JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Exclusive periductal/pericystic growth pattern in a case of long-standing monophasic synovial sarcoma of the parotid gland.
Histopathology
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a rare mesenchymal malignant neoplasm, which affects the head and neck region in only 5% of cases. In this scenario, the parotid gland is an exceedingly uncommon anatomical site.(1) A 37-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of recurrence of a slow-growing right parotid mass. His complex clinical history started in 1996 when a computed tomography scan displayed an oval/rounded nodule of 5cm (Figure 1A) that was considered consistent with a benign lesion. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Related JoVE Video
Association between idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis and autoimmune thyroiditis: A case-control study.
Autoimmun Rev
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRF) is a rare disease often associated with autoimmune disorders. Whether IRF is associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is poorly understood and only addressed by case-reports. We evaluated the prevalence of HT in a large IRF cohort and in matched controls.
Related JoVE Video
Aortic valve regurgitation secondary to ectopia and atresia of the left main coronary artery.
J. Heart Valve Dis.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Congenital atresia of the LMCA is an extremely rare anomaly which is often clinically complicated by silent angina, myocardial infarction, failure to thrive, or sudden cardiac death. Moreover, the atretic and ectopic origin of the LMCA associated with aortic valve anomalies is an even rarer condition. Herein, the case is described of a patient with a very rare association between the ectopic and atretic left main coronary artery (LMCA) and severe aortic valve regurgitation.
Related JoVE Video
Microcirculation density and maturity in uterine and soft tissue leiomyosarcomas: an immunohistochemical study.
Histol. Histopathol.
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The role of angiogenesis as a hallmark of tumor progression has been poorly explored in leiomyosarcoma, a rare but aggressive mesenchymal malignancy. We aimed to characterize microvessel distribution and morphology - including pericyte coverage - in a retrospective series of leyomiosarcomas of the soft tissues and the uterus. 41 whole-block tumor slides from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues were immunostained for endothelial-specific marker CD31 and microvessel density was quantified by assigning a grade to the frequency of CD31 positive microvessels. Vessel morphology and pericyte coverage were investigated by double-labeling for CD31 and either PDGFR?, ?SMA, desmin, CD90, or CD146. We found that microvessel density correlated with tumor grade in leiomyosarcoma of soft tissues, in analogy with what has been established in several types of carcinoma. This did not apply to uterine leiomyosarcoma, possibly due to the abundant myometrial vascularization. The evaluation of perivascular cell markers related to vessel stability revealed immature microvascular networks with aberrant pericyte coverage, irrespective of tumor origin or grade. Our observations substantiate the role of angiogenesis in the progression of soft tissue leiomyosarcoma. A multiple-marker approach to the assessment of pericyte coverage can identify different profiles of vessel immaturity correlated with tumor grade.
Related JoVE Video
Role of podocyte B7-1 in diabetic nephropathy.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Podocyte injury and resulting albuminuria are hallmarks of diabetic nephropathy, but targeted therapies to halt or prevent these complications are currently not available. Here, we show that the immune-related molecule B7-1/CD80 is a critical mediator of podocyte injury in type 2 diabetic nephropathy. We report the induction of podocyte B7-1 in kidney biopsy specimens from patients with type 2 diabetes. Genetic and epidemiologic studies revealed the association of two single nucleotide polymorphisms at the B7-1 gene with diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, increased levels of the soluble isoform of the B7-1 ligand CD28 correlated with the progression to ESRD in individuals with type 2 diabetes. In vitro, high glucose conditions prompted the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-dependent upregulation of B7-1 in podocytes, and the ectopic expression of B7-1 in podocytes increased apoptosis and induced disruption of the cytoskeleton that were reversed by the B7-1 inhibitor CTLA4-Ig. Podocyte expression of B7-1 was also induced in vivo in two murine models of diabetic nephropathy, and treatment with CTLA4-Ig prevented increased urinary albumin excretion and improved kidney pathology in these animals. Taken together, these results identify B7-1 inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention or treatment of diabetic nephropathy.
Related JoVE Video
Persistent lone atrial fibrillation: clinicopathologic study of 19 cases.
Heart Rhythm
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The extent to which atrial myocardium is remodeled in patients with persistent lone atrial fibrillation (LAF) is largely unknown.
Related JoVE Video
Atrial fibrillation from the pathologist's perspective.
