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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A fulminant syndrome associated with multiorgan failure and high mortality that frequently masquerades as sepsis and shock.
S. Afr. Med. J.
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2014
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Acquired haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a condition involving cytokine overproduction by defective cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells, resulting in life-threatening cytopenias and multiorgan infiltration and dysfunction. Triggers for acquired HLH vary and include viruses, malignancies and autoimmune conditions. Recent reports suggest that HLH may be underdiagnosed owing to variable clinical presentations, diagnostic criteria and a low level of awareness on the part of medical personnel, thus delaying prompt treatment and contributing to high mortality rates. Five patients in whom acquired HLH was diagnosed, following bone marrow investigations, for the period of May - September 2013 are presented. All were at an advanced stage of their disease at time of diagnosis. The three patients who were HIV-positive had a coexisting malignancy at the time of HLH diagnosis, which may have triggered HLH. A definite trigger was not identified in the remaining two HIV-negative patients despite early concerns regarding autoimmune disease. Two patients received timeous diagnosis, started chemotherapy and are currently improving. The remaining three succumbed to their illness. Adult acquired HLH may be more common in the acute care setting than currently appreciated. As awareness of this condition and its treatment is currently low, it may remain undiagnosed until the disease has evolved into multiorgan failure. Fever in the absence of infectious agents, marked hyperferritinaemia, unexplained cytopenias, organomegaly or liver dysfunction should raise the suspicion of HLH. Timeous introduction of therapy will improve outcomes.
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HIV replication in conjunction with granzyme B production by CCR5+ memory CD4 T cells: Implications for bystander cell and tissue pathologies.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2014
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Granzyme B (GrzB) is expressed by activated T cells and mediates cellular apoptosis. GrzB also acts as an extracellular protease involved in tissue degradation. We hypothesized that GrzB production from activated memory CD4 T cells may be associated with HIV pathogenesis. We found that stimulated memory CD4 T cells (via costimulation, cytokines, and TLR ligands) concomitantly produced GrzB and HIV. Both GrzB and HIV expression were mainly restricted to CCR5-expressing memory CD4+CD45RO+ T cells, including Th1 and Th17 subsets. Activated memory CD4 T cells also mediated tissue damage, such as disruption of intestinal epithelial monolayers. In non-human primates, CD4 T cells of rhesus macaques (pathogenic SIV hosts) expressed higher GrzB compared to African green monkeys (non-pathogenic SIV hosts). These results suggest that GrzB from CCR5+ memory CD4 T cells may have a role in cellular and tissue pathologies during HIV infection.
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PMA induces SnoN proteolysis and CD61 expression through an autocrine mechanism.
Cell. Signal.
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2014
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Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, also called PMA, is a small molecule that activates protein kinase C and functions to differentiate hematologic lineage cells. However, the mechanism of PMA-induced cellular differentiation is not fully understood. We found that PMA triggers global enhancement of protein ubiquitination in K562, a myelogenous leukemia cell line and one of the enhanced-ubiquitination targets is SnoN, an inhibitor of the Smad signaling pathway. Our data indicated that PMA stimulated the production of Activin A, a cytokine of the TGF-? family. Activin A then activated the phosphorylation of both Smad2 and Smad3. In consequence, SnoN is ubiquitinated by the APC(Cdh1) ubiquitin ligase with the help of phosphorylated Smad2. Furthermore, we found that SnoN proteolysis is important for the expression of CD61, a marker of megakaryocyte. These results indicate that protein ubiquitination promotes megakaryopoiesis via degrading SnoN, an inhibitor of CD61 expression, strengths the roles of ubiquitination in cellular differentiation.
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Granzyme B secretion by human memory CD4 T cells is less strictly regulated compared to memory CD8 T cells.
BMC Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2014
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Granzyme B (GrzB) is a serine proteinase expressed by memory T cells and NK cells. Methods to measure GrzB protein usually involve intracellular (flow cytometry) and extracellular (ELISA and ELISpot) assays. CD8 T cells are the main source of GrzB during immunological reactions, but activated CD4 T cells deploy GrzB as well. Because GrzB is an important mediator of cell death, tissue pathology and disease, clarification of differences of GrzB expression and secretion between CD4 and CD8 T cells is important for understanding effector functions of these cells.
