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EVpedia: A Community Web Portal for Extracellular Vesicles Research.
Dae-Kyum Kim, Jaewook Lee, Sae Rom Kim, Dong-Sic Choi, Yae Jin Yoon, Ji Hyun Kim, Gyeongyun Go, Dinh Nhung, Kahye Hong, Su Chul Jang, Si-Hyun Kim, Kyong-Su Park, Oh Youn Kim, Hyun Taek Park, Ji Hye Seo, Elena Aikawa, Monika Baj-Krzyworzeka, Bas W M van Balkom, Mattias Belting, Lionel Blanc, Vincent Bond, Antonella Bongiovanni, Francesc E Borràs, Luc Buée, Edit I Buzás, Lesley Cheng, Aled Clayton, Emanuele Cocucci, Charles S Dela Cruz, Dominic M Desiderio, Dolores Di Vizio, Karin Ekström, Juan M Falcon-Perez, Chris Gardiner, Bernd Giebel, David W Greening, Julia Christina Gross, Dwijendra Gupta, An Hendrix, Andrew F Hill, Michelle M Hill, Esther Nolte-'t Hoen, Do Won Hwang, Jameel Inal, Medicharla V Jagannadham, Muthuvel Jayachandran, Young-Koo Jee, Malene Jørgensen, Kwang Pyo Kim, Yoon-Keun Kim, Thomas Kislinger, Cecilia Lässer, Dong Soo Lee, Hakmo Lee, Johannes van Leeuwen, Thomas Lener, Ming-Lin Liu, Jan Lötvall, Antonio Marcilla, Suresh Mathivanan, Andreas Möller, Jess Morhayim, François Mullier, Irina Nazarenko, Rienk Nieuwland, Diana N Nunes, Ken Pang, Jaesung Park, Tushar Patel, Gabriella Pocsfalvi, Hernando Del Portillo, Ulrich Putz, Marcel I Ramirez, Marcio L Rodrigues, Tae-Young Roh, Felix Royo, Susmita Sahoo, Raymond Schiffelers, Shivani Sharma, Pia Siljander, Richard J Simpson, Carolina Soekmadji, Philip Stahl, Allan Stensballe, Ewa Stępień, Hidetoshi Tahara, Arne Trummer, Hadi Valadi, Laura J Vella, Sun Nyunt Wai, Kenneth Witwer, María Yáñez-Mó, Hyewon Youn, Reinhard Zeidler, Yong Song Gho.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 11-13-2014
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Extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for extracellular vesicle-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging.
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In vivo Kinetic Biodistribution of Nano-Sized Outer Membrane Vesicles Derived from Bacteria.
Small
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2014
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Evaluation of kinetic distribution and behaviors of nanoparticles in vivo provides crucial clues into their roles in living organisms. Extracellular vesicles are evolutionary conserved nanoparticles, known to play important biological functions in intercellular, inter-species, and inter-kingdom communication. In this study, the first kinetic analysis of the biodistribution of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs)-bacterial extracellular vesicles-with immune-modulatory functions is performed. OMVs, injected intraperitoneally, spread to the whole mouse body and accumulate in the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney within 3 h of administration. As an early systemic inflammation response, increased levels of TNF-? and IL-6 are observed in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, the number of leukocytes and platelets in the blood is decreased. OMVs and cytokine concentrations, as well as body temperature are gradually decreased 6 h after OMV injection, in concomitance with the formation of eye exudates, and of an increase in ICAM-1 levels in the lung. Following OMV elimination, most of the inflammatory signs are reverted, 12 h post-injection. However, leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid are increased as a late reaction. Taken together, these results suggest that OMVs are effective mediators of long distance communication in vivo.
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Biology and proteomics of extracellular vesicles: harnessing their clinical potential.
Expert Rev Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2014
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Extracellular membrane vesicles have recently emerged as versatile mediators of intercellular communication, pathogenesis, drug and gene delivery and as potentially rich reservoirs of clinical biomarkers. Channeling their properties toward patient care is dependent on technological progress in approaches used for their analysis and molecular profiling.