Cardiovasc. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Electrophysiologically, it is characterized by a high rate of asynchronous atrial cell depolarization causing a loss of atrial contractile function and irregular ventricular rates. For a long time, AF was considered as a pure functional disorder without any structural background. Only in recent years, have new mapping and imaging techniques identified atrial locations, which are very often involved in the initiation and maintenance of this supraventricular arrhythmia (i.e. the distal portion of the pulmonary veins and the surrounding atrial myocardium). Morphological analysis of these myocardial sites has demonstrated significant structural remodeling as well as paved the way for further knowledge of AF natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment. This architectural myocardial disarrangement is induced by the arrhythmia itself and the very frequently associated cardiovascular disorders. At the same time, the structural remodeling is also capable of sustaining AF, thereby creating a sort of pathogenetic vicious circle. This review focuses on current understanding about the structural and genetic bases of AF with reference to their classification, pathogenesis, and clinical implications.
Related JoVE Video
Soft tissue chondroma of the oral cavity: an extremely rare tumour localized on the hard palate.
Case Rep Med
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Chondromas are benign cartilaginous tumors usually localized within the tubular bones of the extremities. Soft tissue chondromas (STCs) are rare and only few cases have been reported in the oral cavity. The present case documents the exceptional finding of a 12-year-standing STC of the hard palate of a 63-year-old man. The tumor measured approximately 6?cm in its larger size and it was radically excised through the use of a quantic resonance molecular (QRM) lancet. No recurrence was observed during 1-year follow-up. A concise review of the relevant literature is included in the present paper.
Related JoVE Video
The Effect of Aging on the Specialized Conducting System: A Telemetry ECG Study in Rats over a 6 Month Period.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Advanced age alone appears to be a risk factor for increased susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmias. We previously observed in the aged rat heart that sinus rhythm ventricular activation is delayed and characterized by abnormal epicardial patterns although conduction velocity is normal. While these findings relate to an advanced stage of aging, it is not yet known when and how ventricular electrical impairment originates and which is the underlying substrate. To address these points, we performed continuous telemetry ECG recordings in freely moving rats over a six-month period to monitor ECG waveform changes, heart rate variability and the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias. At the end of the study, we performed in-vivo multiple lead epicardial recordings and histopathology of cardiac tissue. We found that the duration of ECG waves and intervals gradually increased and heart rate variability gradually decreased with age. Moreover, the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias gradually increased, with atrial arrhythmias exceeding ventricular arrhythmias. Epicardial multiple lead recordings confirmed abnormalities in ventricular activation patterns, likely attributable to distal conducting system dysfunctions. Microscopic analysis of aged heart specimens revealed multifocal connective tissue deposition and perinuclear myocytolysis in the atria. Our results demonstrate that aging gradually modifies the terminal part of the specialized cardiac conducting system, creating a substrate for increased arrhythmogenesis. These findings may open new therapeutic options in the management of cardiac arrhythmias in the elderly population.
Related JoVE Video
Low-grade myofibroblastic proliferations of the urinary bladder.
Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Myofibroblastic proliferations of the urinary bladder, which share some similarities with nodular fasciitis, were first reported in 1980. Since then, they have had several designations, the most frequently used being inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. Based on both histopathologic and prognostic grounds, some authors prefer the term pseudosarcomatous myofibroblastic proliferation, at least for some of the proliferations. These same scientists also assimilate the so-called postoperative spindle cell nodules with the pseudosarcomatous myofibroblastic proliferations. Little is known about these low-grade myofibroblastic proliferations.
Related JoVE Video
Interleukin-6 as an inflammatory mediator and target of therapy in chronic periaortitis.
Arthritis Rheum.
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Chronic periaortitis (CP) usually responds to glucocorticoids, but some patients have glucocorticoid-refractory disease or contraindications to glucocorticoid therapy. This study was undertaken to evaluate treatment with the anti-interleukin-6 receptor (anti-IL-6R) antibody tocilizumab in 2 patients with CP, one with refractory disease and the other with contraindications to glucocorticoids, and to assess IL-6 levels in an additional cohort of patients with CP.
Related JoVE Video
Morphology and pathophysiology of target anatomical sites for ablation procedures in patients with atrial fibrillation: part II: pulmonary veins, caval veins, ganglionated plexi, and ligament of Marshall.