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HIV-1 Vpr Induces Adipose Dysfunction in Vivo Through Reciprocal Effects on PPAR/GR Co-Regulation.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 11-29-2013
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Viral infections, such as HIV, have been linked to obesity, but mechanistic evidence that they cause adipose dysfunction in vivo is lacking. We investigated a pathogenic role for the HIV-1 accessory protein viral protein R (Vpr), which can coactivate the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and co-repress peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) in vitro, in HIV-associated adipose dysfunction. Vpr circulated in the blood of most HIV-infected patients tested, including those on antiretroviral therapy (ART) with undetectable viral load. Vpr-mediated mechanisms were dissected in vivo using mouse models expressing the Vpr transgene in adipose tissues and liver (Vpr-Tg) or infused with synthetic Vpr. Both models demonstrated accelerated whole-body lipolysis, hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia, and tissue-specific findings. Fat depots in these mice had diminished mass, macrophage infiltration, and blunted PPAR? target gene expression but increased GR target gene expression. In liver, we observed blunted PPAR? target gene expression, steatosis with decreased adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity, and insulin resistance. Similar to human HIV-infected patients, Vpr circulated in the serum of Vpr-Tg mice. Vpr blocked differentiation in preadipocytes through cell cycle arrest, whereas in mature adipocytes, it increased lipolysis with reciprocally altered association of PPAR? and GR with their target promoters. These results delineate a distinct pathogenic sequence: Vpr, released from HIV-1 in tissue reservoirs after ART, can disrupt PPAR/GR co-regulation and cell cycle control to produce adipose dysfunction and hepatosteatosis. Confirmation of these mechanisms in HIV patients could lead to targeted treatment of the metabolic complications with Vpr inhibitors, GR antagonists, or PPAR?/PPAR? agonists.
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An effective vaccination approach augments anti-HIV systemic and vaginal immunity in mice with decreased HIV-1 susceptible ?4?7high CD4+ T cells.
Curr. HIV Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2013
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HIV-1 preferentially infects activated CD4(+) T cells expressing ?4?7 integrin and conventional vaccination approaches non-selectively induce immune responses including ?4?7(high) CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that current candidate AIDS vaccines may produce more target cells for HIV-1 and paradoxically enhance HIV-1 infection. Thus it remains a challenge to selectively induce robust anti-HIV immunity without the unwanted HIV-1 susceptible ?4?77(high) CD4(+)+ T cells. Here we describe a vaccination strategy that targets ALDH1a2, a retinoic acid producing enzyme in dendritic cells (DCs). Silencing ALDH1a2 in DCs enhanced the maturation and production of proinflammatory cytokines of DCs and promoted Th1/Th2 differentiation while suppressing Treg. ALDH1a2-silenced DCs effectively downregulated the expression of guthoming receptors ?4?77 and CCR9 on activated T and B lymphocytes. Consequently, intranasal immunization of a lentiviral vaccine encoding ALDH1a2 shRNA and HIV-1 gp140 redirected gp140-specific mucosal T cell and antibody responses from the gut to the vaginal tract, while dramatically enhancing systemic gp140-specific immune responses. We further demonstrated that silencing ALDH1a2 in human DCs resulted in downregulation of ?7 expression on activated autologous CD4(+) T cells. Hence this study provides a unique and effective strategy to induce ?4?7(low) anti-HIV immune responses.
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CD25 and CD69 induction by ?4?1 outside-in signalling requires TCR early signalling complex proteins.