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Enhanced shedding of extracellular vesicles from amoeboid prostate cancer cells: potential effects on the tumor microenvironment.
Cancer Biol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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The gene encoding the cytoskeletal regulator DIAPH3 is lost at high frequency in metastatic prostate cancer, and DIAPH3 silencing evokes a transition to an amoeboid tumor phenotype in multiple cell backgrounds. This amoeboid transformation is accompanied by increased tumor cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. DIAPH3 silencing also promotes the formation of atypically large (> 1 ?m) membrane blebs that can be shed as extracellular vesicles (EV) containing bioactive cargo. Whether loss of DIAPH3 also stimulates the release of nano-sized EV (e.g., exosomes) is not established. Here we examined the mechanism of release and potential biological functions of EV shed from DIAPH3-silenced and other prostate cancer cells. We observed that stimulation of LNCaP cells with the prostate stroma-derived growth factor heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), combined with p38MAPK inhibition caused EV shedding, a process mediated by ERK1/2 hyperactivation. DIAPH3 silencing in DU145 cells also increased rates of EV production. EV isolated from DIAPH3-silenced cells activated AKT1 and androgen signaling, increased proliferation of recipient tumor cells, and suppressed proliferation of human macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. DU145 EV contained miR-125a, which suppressed AKT1 expression and proliferation in recipient human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages. Our findings suggest that EV produced as a result of DIAPH3 loss or growth factor stimulation may condition the tumor microenvironment through multiple mechanisms, including the proliferation of cancer cells and suppression of tumor-infiltrating immune cells.
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Large oncosomes mediate intercellular transfer of functional microRNA.
Cell Cycle
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2013
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Prostate cancer cells release atypically large extracellular vesicles (EVs), termed large oncosomes, which may play a role in the tumor microenvironment by transporting bioactive molecules across tissue spaces and through the blood stream. In this study, we applied a novel method for selective isolation of large oncosomes applicable to human platelet-poor plasma, where the presence of caveolin-1-positive large oncosomes identified patients with metastatic disease. This procedure was also used to validate results of a miRNA array performed on heterogeneous populations of EVs isolated from tumorigenic RWPE-2 prostate cells and from isogenic non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 cells. The results showed that distinct classes of miRNAs are expressed at higher levels in EVs derived from the tumorigenic cells in comparison to their non-tumorigenic counterpart. Large oncosomes enhanced migration of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), an effect that was increased by miR-1227, a miRNA abundant in large oncosomes produced by RWPE-2 cells. Our findings suggest that large oncosomes in the circulation report metastatic disease in patients with prostate cancer, and that this class of EV harbors functional molecules that may play a role in conditioning the tumor microenvironment.
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Bladder tissue regeneration using acellular bi-layer silk scaffolds in a large animal model of augmentation cystoplasty.
Biomaterials
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2013
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Acellular scaffolds derived from Bombyx mori silk fibroin were investigated for their ability to support functional tissue regeneration in a porcine model of augmentation cystoplasty. Two bi-layer matrix configurations were fabricated by solvent-casting/salt leaching either alone (Group 1) or in combination with silk film casting (Group 2) to yield porous foams buttressed by heterogeneous surface pore occlusions or homogenous silk films, respectively. Bladder augmentation was performed with each scaffold group (6 × 6 cm(2)) in juvenile Yorkshire swine for 3 m of implantation. Augmented animals exhibited high rates of survival (Group 1: 5/6, 83%; Group 2: 4/4, 100%) and voluntary voiding over the course of the study period. Urodynamic evaluations demonstrated mean increases in bladder capacity over pre-operative levels (Group 1: 277%; Group 2: 153%) which exceeded nonsurgical control gains (144%) encountered due to animal growth. Similarly, elevations in bladder compliance were substantially higher in augmented animals from baseline (Group 1: 357%; Group 2: 147%) in comparison to controls (41%). Gross tissue evaluations revealed that both matrix configurations supported extensive de novo tissue formation throughout the entire original implantation site which exhibited ultimate tensile strength similar to nonsurgical counterparts. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses showed that both implant groups promoted comparable extents of smooth muscle regeneration and contractile protein (?-smooth muscle actin and SM22?) expression within defect sites similar to controls. Parallel evaluations demonstrated the formation of a transitional, multi-layered urothelium with prominent cytokeratin, uroplakin, and p63 protein expression in both matrix groups. De novo innervation and vascularization processes were evident in all regenerated tissues indicated by synaptophysin-positive neuronal cells and vessels lined with CD31 expressing endothelial cells. Ex vivo organ bath studies demonstrated that regenerated tissues supported by both silk matrices displayed contractile responses to carbachol, ?,?-methylene-ATP, KCl, and electrical field stimulation similar to controls. Our data detail the ability of acellular silk scaffolds to support regeneration of innervated, vascularized smooth muscle and urothelial tissues within 3 m with structural, mechanical, and functional properties comparable to native tissue in a porcine model of bladder repair.