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The inadequate long-term efficacy of anti-arrhythmic therapy has been one of the main reasons for the development of non-pharmacological interventions for patients with atrial fibrillation such as catheter and surgical ablation. This has greatly increased interest in the functional morphology and electrophysiological properties of the atria and related anatomical structures. This article is the second of a two-part review that aims to provide anatomical and functional details concerning some of the principal anatomical sites commonly targeted by ablative procedures for treating atrial fibrillation, and covers pulmonary veins, ganglionated plexi, caval veins, and the ligament of Marshall. It also provides some general information about site-specific ablation procedures.
Related JoVE Video
Morphology and pathophysiology of target anatomical sites for ablation procedures in patients with atrial fibrillation. Part I: atrial structures (atrial myocardium and coronary sinus).
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that the natural history of atrial fibrillation is characterised by increased structural remodelling, which may play a pivotal role in maintaining the arrhythmia and clinically favours progression from paroxysmal to persistent atrial fibrillation. In this setting, anti-arrhythmic therapy gradually becomes inefficient, and this limitation has led to the introduction of new non-pharmacological interventions such as surgical or catheter ablation. At the same time, interest in the functional morphology and electrophysiological properties of the atria and their related anatomical structures has greatly increased. This article is the first of a two-part review whose main purpose is to describe the anatomical and functional details of some of the principal anatomical locations that are commonly targeted by ablative procedures to treat this supraventricular arrhythmia. In particular, this manuscript has dealt with the atrial structures (atrial myocardium and coronary sinus). General information on ablation procedures has also been provided.
Related JoVE Video
Effect of the purinergic inhibitor oxidized ATP in a model of islet allograft rejection.
Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The lymphocytic ionotropic purinergic P2X receptors (P2X1R-P2X7R, or P2XRs) sense ATP released during cell damage-activation, thus regulating T-cell activation. We aim to define the role of P2XRs during islet allograft rejection and to establish a novel anti-P2XRs strategy to achieve long-term islet allograft function. Our data demonstrate that P2X1R and P2X7R are induced in islet allograft-infiltrating cells, that only P2X7R is increasingly expressed during alloimmune response, and that P2X1R is augmented in both allogeneic and syngeneic transplantation. In vivo short-term P2X7R targeting (using periodate-oxidized ATP [oATP]) delays islet allograft rejection, reduces the frequency of Th1/Th17 cells, and induces hyporesponsiveness toward donor antigens. oATP-treated mice displayed preserved islet grafts with reduced Th1 transcripts. P2X7R targeting and rapamycin synergized in inducing long-term islet function in 80% of transplanted mice and resulted in reshaping of the recipient immune system. In vitro P2X7R targeting using oATP reduced T-cell activation and diminished Th1/Th17 cytokine production. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from long-term islet-transplanted patients showed an increased percentage of P2X7R?CD4? T cells compared with controls. The beneficial effects of oATP treatment revealed a role for the purinergic system in islet allograft rejection, and the targeting of P2X7R is a novel strategy to induce long-term islet allograft function.
Related JoVE Video
Multicentric osteosarcoma: clinicopathologic and radiographic study of 56 cases.
Am. J. Clin. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Multicentric osteosarcoma (M-OGS) is characterized by multicentricity of osseous osteosarcomas, either synchronous or metachronous, without visceral involvement. The studys purpose was to clinicopathologically and radiographically analyze 56 cases of M-OGS (22 synchronous and 34 metachronous). The distal femur was the most common site. Histologically, all tumors were high grade. Of 22 patients with synchronous M-OGS, 16 had 3 or more simultaneous tumors; the axial skeleton was involved in 14 (64%) of 22 cases. In metachronous M-OGS, the second malignancy occurred after a median of 22 months. Treatment was surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or a combination of these. Patients with metachronous osteosarcoma had a median survival longer than did patients with synchronous tumors. Overall, 8 long-term survivors were treated by aggressive surgery with wide margins (plus chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy). M-OGS combines multiple skeletal locations of high-grade conventional osteosarcomas and has a poor prognosis. Aggressive surgery may result in improved long-term survival, particularly in patients with metachronous disease.
Related JoVE Video
Differential structural remodeling of the left-atrial posterior wall in patients affected by mitral regurgitation with or without persistent atrial fibrillation: a morphological and molecular study.
J. Cardiovasc. Electrophysiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-28-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) in mitral regurgitation (MR) is a complex disease where multiple factors may induce left-atrial structural remodeling (SR). We explored the differential SR of the left-atrial posterior wall (LAPW) of patients affected by MR with or without persistent AF, and the expression of key proteins involved in its pathogenesis.