Biochem. J.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2013
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Distinct signalling pathways producing diverse cellular outcomes can utilize similar subsets of proteins. For example, proteins from the TCR (T-cell receptor) ESC (early signalling complex) are also involved in interferon-? receptor signalling. Defining the mechanism for how these proteins function within a given pathway is important in understanding the integration and communication of signalling networks with one another. We investigated the contributions of the TCR ESC proteins Lck (lymphocyte-specific kinase), ZAP-70 (?-chain-associated protein of 70 kDa), Vav1, SLP-76 [SH2 (Src homology 2)-domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa] and LAT (linker for activation of T-cells) to integrin outside-in signalling in human T-cells. Lck, ZAP-70, SLP-76, Vav1 and LAT were activated by ?4?1 outside-in signalling, but in a manner different from TCR signalling. TCR stimulation recruits ESC proteins to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase). ?4?1 outside-in-mediated ERK activation did not require TCR ESC proteins. However, ?4?1 outside-in signalling induced CD25 and co-stimulated CD69 and this was dependent on TCR ESC proteins. TCR and ?4?1 outside-in signalling are integrated through the common use of TCR ESC proteins; however, these proteins display functionally distinct roles in these pathways. These novel insights into the cross-talk between integrin outside-in and TCR signalling pathways are highly relevant to the development of therapeutic strategies to overcome disease associated with T-cell deregulation.
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Can serum surfactant protein D or CC-chemokine ligand 18 predict outcome of interstitial lung disease in patients with early systemic sclerosis?
J. Rheumatol.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2013
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To examine the predictive significance of 2 pneumoproteins, surfactant protein D (SP-D) and CC-chemokine ligand 18 (CCL18), for the course of systemic sclerosis (SSc)-related interstitial lung disease.
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Relationship of ethnicity and CD4 Count with glucose metabolism among HIV patients on Highly-Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART).
BMC Endocr Disord
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2013
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HIV patients on HAART are prone to metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, lipodystrophy and diabetes. This study purports to investigate the relationship of ethnicity and CD4+ T cell count attained after stable highly-active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) with glucose metabolism in hyperrtriglyceridemic HIV patients without a history of diabetes.
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Aqp2-expressing cells give rise to renal intercalated cells.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2013
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The mammalian collecting duct comprises principal and intercalated cells, which maintain sodium/water and acid/base balance, respectively, but the epigenetic contributors to the differentiation of these cell types remain unknown. Here, we investigated whether the histone H3 K79 methyltransferase Dot1l, which is highly expressed in principal cells, participates in this process. Taking advantage of the distribution of aquaporin 2 (Aqp2), which localizes to principal cells of the collecting duct, we developed mice lacking Dot1l in Aqp2-expressing cells (Dot1l(AC)) and found that these mice had approximately 20% fewer principal cells and 13%-16% more intercalated cells than control mice. This deletion of Dot1l in principal cells abolished histone H3 K79 methylation in these cells, but unexpectedly, most intercalated cells also had undetectable di-methyl K79, suggesting that Aqp2(+) cells give rise to intercalated cells. These Aqp2(+) cell-derived intercalated cells were present in both developing and mature kidneys. Furthermore, compared with control mice, Dot1l(AC) mice had 40% higher urine volume and 18% lower urine osmolarity with relatively normal electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis. In conclusion, these data suggest that Dot1l deletion facilitates the differentiation of some ?- and ?-intercalated cells from Aqp2-expressing progenitor cells or mature principal cells.
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Human monocytes accelerate proliferation and blunt differentiation of preadipocytes in association with suppression of C/EBP? mRNA.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2011
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Obesity, type 2 diabetes, and HIV-associated lipodystrophy are associated with abnormalities in adipocyte growth and differentiation. In persons with these conditions, adipose depots contain increased numbers of macrophages, but the origins of these cells and their specific effects are uncertain. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-derived monocytes, but not T cells, cocultured via transwells with primary subcutaneous preadipocytes, increased proliferation (approximately twofold) and reduced differentiation (~50%) of preadipocytes. Gene expression analyses in proliferating preadipocytes (i.e., prior to hormonal induction of terminal differentiation) revealed that monocytes down-regulated mRNA levels of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein, alpha (C/EBP?) and up-regulated mRNA levels of G0/G1 switch 2 (G0S2) message, genes important for the regulation of adipogenesis and the cell cycle. These data indicate that circulating peripheral blood monocytes can disrupt adipogenesis by interfering with a critical step in C/EBP? and G0S2 transcription required for preadipocytes to make the transition from proliferation to differentiation. Interactions between preadipocytes and monocytes also increased the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, as well as a novel chemotactic cytokine, CXCL1. Additionally, the levels of both IL-6 and CXCL1 were highest when preadipocytes and monocytes were cultured together, compared to each cell in culture alone. Such cross-talk amplifies the production of mediators of tissue inflammation.
