JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Adult lung function and long-term air pollution exposure. ESCAPE: a multicentre cohort study and meta-analysis.
Eur. Respir. J.
PUBLISHED: 09-05-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The chronic impact of ambient air pollutants on lung function in adults is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution with lung function in adult participants from five cohorts in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE). Residential exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2, NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was modelled and traffic indicators were assessed in a standardised manner. The spirometric parameters forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) from 7613 subjects were considered as outcomes. Cohort-specific results were combined using meta-analysis. We did not observe an association of air pollution with longitudinal change in lung function, but we observed that a 10 ?g·m(-3) increase in NO2 exposure was associated with lower levels of FEV1 (-14.0 mL, 95%CI -25.8- -2.1) and FVC (-14.9 mL, 95% CI -28.7- -1.1). An increase of 10 ?g·m(-3) in PM10, but not other PM metrics (PM2.5, coarse fraction of PM, PM absorbance), was associated with a lower level of FEV1 (-44.6 mL, 95% CI -85.4- -3.8) and FVC (-59.0 mL, 95% CI -112.3- -5.6). The associations were particularly strong in obese persons. This study adds to the evidence for an adverse association of ambient air pollution with lung function in adults at very low levels in Europe.
Related JoVE Video
Association of ambient air pollution with the prevalence and incidence of COPD.
Eur. Respir. J.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The role of air pollution in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains uncertain. The aim was to assess the impact of chronic exposure to air pollution on COPD in four cohorts using the standardised ESCAPE exposure estimates. Annual average particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and road traffic exposure were assigned to home addresses using land-use regression models. COPD was defined by NHANES reference equation (forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) less than the lower limit of normal) and the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease criterion (FEV1/FVC <0.70) and categorised by severity in non-asthmatics. We included 6550 subjects with assigned NOx and 3692 with PM measures. COPD was not associated with NO2 or PM10 in any individual cohort. In meta-analyses only NO2, NOx, PM10 and the traffic indicators were positively, although not significantly, associated with COPD. The only statistically significant associations were seen in females (COPD prevalence using GOLD: OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.11-2.23; and incidence: OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.21-2.68). None of the principal results were statistically significant, the weak positive associations of exposure with COPD and the significant subgroup findings need to be evaluated in further well standardised cohorts followed up for longer time, and with time-matched exposure assignments.
Related JoVE Video
Follow-up on genome-wide main effects: do polymorphisms modify the air pollution effect on lung function decline in adults?
Environ Int
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Improved air quality has been found associated with attenuated age-related decline in lung function. But whether genetic polymorphisms strongly associated with lung function play a modifying role in this attenuation process has so far not been investigated. We selected ten single nucleotide polymorphisms derived from the largest genome-wide association studies on lung function and examined whether they modified the association between the change in exposure to particulate matter ?10?m (?PM10) and lung function decline. 4310 participants from the SAPALDIA cohort provided valid spirometry measurements, a detailed pulmonary health questionnaire both at baseline and 11years later as well as blood samples for genetic testing. Spatially and temporally resolved air pollution exposures were assigned on an individual level based on participants' residences. Statistically significant interactions of moderate strength with ?PM10 were detected for rs2284746. Individuals with the CC genotype had a 21ml slower annual decline of the mid expiratory flow per 10?g/m(3) PM10 reduction over an 10-year period, while the benefits of CG and GG carriers were smaller (14 and 7ml per year, respectively; Pinteraction=0.04). The attenuated annual decline in the percentage of the forced expiratory volume in one second relative to the forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) was also increased with the presence of each C-allele (Pinteraction=0.009). We observed further suggestive interactions of similar magnitude in never-smokers, but none of the results would remain statistically significant after correction for multiple testing. We could not find strong evidence that lung function benefits from improved air quality are modified by polymorphisms associated with lung function level in large meta-analyzed genome-wide association studies.
Related JoVE Video
Transportation noise and blood pressure in a population-based sample of adults.
Environ. Health Perspect.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
There is some evidence for an association between traffic noise and ischemic heart disease; however, associations with blood pressure have been inconsistent, and little is known about health effects of railway noise.
Related JoVE Video
Metalworking exposures and persistent skin symptoms in the ECRHS II and SAPALDIA 2 cohorts.
Contact Derm.
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Diseases of the skin are important and often preventable conditions occurring among workers with dermal exposures to irritant and sensitizing agents.
Related JoVE Video
Improvements in PM10 exposure and reduced rates of respiratory symptoms in a cohort of Swiss adults (SAPALDIA).
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Reductions in mortality following improvements in air quality were documented by several studies, and our group found, in an earlier analysis, that decreasing particulate levels attenuate lung function decline in adults.
Related JoVE Video
Development of Land Use Regression models for PM(2.5), PM(2.5) absorbance, PM(10) and PM(coarse) in 20 European study areas; results of the ESCAPE project.
Environ. Sci. Technol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Land Use Regression (LUR) models have been used increasingly for modeling small-scale spatial variation in air pollution concentrations and estimating individual exposure for participants of cohort studies. Within the ESCAPE project, concentrations of PM(2.5), PM(2.5) absorbance, PM(10), and PM(coarse) were measured in 20 European study areas at 20 sites per area. GIS-derived predictor variables (e.g., traffic intensity, population, and land-use) were evaluated to model spatial variation of annual average concentrations for each study area. The median model explained variance (R(2)) was 71% for PM(2.5) (range across study areas 35-94%). Model R(2) was higher for PM(2.5) absorbance (median 89%, range 56-97%) and lower for PM(coarse) (median 68%, range 32- 81%). Models included between two and five predictor variables, with various traffic indicators as the most common predictors. Lower R(2) was related to small concentration variability or limited availability of predictor variables, especially traffic intensity. Cross validation R(2) results were on average 8-11% lower than model R(2). Careful selection of monitoring sites, examination of influential observations and skewed variable distributions were essential for developing stable LUR models. The final LUR models are used to estimate air pollution concentrations at the home addresses of participants in the health studies involved in ESCAPE.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.