Related JoVE Video
Endometrial metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma: a case report.
Tumori
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The female genital tract is an infrequent site of metastasis, in particular from extragenital primary tumors such as non-small cell lung cancer. Ovarian metastases have been described as disseminations of lung adenocarcinoma; rare cases of secondary localizations in adnexa, cervix and vagina were also observed in the literature, but none of these had endometrial involvement. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of non-small cell lung cancer with metastatic spread to the endometrium.
Related JoVE Video
Prednisone versus tamoxifen in patients with idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis: an open-label randomised controlled trial.
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Glucocorticoids are the mainstay of treatment of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, but they often have substantial toxic effects. Several reports have suggested tamoxifen as an alternative to glucocorticoids. We compared the efficacy of prednisone with that of tamoxifen in maintainance of remission in patients with idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis.
Related JoVE Video
The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus micro- and macrovascular complications: avenues for a mechanistic-based therapeutic approach.
Curr Diabetes Rev
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A growing body of evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of micro- and macrovascular diabetic complications. The increased oxidative stress in subjects with type 2 diabetes is a consequence of several abnormalities, including hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia, each of which contributes to mitochondrial superoxide overproduction in endothelial cells of large and small vessels as well as the myocardium. The unifying pathophysiological mechanism that underlies diabetic complications could be explained by increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via: (1) the polyol pathway flux, (2) increased formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), (3) increased expression of the receptor for AGEs, (4) activation of protein kinase C isoforms, and (5) overactivity of the hexosamine pathway. Furthermore, the effects of oxidative stress in individuals with type 2 diabetes are compounded by the inactivation of two critical anti-atherosclerotic enzymes: endothelial nitric oxide synthase and prostacyclin synthase. Of interest, the results of clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetes in whom intensive management of all the components of the metabolic syndrome (hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and essential hypertension) was attempted (with agents that exert a beneficial effect on serum glucose, serum lipid concentrations, and blood pressure, respectively) showed a decrease in adverse cardiovascular end points. The purpose of this review is (1) to examine the mechanisms that link oxidative stress to micro- and macrovascular complications in subjects with type 2 diabetes and (2) to consider the therapeutic opportunities that are presented by currently used therapeutic agents which possess antioxidant properties as well as new potential antioxidant substances.
Related JoVE Video
Clinical and molecular observations of two fatal cases of rotavirus-associated enteritis in children in Italy.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-27-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Two fatal cases of infantile rotavirus enteritis occurred in northern Italy in 2005. Both children were severely dehydrated, and death was related to severe cerebral edema. Histological examination demonstrated extensive damage of the intestinal epithelium, villous atrophy or blunting, and macrophage infiltration. The two rotavirus strains were of the G1P[8] type and the long electropherotype. The 2005 G1P[8] rotaviruses differed in the NSP4, VP3, VP4, and VP7 genes from G1P[8] rotaviruses circulating in 2004, suggesting the onset of a new G1P[8] strain in the local population.
Related JoVE Video
Concomitant off-pump modified maze and coronary surgery.
Ann. Thorac. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We describe a modification of the Cox-Maze III using bipolar radiofrequency combined with off-pump coronary artery surgery for the treatment of patients with coronary artery disease and long-standing permanent atrial fibrillation. This study reports the midterm outcome of 12 patients with coronary artery disease and long-standing permanent atrial fibrillation who underwent off-pump coronary artery surgery and concomitant modified Maze with bipolar radiofrequency. At a mean follow-up of 23 months, all patients were alive, and 75% (9 of 12) had sinus rhythm. Our modified Maze can be safely and effectively combined with coronary artery surgery in an off-pump setting.
Related JoVE Video
Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the vagus nerve in a teenager with the neurofibromatosis 1 gene mutation: a case report.
J. Pediatr. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors account for approximately 5% to 10% of all soft tissue sarcomas in which 25% to 50% are diagnosed in patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). Tumors are often located in the proximal portion of the upper and lower extremities and trunk, whereas cervical vagus nerve localizations are extremely rare, and the English literature is limited to isolated case reports. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors usually affect adults. However, earlier presentation is described in patients with the NF1 mutation. The authors describe a very rare case of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the vagus nerve in a teenage patient with NF1 focusing on surgical management of this uncommon pathology and its histopathologic features to underline the importance of differential diagnosis and early treatment of this rare and aggressive tumor.
Related JoVE Video
A small intraneural epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the median nerve simulating a benign lesion: description of a case and review of the literature.