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Cryopreservation modulates the detection of regulatory T cell markers.
Cytometry B Clin Cytom
PUBLISHED: 08-10-2011
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Regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate the host response in infectious diseases and are key mediators of peripheral tolerance. Cryopreservation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) is commonly used in immunological field studies where access to complex laboratory tests is not feasible. Our objective is to assess the effects of cryopreservation on the flow cytometric detection of surface and intracellular markers of Tregs.
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A Novel in vitro Human Macrophage Model to Study the Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Vitamin D(3) and Retinoic Acid Activated THP-1 Macrophages.
Front Microbiol
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2011
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Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) replicates within the human macrophages and we investigated the activating effects of retinoic acid (RA) and vitamin D(3) (VD) on macrophages in relation to the viability of intracellular Mtb. A combination of these vitamins (RAVD) enhanced the levels of DC-SIGN and mannose receptors on THP-1 macrophages that increased mycobacterial uptake but inhibited the subsequent intracellular growth of Mtb by inducing reactive oxygen species and autophagy. RAVD also enhanced antigen presenting and chemotactic receptors on THPs suggesting an activated phenotype for RAVD activated THPs. RAVD mediated activation was also associated with a marked phenotypic change in Mtb infected THPs that fused with adjacent THPs to form multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs). Typically, MNGCs occurred over 30?days of in vitro culture and contained non-replicating persisting Mtb for more than 60?days in culture. Latent tuberculosis occurs in over a third of mankind and we propose that RAVD mediated induction of persistent Mtb within human macrophages provides a novel model to develop therapeutic approaches and investigate pathogenesis of latency.
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Normalization of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells in response to effective antiretroviral therapy.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 12-21-2010
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Regulatory T cells (Tregs) blunt uncontrolled immune responses. In advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the total number of Tregs is decreased, but the proportion of T cells with a regulatory phenotype is highly variable. We studied CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T cells from patients successfully treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (ART). The proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) cells transiently increased and then decreased from a median of 13% at baseline to 5.1% at 48 weeks, similar to values in normal subjects. These data suggest that with effective therapy, the regulatory cell numbers normalize, and that the inflammatory signals driving their production may also abate.
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Detrimental effects of adenosine signaling in sickle cell disease.
Nat. Med.
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2010
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Hypoxia can act as an initial trigger to induce erythrocyte sickling and eventual end organ damage in sickle cell disease (SCD). Many factors and metabolites are altered in response to hypoxia and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Using metabolomic profiling, we found that the steady-state concentration of adenosine in the blood was elevated in a transgenic mouse model of SCD. Adenosine concentrations were similarly elevated in the blood of humans with SCD. Increased adenosine levels promoted sickling, hemolysis and damage to multiple tissues in SCD transgenic mice and promoted sickling of human erythrocytes. Using biochemical, genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that adenosine A(2B) receptor (A(2B)R)-mediated induction of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an erythrocyte-specific metabolite that decreases the oxygen binding affinity of hemoglobin, underlies the induction of erythrocyte sickling by excess adenosine both in cultured human red blood cells and in SCD transgenic mice. Thus, excessive adenosine signaling through the A(2B)R has a pathological role in SCD. These findings may provide new therapeutic possibilities for this disease.
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Human CD8(+) T cells clear Cryptosporidium parvum from infected intestinal epithelial cells.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2010
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Intracellular protozoans of the genus Cryptosporidium are a major cause of diarrheal illness worldwide, especially in immunocompromised individuals. CD4(+) T cells and interferon-gamma are key factors in the control of cryptosporidiosis in human and murine models. Previous studies led us to hypothesize that CD8(+) T cells contribute to clearance of intestinal epithelial Cryptosporidium infection in humans. We report here that antigen expanded sensitized CD8(+) T cells reduce the parasite load in infected intestinal epithelial cell cultures and lyse infected intestinal epithelial cells. These effects are most likely mediated by the release of cytotoxic granules. Elimination of parasites seems to require antigen presentation through both human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A and HLA-B. These data suggest that cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells play a role in clearing Cryptosporidium from the intestine, a previously unrecognized feature of the human immune response against this parasite.
