gambian women associate with DZ twinning, by genotyping five PTX3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 130 sister pairs (96 full sibs and 34 half sibs) who had DZ twins. Two, three and five SNP haplotypes differed in frequency between twinning mothers and those without a history of twinning (from P = 0.006 to 3.03e-06 for two SNP and three SNP haplotypes, respectively). Twinning mothers and West African tuberculosis-controls from a previous study shared several frequent haplotypes. Most importantly, our data are consistent with an independently reported association of PTX3 and female fertility in a sample from Ghana. Taken together, these results indicate that selective pressure on PTX3 variants that affect the innate immune response to infectious agents, could also produce the observed high incidence of DZ twinning in Gambians.
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Linkage and association of successful aging to the 6q25 region in large Amish kindreds.
Age (Dordr)
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Successful aging (SA) is a multidimensional phenotype involving living to older age with high physical function, preserved cognition, and continued social engagement. Several domains underlying SA are heritable, and identifying health-promoting polymorphisms and their interactions with the environment could provide important information regarding the health of older adults. In the present study, we examined 263 cognitively intact Amish individuals age 80 and older (74 SA and 189 "normally aged") all of whom are part of a single 13-generation pedigree. A genome-wide association study of 630,309 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed and analyzed for linkage using multipoint analyses and for association using the modified quasi-likelihood score test. There was evidence for linkage on 6q25-27 near the fragile site FRA6E region with a dominant model maximum multipoint heterogeneity LOD score?=?3.2. The 1-LOD-down support interval for this linkage contained one SNP for which there was regionally significant evidence of association (rs205990, p?=?2.36?×?10(-5)). This marker survived interval-wide Bonferroni correction for multiple testing and was located between the genes QKI and PDE10A. Other areas of chromosome 6q25-q27 (including the FRA6E region) contained several SNPs associated with SA (minimum p?=?2.89?×?10(-6)). These findings suggest potentially novel genes in the 6q25-q27 region linked and associated with SA in the Amish; however, these findings should be verified in an independent replication cohort.
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MCP1 SNPs and pulmonary tuberculosis in cohorts from West Africa, the USA and Argentina: lack of association or epistasis with IL12B polymorphisms.
PLoS ONE
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The monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is a chemokine that plays an important role in the recruitment of monocytes to M. tuberculosis infection sites, and previous studies have reported that genetic variants in MCP1 are associated with differential susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). We examined eight MCP1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a multi-ethnic, case-control design that included: 321 cases and 346 controls from Guinea-Bissau, 258 cases and 271 controls from The Gambia, 295 cases and 179 controls from the U.S. (African-Americans), and an additional set of 237 cases and 144 controls of European ancestry from the U.S. and Argentina. Two locus interactions were also examined for polymorphisms in MCP1 and interleukin 12B (IL12B), another gene implicated in PTB risk. Examination of previously associated MCP1 SNPs rs1024611 (-2581A/G), rs2857656 (-362G/C) and rs4586 (+900C/T) did not show evidence for association. One interaction between rs2857656 and IL12B SNP rs2288831 was observed among Africans but the effect was in the opposite direction in Guineans (OR = 1.90, p = 0.001) and Gambians (OR = 0.64, p = 0.024). Our data indicate that the effect of genetic variation within MCP1 is not clear cut and additional studies will be needed to elucidate its role in TB susceptibility.
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Toll-like receptor 1 polymorphisms increase susceptibility to candidemia.
J. Infect. Dis.
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Candidemia is a severe invasive fungal infection with high mortality. Recognition of Candida species is mediated through pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). This study assessed whether genetic variation in TLR signaling influences susceptibility to candidemia.
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