Pathol. Oncol. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The epithelioid variant of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs) is a very rare malignancy. We describe the case of a 30-year-old man complaining of acute pain in his right elbow, mild distal paraesthesias, and some motor deficiencies. He was discovered as having a small fusiform swelling of the median nerve. In view of its very small size, shape, and nonspecific MRI signal, it had initially suggested a benign lesion. The diagnosis of epithelioid MPNST was made only at the histopathological examination. This malignant neoplasm recurred locally fourteen months after surgery. In addition to describe the above very rare case, we have reviewed the literature on epithelioid MPNSTs clearly involving deep major nerve trunks. This case serves as a warning that, even in major nerve trunks, tiny lesions may in reality be early intraneural MPNSTs which, due to their deep location, must be treated adequately with wide margin surgery since the resection margin status represents one of the major parameters influencing the local control of disease and its clinical outcome.
Related JoVE Video
The atria: from morphology to function.
J. Cardiovasc. Electrophysiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-31-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The fact that some atrial and ventricular disorders (e.g., atrial fibrillation and heart failure) have a structural basis and cause atrial myocardial remodeling has led to increasing attention being paid to the atrial chambers. Furthermore, the rapid development of mapping and ablative procedures as a means of diagnosing and treating supraventricular arrhythmias has generated considerable interest in atrial gross anatomy, histology and ultrastructure. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive overview of the structure of the left and right atria (at macroscopic, histological and ultrastructural level) in relation to their function. In addition to analyzing normal atria, we also discuss functional anatomy in the case of atrial fibrillation and heart failure.
Related JoVE Video
Fibro-osseous dysplasia localized to the zygomatic arch: case report.
J Craniomaxillofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Fibrous dysplasia is an osseous growth disorder, producing immature bone characterized by the replacement of normal bone with fibro-osseous connective tissue. The therapy is surgical, but the diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia of the craniofacial bones is not in itself an indication for treatment. The authors present a rare case of a zygomatic arch localization of fibrous dysplasia causing considerable facial asymmetry and social impairment. The clinical and radiological features are presented, the surgical procedure and indications are then described and the histopathological findings are discussed.
Related JoVE Video
Multidetector computed tomography arthrography of the knee: diagnostic accuracy and indications.
Eur J Radiol
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and indications of arthrography with multidetector computed tomography (arthro-MDCT) of the knee, in patients with absolute or relative contraindications to MRI and in patients with periarticular metal implants using diagnostic arthroscopy as the gold standard.
Related JoVE Video
Gallbladder ulcer eroding the cystic artery: a rare cause of hemobilia.
Am. J. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We report a hemorrhage from an eroded cystic artery in an ulcer of an inflamed calcolous gallbladder. Bleeding from the papilla was observed at side-view endoscopy. Echo endoscopy and contrast-enhanced computed tomography suggested a gallbladder bleeding. A clear-cut diagnosis was made by selective angiography, followed by embolization of the cystic artery, hence stopping the hemorrhage. Cystic artery bleeding into the gallbladder is rare. The diagnostic and therapeutic implications are discussed.
Related JoVE Video
Postpartum Churg-Strauss syndrome with severe cardiac involvement: description of a case and review of the literature.
Clin. Rheumatol.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare small- or intermediate-vessel necrotizing vasculitis typically characterized by asthma, lung infiltrates, necrotizing granulomas, and hypereosinophilia. In this report, we describe the case of a 35-year-old woman who, during her third trimester of pregnancy, developed dyspnea and, after delivery, severe cardiac failure which required heart transplantation. Diagnosis of CSS was made after performing a myocardial biopsy. We have also undertaken a review of the English-language literature regarding previously reported cases of pregnancies in women suffering from Churg-Strauss syndrome with particular attention to those patients with cardiovascular involvement.
Related JoVE Video
Atorvastatin attenuates post-implant tissue degeneration of cardiac prosthetic valve bovine pericardial tissue in a subcutaneous animal model.
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The aim of our study was to examine the effects of statin therapy (atorvastatin) on post-implant structural changes of bovine pericardial tissue in a subcutaneous animal model.
Related JoVE Video
Hemangioma of the right atrium: imaging and pathology.
Cardiovasc. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cardiac hemangiomas are benign neoplasms which have been reported to appear as well-circumscribed, homogenous, enhancing masses at imaging.
Related JoVE Video
Long-term heart transplant survival by targeting the ionotropic purinergic receptor P2X7.