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Loss of caveolin-1 in prostate cancer stroma correlates with reduced relapse-free survival and is functionally relevant to tumour progression.
J. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2013
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Levels of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in tumour epithelial cells increase during prostate cancer progression. Conversely, Cav-1 expression in the stroma can decline in advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. In a large cohort of 724 prostate cancers, we observed significantly decreased levels of stromal Cav-1 in concordance with increased Gleason score (p = 0.012). Importantly, reduced expression of Cav-1 in the stroma correlated with reduced relapse-free survival (p = 0.009), suggesting a role for stromal Cav-1 in inhibiting advanced disease. Silencing of Cav-1 by shRNA in WPMY-1 prostate fibroblasts resulted in up-regulation of Akt phosphorylation, and significantly altered expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis, including a > 2.5-fold increase in TGF-?1 and ?-synuclein (SNCG) gene expression. Moreover, silencing of Cav-1 induced migration of prostate cancer cells when stromal cells were used as attractants. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt caused down-regulation of TGF-?1 and SNCG, suggesting that loss of Cav-1 in the stroma can influence Akt-mediated signalling in the tumour microenvironment. Cav-1-depleted stromal cells exhibited increased levels of intracellular cholesterol, a precursor for androgen biosynthesis, steroidogenic enzymes, and testosterone. These findings suggest that loss of Cav-1 in the tumour microenvironment contributes to the metastatic behaviour of tumour cells by a mechanism that involves up-regulation of TGF-?1 and SNCG through Akt activation. They also suggest that intracrine production of androgens, a process relevant to castration resistance, may occur in the stroma.
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The impact of discrete modes of spinal cord injury on bladder muscle contractility.
BMC Urol
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2013
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Prior studies have compared the effect of spinal cord injury elicited using distinct approaches on motor and visceral function. However, the impact of such discrete modes of injury specifically on bladder muscle contractility has not been explored in detail. The goal of this study is to compare the impact of complete spinal cord transection versus clip compression at thoracic vertebra eight (T8) on bladder muscle contractility.
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Loss of Sh3gl2/endophilin A1 is a common event in urothelial carcinoma that promotes malignant behavior.
Neoplasia
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2013
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Urothelial carcinoma (UC) causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying urothelial cancer development and tumor progression are still largely unknown. Using informatics analysis, we identified Sh3gl2 (endophilin A1) as a bladder urothelium-enriched transcript. The gene encoding Sh3gl2 is located on chromosome 9p, a region frequently altered in UC. Sh3gl2 is known to regulate endocytosis of receptor tyrosine kinases implicated in oncogenesis, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-Met. However, its role in UC pathogenesis is unknown. Informatics analysis of expression profiles as well as immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays revealed Sh3gl2 expression to be decreased in UC specimens compared to nontumor tissues. Loss of Sh3gl2 was associated with increasing tumor grade and with muscle invasion, which is a reliable predictor of metastatic disease and cancer-derived mortality. Sh3gl2 expression was undetectable in 19 of 20 human UC cell lines but preserved in the low-grade cell line RT4. Stable silencing of Sh3gl2 in RT4 cells by RNA interference 1) enhanced proliferation and colony formation in vitro, 2) inhibited EGF-induced EGFR internalization and increased EGFR activation, 3) stimulated phosphorylation of Src family kinases and STAT3, and 4) promoted growth of RT4 xenografts in subrenal capsule tissue recombination experiments. Conversely, forced re-expression of Sh3gl2 in T24 cells and silenced RT4 clones attenuated oncogenic behaviors, including growth and migration. Together, these findings identify loss of Sh3gl2 as a frequent event in UC development that promotes disease progression.