Circulation
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Heart transplantation is a lifesaving procedure for patients with end-stage heart failure. Despite much effort and advances in the field, current immunosuppressive regimens are still associated with poor long-term cardiac allograft outcomes, and with the development of complications, including infections and malignancies, as well. The development of a novel, short-term, and effective immunomodulatory protocol will thus be an important achievement. The purine ATP, released during cell damage/activation, is sensed by the ionotropic purinergic receptor P2X7 (P2X7R) on lymphocytes and regulates T-cell activation. Novel clinical-grade P2X7R inhibitors are available, rendering the targeting of P2X7R a potential therapy in cardiac transplantation.
Related JoVE Video
Huge desmoplastic fibroma of the paediatric mandible: surgical considerations and follow-up in three cases.
J Craniomaxillofac Surg
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The desmoplastic fibroma is a rare locally aggressive spindle-cell proliferation made up of fibroblasts/myofibroblasts immersed in a dense collagenic stroma. Head and neck localisation of desmoplastic fibromas is even more rare and the literature is limited to small case series and reviews. A comprehensive review of the English literature from 1968 to 2011 revealed only 79 cases of mandibular desmoplastic fibromas and only 18 (22%) in patients under 4 years of age. Complete resection with clear margins is the surgical first option, but it can be difficult to achieve in the paediatric mandible, especially for giant tumours as the three reported here. Mandibular reconstruction in these cases is mandatory to ensure correct craniofacial development. The authors present three cases of huge mandibular desmoplastic fibromas in paediatric patients treated with mandibulectomy and immediate reconstruction using rib grafts. Indications, reconstructive options and results are discussed.
Related JoVE Video
Eotaxin/CCL11 in idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRF) is a rare fibro-inflammatory disorder characterized by a periaortic tissue which often encases the ureters causing acute renal failure. IRF histology shows fibrosis and a chronic inflammatory infiltrate with frequent tissue eosinophilia. We assessed a panel of molecules promoting eosinophilia and fibrosis in IRF patients and performed an immunogenetic study.
Related JoVE Video
Anatomical basis of minimally invasive epicardial ablation of atrial fibrillation.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Minimally invasive atrial fibrillation surgery (MIAFS) has become a well established and increasingly used option for managing patients with stand-alone arrhythmia. Pulmonary veins (PVs) isolation continues to be the cornerstone of ablation strategies. Indeed, in most cases, atrial fibrillation (AF) is triggered in or near the PVs. Nevertheless, ectopic beats initiating AF may occasionally arise from non-PV foci. The knowledge of the anatomy and underlying morphology of PVs and non-PV foci is essential for cardiac surgeons treating AF patients with epicardial minimally invasive procedures. The anatomical structures relevant to the pathogenesis and the epicardial treatment of AF include the PVs, the pericardial space, the pericardial sinuses, the phrenic nerve, the left atrium, the retro-atrial and caval ganglionated plexuses, the ligament of Marshall, the caval veins and the left atrial appendage. In this review, we briefly describe the basic anatomy of these structures and discuss their specific correlations for cardiac surgeons interested in performing MIAFS.
Related JoVE Video
Pro-inflammatory genetic profile and familiarity of acute myocardial infarction.
Immun Ageing
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a multifactorial disease with a complex pathogenesis where lifestyle, individual genetic background and environmental risk factors are involved. Altered inflammatory responses are implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and a premature AMI of parents is associated with an increased risk of the disease in their offspring (Offs). However, the genetic background of familiarity for AMI is still largely unknown. To understand which genes may predispose to increased risk of cardiovascular disease gene polymorphism of immune regulatory genes, and clinical events from the Offs of parents with an early AMI were investigated. Genetics data from Offs were compared with those obtained from healthy subjects and an independent cohort of patients with clinical sporadic AMI. Rates of clinical events during a 24?years follow up from Offs and from an independent Italian population survey were also evaluated.
Related JoVE Video
Immunohistochemical analysis of the endoribonucleases Drosha, Dicer and Ago2 in smooth muscle tumours of soft tissues.
Histopathology
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
? The aims of the present study were to determine the protein levels and cellular distribution of the endoribonucleases Drosha, Dicer and Ago2, major components of the microRNA-processing machinery, in benign and malignant soft tissue smooth muscle tumours, and to correlate the cellular levels of these enzymes with clinicopathological parameters including tumour histopathological grade.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.