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The performance of silk scaffolds in a rat model of augmentation cystoplasty.
Biomaterials
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2013
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The diverse processing plasticity of silk-based biomaterials offers a versatile platform for understanding the impact of structural and mechanical matrix properties on bladder regenerative processes. Three distinct groups of 3-D matrices were fabricated from aqueous solutions of Bombyx mori silk fibroin either by a gel spinning technique (GS1 and GS2 groups) or a solvent-casting/salt-leaching method in combination with silk film casting (FF group). SEM analyses revealed that GS1 matrices consisted of smooth, compact multi-laminates of parallel-oriented silk fibers while GS2 scaffolds were composed of porous (pore size range, 5-50 ?m) lamellar-like sheets buttressed by a dense outer layer. Bi-layer FF scaffolds were comprised of porous foams (pore size, ~400 ?m) fused on their external face with a homogenous, nonporous silk film. Silk groups and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) matrices were evaluated in a rat model of augmentation cystoplasty for 10 weeks of implantation and compared to cystotomy controls. Gross tissue evaluations revealed the presence of intra-luminal stones in all experimental groups. The incidence and size of urinary calculi was the highest in animals implanted with gel spun silk matrices and SIS with frequencies ?57% and stone diameters of 3-4 mm. In contrast, rats augmented with FF scaffolds displayed substantially lower rates (20%) and stone size (2 mm), similar to the levels observed in controls (13%, 2 mm). Histological (hematoxylin and eosin, Massons trichrome) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses showed comparable extents of smooth muscle regeneration and contractile protein (?-smooth muscle actin and SM22?) expression within defect sites supported by all matrix groups similar to controls. Parallel evaluations demonstrated the formation of a transitional, multi-layered urothelium with prominent uroplakin and p63 protein expression in all experimental groups. De novo innervation and vascularization processes were evident in all regenerated tissues indicated by Fox3-positive neuronal cells and vessels lined with CD31 expressing endothelial cells. In comparison to other biomaterial groups, cystometric analyses at 10 weeks post-op revealed that animals implanted with the FF matrix configuration displayed superior urodynamic characteristics including compliance, functional capacity, as well as spontaneous non voiding contractions consistent with control levels. Our data demonstrate that variations in scaffold processing techniques can influence the in vivo functional performance of silk matrices in bladder reconstructive procedures.
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PKM2 isoform-specific deletion reveals a differential requirement for pyruvate kinase in tumor cells.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2013
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The pyruvate kinase M2 isoform (PKM2) is expressed in cancer and plays a role in regulating anabolic metabolism. To determine whether PKM2 is required for tumor formation or growth, we generated mice with a conditional allele that abolishes PKM2 expression without disrupting PKM1 expression. PKM2 deletion accelerated mammary tumor formation in a Brca1-loss-driven model of breast cancer. PKM2 null tumors displayed heterogeneous PKM1 expression, with PKM1 found in nonproliferating tumor cells and no detectable pyruvate kinase expression in proliferating cells. This suggests that PKM2 is not necessary for tumor cell proliferation and implies that the inactive state of PKM2 is associated with the proliferating cell population within tumors, whereas nonproliferating tumor cells require active pyruvate kinase. Consistent with these findings, variable PKM2 expression and heterozygous PKM2 mutations are found in human tumors. These data suggest that regulation of PKM2 activity supports the different metabolic requirements of proliferating and nonproliferating tumor cells.
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A metabolic perturbation by U0126 identifies a role for glutamine in resveratrol-induced cell death.
Cancer Biol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2011
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Recent evidence has identified substantial overlap between metabolic and oncogenic biochemical pathways, suggesting novel approaches to cancer intervention. For example, cholesterol lowering statins and the antidiabetes medication metformin both act as chemopreventive agents in prostate and other cancers. The natural compound resveratrol has similar properties: increasing insulin sensitivity, suppressing adipogenesis, and inducing apoptotic death of cancer cells in vitro. However, in vivo tumor xenografts acquire resistance to resveratrol by an unknown mechanism, while mouse models of metabolic disorders respond more consistently to the compound. Here we demonstrate that castration-resistant human prostate cancer C4-2 cells are more sensitive to resveratrol-induced apoptosis than isogenic androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. The MEK inhibitor U0126 antagonized resveratrol-induced apoptosis in C4-2 cells, but this effect was not seen with other MEK inhibitors. U0126 was found to inhibit mitochondrial function and shift cells to aerobic glycolysis independently of MEK. Mitochondrial activity of U0126 arose through decomposition, producing both mitochondrial fluorescence and cyanide, a known inhibitor of complex IV. Applying U0126 mitochondrial inhibition to C4-2 cell apoptosis, we tested the possibility that glutamine supplementation of citric acid cycle intermediate ?-ketoglutarate may be involved. Suppression of the conversion of glutamate to ?-ketoglutarate antagonized resveratrol-induced death in C4-2 cells. A similar effect was also seen by reducing extracellular glutamine concentration in the culture medium, suggesting that resveratrol-induced death is dependent on glutamine metabolism, a process frequently dysregulated in cancer. Further work on resveratrol and metabolism in cancer is warranted to ascertain if the glutamine dependence has clinical implications.
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The effect of manipulation of silk scaffold fabrication parameters on matrix performance in a murine model of bladder augmentation.
Biomaterials
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2011
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Autologous gastrointestinal segments are utilized as the primary option for bladder reconstructive procedures despite their inherent morbidity and significant complication rate. Multi-laminate biomaterials derived from Bombyx mori silk fibroin and prepared from a gel spinning process may serve as a superior alternative for bladder tissue engineering due to their robust mechanical properties, biocompatibility, and processing plasticity. In the present study, we sought to determine the impact of variations in winding (axial slew rate: 2 and 40 mm/s) and post-winding (methanol and lyophilization) fabrication parameters on the in vivo performance of gel spun silk scaffolds in a murine model of bladder augmentation. Three silk matrix groups with distinct structural and mechanical properties were investigated following 10 weeks of implantation including our original prototype previously shown to support bladder regeneration, Group 1 (2 mm/s, methanol) as well as Group 2 (40 mm/s, methanol) and Group 3 (40 mm/s, lyophilization) configurations. Non surgical animals were assessed in parallel as controls. Quantification of residual scaffold area demonstrated that while Group 1 and 2 scaffolds were largely intact, processing parameters utilized for Group 3 led to significantly higher degrees of scaffold degradation in comparison to Group 1. Histological (hematoxylin and eosin, massons trichrome) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses showed comparable extents of smooth muscle regeneration and contractile protein (?-smooth muscle actin and SM22?) expression within the original defect site throughout all matrix groups similar to controls. Parallel evaluations demonstrated transitional urothelial formation with prominent uroplakin and p63 protein expression supported by Group 1 and 3 scaffolds, while Group 2 variants supported a thin, immature epithelium composed primarily of uroplakin-negative, p63-positive basal cells. Voided stain on paper analysis revealed similar voiding patterns between all matrix groups; however Group 2 animals displayed substantially lower voided volumes with increased frequency in comparison to controls. In addition, cystometric assessments revealed all matrix groups supported comparable degrees of bladder compliance similar to control levels. The results of this study demonstrate that selective alterations in winding and post-winding fabrication parameters can enhance the degradation rate of gel spun silk scaffolds in vivo while preserving their ability to support bladder tissue regeneration and function.
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Ezetimibe reduces enlarged prostate in an animal model of benign prostatic hyperplasia.
J. Urol.
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2010
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Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a common urinary tract disorder that affects aging men. The molecular mechanisms underlying benign prostatic hyperplasia are obscure and the development of animal models to test novel treatment strategies is challenging. We report that the Bio 87.20 hamster strain (Bio Breeders, Watertown, Massachusetts) shows 5?-reductase-sensitive prostate enlargement and a decrease in circulating cholesterol reduces prostate size.
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Evaluation of gel spun silk-based biomaterials in a murine model of bladder augmentation.
Biomaterials
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2010
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Currently, gastrointestinal segments are considered the gold standard for bladder reconstructive procedures. However, significant complications including chronic urinary tract infection, metabolic abnormalities, urinary stone formation, bowel dysfunction, and secondary malignancies are associated with this approach. Biomaterials derived from silk fibroin may represent a superior alternative due their robust mechanical properties, biodegradable features, and processing plasticity. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of a gel spun silk-based matrix for bladder augmentation in a murine model. Over the course of 70 d implantation period, H&E and Massons trichrome (MTS) analysis revealed that silk matrices were capable of supporting both urothelial and smooth muscle regeneration at the defect site. Prominent uroplakin and contractile protein expression (?-actin, calponin, and SM22?) was evident by immunohistochemical analysis demonstrating maturation of the reconstituted bladder wall compartments. Gel spun silk matrices also elicited a minimal acute inflammatory reaction following 70 d of bladder integration, in contrast to parallel assessments of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) and poly-glycolic acid (PGA) matrices which routinely promoted evidence of fibrosis and chronic inflammatory responses. Voided stain on paper analysis revealed that silk augmented animals displayed similar voiding patterns in comparison to non surgical controls by 42 d of implantation. In addition, cystometric evaluations of augmented bladders at 70 d post-op demonstrated that silk scaffolds supported significant increases in bladder capacity and voided volume while maintaining similar degrees of compliance relative to the control group. These results provide evidence for the utility of gel spun silk-based matrices for functional bladder tissue engineering applications.
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Proteome scale characterization of human S-acylated proteins in lipid raft-enriched and non-raft membranes.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2009
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Protein S-acylation (palmitoylation), a reversible post-translational modification, is critically involved in regulating protein subcellular localization, activity, stability, and multimeric complex assembly. However, proteome scale characterization of S-acylation has lagged far behind that of phosphorylation, and global analysis of the localization of S-acylated proteins within different membrane domains has not been reported. Here we describe a novel proteomics approach, designated palmitoyl protein identification and site characterization (PalmPISC), for proteome scale enrichment and characterization of S-acylated proteins extracted from lipid raft-enriched and non-raft membranes. In combination with label-free spectral counting quantitation, PalmPISC led to the identification of 67 known and 331 novel candidate S-acylated proteins as well as the localization of 25 known and 143 novel candidate S-acylation sites. Palmitoyl acyltransferases DHHC5, DHHC6, and DHHC8 appear to be S-acylated on three cysteine residues within a novel CCX(7-13)C(S/T) motif downstream of a conserved Asp-His-His-Cys cysteine-rich domain, which may be a potential mechanism for regulating acyltransferase specificity and/or activity. S-Acylation may tether cytoplasmic acyl-protein thioesterase-1 to membranes, thus facilitating its interaction with and deacylation of membrane-associated S-acylated proteins. Our findings also suggest that certain ribosomal proteins may be targeted to lipid rafts via S-acylation, possibly to facilitate regulation of ribosomal protein activity and/or dynamic synthesis of lipid raft proteins in situ. In addition, bioinformatics analysis suggested that S-acylated proteins are highly enriched within core complexes of caveolae and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, both cholesterol-rich membrane structures. The PalmPISC approach and the large scale human S-acylated protein data set are expected to provide powerful tools to facilitate our understanding of the functions and mechanisms of protein S-acylation.
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An absence of stromal caveolin-1 is associated with advanced prostate cancer, metastatic disease and epithelial Akt activation.
Cell Cycle
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2009
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Here, we examined the status of stromal Cav-1 expression in patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), primary prostate cancers (PCa), and prostate-cancer metastases (Mets). Interestingly, an absence of stromal Cav-1 directly correlated with prostate cancer disease progression. For example, virtually all BPH samples showed abundant stromal Cav-1 immunostaining. In contrast, in a subset of patients with primary prostate cancer, the stromal levels of Cav-1 were significantly decreased, and this correlated with a high Gleason score, indicative of a worse prognosis and poor clinical outcome. Remarkably, all metastatic tumors (either from lymph node or bone) were completely negative for stromal Cav-1 staining. Thus, stromal Cav-1 expression may be considered as a new biomarker of prostate cancer disease progression and metastasis. Mechanistically, stromal Cav-1 levels were inversely correlated with the epithelial expression levels of Cav-1 and epithelial phospho-Akt. Thus, loss of stromal Cav-1 is predictive of elevated levels of epithelial Cav-1 and epithelial Akt-activation. This provides important new clinical evidence for paracrine signaling between prostate cancer epithelial cells and the tumor stromal micro-environment, especially related to disease progression and metastasis.
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Oncosome formation in prostate cancer: association with a region of frequent chromosomal deletion in metastatic disease.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2009
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Oncosomes have recently been described as membrane-derived microvesicles secreted by cancer cells, which transfer oncogenic signals and protein complexes across cell boundaries. Here, we show the rapid formation and secretion of oncosomes from DU145 and LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. Oncosome formation was stimulated by epidermal growth factor receptor activation and also by overexpression of membrane-targeted Akt1. Microvesicles shed from prostate cancer cells contained numerous signal transduction proteins and were capable of activating rapid phospho-tyrosine and Akt pathway signaling, and stimulating proliferation and migration, in recipient tumor cells. They also induced a stromal reaction in recipient normal cells. Knockdown of the actin nucleating protein Diaphanous Related Formin 3 (DRF3/Dia2) by RNA interference enhanced rates of oncosome formation, indicating that these structures resemble, and may be identical to, nonapoptotic membrane blebs, a feature of the amoeboid form of cell motility. Analysis of primary and metastatic human prostate tumors using 100K single nucleotide polymorphism arrays revealed a significantly higher frequency of deletion of the locus encoding DRF3 (DIAPH3) in metastatic tumors (P = 0.001) in comparison with organ-confined tumors. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed increased chromosomal loss of DIAPH3 in metastatic tumors in a different cohort of patients (P = 0.006). These data suggest that microvesicles shed from prostate cancer cells can alter the tumor microenvironment in a manner that may promote disease progression. They also show that DRF3 is a physiologically relevant protein that seems to regulate this process.
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Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K is a novel regulator of androgen receptor translation.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2009
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The regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression in prostate cancer is still poorly understood. The activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in prostate cancer cells was previously shown to lower AR expression by a rapamycin-sensitive, posttranscriptional mechanism involving the AR mRNA 5-untranslated region (5-UTR). In a search for an intermediate within the EGFR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway that regulates AR at this site, we identified the nucleic acid-binding protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP-K), by mass spectrometric analysis of Akt immune complexes from lipid raft-enriched subcellular fractions. We show here that hnRNP-K is a novel inhibitor of AR mRNA translation that regulates androgen-responsive gene expression and prostate cancer cell proliferation. A functional hnRNP-K binding site involved in down-regulating AR protein levels was identified in the AR mRNA 5-UTR. Further analysis revealed that hnRNP-K is also able to inhibit AR translation in the absence of the 5-UTR, consistent with the presence of additional predicted hnRNP-K binding sites within the AR open reading frame and in the 3-UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of a human prostate cancer tissue microarray revealed an inverse correlation between hnRNP-K expression and AR protein levels in organ-confined prostate tumors and a substantial decline in cytoplasmic hnRNP-K in metastases, despite an overall increase in hnRNP-K levels in metastatic tumors. These data suggest that translational inhibition of AR by hnRNP-K may occur in organ-confined tumors but possibly at a reduced level in metastases. HnRNP-K is the first protein identified that directly interacts with and regulates the AR translational apparatus.
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Large oncosomes in human prostate cancer tissues and in the circulation of mice with metastatic disease.
Am. J. Pathol.
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Oncosomes are tumor-derived microvesicles that transmit signaling complexes between cell and tissue compartments. Herein, we show that amoeboid tumor cells export large (1- to 10-?m diameter) vesicles, derived from bulky cellular protrusions, that contain metalloproteinases, RNA, caveolin-1, and the GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6, and are biologically active toward tumor cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. We describe methods by which large oncosomes can be selectively sorted by flow cytometry and analyzed independently of vesicles <1 ?m. Structures resembling large oncosomes were identified in the circulation of different mouse models of prostate cancer, and their abundance correlated with tumor progression. Similar large vesicles were also identified in human tumor tissues, but they were not detected in the benign compartment. They were more abundant in metastases. Our results suggest that tumor microvesicles substantially larger than exosome-sized particles can be visualized and quantified in tissues and in the circulation, and isolated and characterized using clinically adaptable methods. These findings also suggest a mechanism by which migrating tumor cells condition the tumor microenvironment and distant sites, thereby potentiating advanced disease.
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The response of the prostate to circulating cholesterol: activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) as a prominent node in a cholesterol-sensing network.
PLoS ONE
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Elevated circulating cholesterol is a systemic risk factor for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, however the manner in which the normal prostate responds to variations in cholesterol levels is poorly understood. In this study we addressed the molecular and cellular effects of elevated and suppressed levels of circulating cholesterol on the normal prostate. Integrated bioinformatic analysis was performed using DNA microarray data from two experimental formats: (1) ventral prostate from male mice with chronically elevated circulating cholesterol and (2) human prostate cells exposed acutely to cholesterol depletion. A cholesterol-sensitive gene expression network was constructed from these data and the transcription factor ATF3 was identified as a prominent node in the network. Validation experiments confirmed that elevated cholesterol reduced ATF3 expression and enhanced proliferation of prostate cells, while cholesterol depletion increased ATF3 levels and inhibited proliferation. Cholesterol reduction in vivo alleviated dense lymphomononuclear infiltrates in the periprostatic adipose tissue, which were closely associated with nerve tracts and blood vessels. These findings open new perspectives on the role of cholesterol in prostate health, and provide a novel role for ATF3, and associated proteins within a large signaling network, as a cholesterol-sensing mechanism.
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DIAPH3 governs the cellular transition to the amoeboid tumour phenotype.
EMBO Mol Med
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Therapies for most malignancies are generally ineffective once metastasis occurs. While tumour cells migrate through tissues using diverse strategies, the signalling networks controlling such behaviours in human tumours are poorly understood. Here we define a role for the Diaphanous-related formin-3 (DIAPH3) as a non-canonical regulator of metastasis that restrains conversion to amoeboid cell behaviour in multiple cancer types. The DIAPH3 locus is close to RB1, within a narrow consensus region of deletion on chromosome 13q in prostate, breast and hepatocellular carcinomas. DIAPH3 silencing in human carcinoma cells destabilized microtubules and induced defective endocytic trafficking, endosomal accumulation of EGFR, and hyperactivation of EGFR/MEK/ERK signalling. Silencing also evoked amoeboid properties, increased invasion and promoted metastasis in mice. In human tumours, DIAPH3 down-regulation was associated with aggressive or metastatic disease. DIAPH3-silenced cells were sensitive to MEK inhibition, but showed reduced sensitivity to EGFR inhibition. These findings have implications for understanding mechanisms of metastasis, and suggest that identifying patients with chromosomal deletions at DIAPH3 may have prognostic value.
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Caveolin-1 and prostate cancer progression.
Adv. Exp. Med. Biol.
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Caveolin-1 was identified in the 1990s as a marker of aggressive prostate cancer. The caveolin-1 protein localizes to vesicular structures called caveolae and has been shown to bind and regulate many signaling proteins involved in oncogenesis. Caveolin-1 also has lipid binding properties and mediates aspects of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism and can elicit biological responses in a paracrine manner when secreted. Caveolin-1 is also present in the serum of prostate cancer patients and circulating levels correlate with extent of disease. Current evidence indicates that increased expression of caveolin-1 in prostate adenocarcinoma cells and commensurate downregulation of the protein in prostate stroma, mediate progression to the castration-resistant phase of prostate cancer through diverse pathways. This chapter summarizes the current state of our understanding of the cellular and physiologic mechanisms in which caveolin-1 participates in the evolution of prostate cancer cell phenotypes.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.