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Flow cytometric analysis of circulating microparticles in plasma.
Cytometry A
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2010
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Microparticles, which include exosomes, micro-vesicles, apoptotic bodies and apoptotic microparticles, are small (0.05 - 3 mum in diameter), membranous vesicles that can contain DNA, RNA, miRNA, intracellular proteins and express extracellular surface markers from the parental cells. They can be secreted from intracellular multivesicular bodies or released from the surface of blebbing membranes. Circulating microparticles are abundant in the plasma of normal individuals and can be derived from circulating blood cells such as platelets, red blood cells and leukocytes as well as from tissue sources, such as endothelial and placental tissues. Elevated levels of microparticles are associated with various diseases such as thrombosis (platelet microparticles), congestive heart failure (endothelial microparticles), breast cancer patients (leukocyte microparticles) and women with preeclampsia (syncytiotrophoblast microparticles). Although microparticles can be detected by microscopy, enzyme-linked immunoassays and functional assays, flow cytometry is the preferred method because of the ability to quantitate (fluorescent bead- or flow rate-based method) and because of polychromatic capabilities. However, standardization of pre-analytical and analytical modus operandi for isolating, enumerating and fluorescent labeling of microparticles remains a challenge. The primary focus of this article is to review the preliminary steps required to optimally study circulating in vivo microparticles which include: 1) centrifugation speed used, 2) quantitation of microparticles before antibody labeling, 3) levels of fluorescence intensity of antibody-labeled microparticles, 4) polychromatic flow cytometric analysis of microparticle sub-populations and 5) use of polyclonal antibodies designed for Western blotting for flow cytometry. These studies determine a roadmap to develop microparticles as biomarkers for a variety of conditions.
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Regulatory T cell expansion in HTLV-1 and strongyloidiasis co-infection is associated with reduced IL-5 responses to Strongyloides stercoralis antigen.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2009
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Human strongyloidiasis varies from a chronic but limited infection in normal hosts to hyperinfection in patients treated with corticosteroids or with HTLV-1 co-infection. Regulatory T cells dampen immune responses to infections. How human strongyloidiasis is controlled and how HTLV-1 infection affects this control are not clear. We hypothesize that HTLV-1 leads to dissemination of Strongyloides stercoralis infection by augmenting regulatory T cell numbers, which in turn down regulate the immune response to the parasite.
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CD28-negative CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV-infected adults enrolled in adult clinical trials group studies.
J. Infect. Dis.
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Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have higher risk than HIV-negative individuals for diseases associated with aging. T-cell senescence, characterized by expansion of cells lacking the costimulatory molecule CD28, has been hypothesized to mediate these risks.
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Granzyme B- and Fas ligand-mediated cytotoxic function induced by mitogenic CD28 stimulation of human memory CD4+ T cells.
J. Leukoc. Biol.
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Some human memory CD4(+) T cells have cytotoxic functions best understood in the context of viral infections; however, their possible role in pathologic processes is understudied. The novel discovery that mitogenic CD28 antibodies induced proliferation and expansion of Tregs offered therapeutic promise for autoimmune disorders. However, the failed TGN1412 trial forced reassessment of this concept. As memory CD4(+) T cells are known to produce toxic molecules, including granzyme B (GrzB) and FasL, we wondered whether mitogenic CD28 was able to induce these cytotoxic molecules. A commercially available mitogenic human CD28 mAb (clone ANC28.1) was used to determine whether mitogenic CD28 induces cytotoxic function from human memory CD4(+) T cells. We found that stimulation of memory CD4(+) T cells by ANC28.1, as well as by conventional costimulation (CD3/CD28 mAb), robustly induced enzymatically active GrzB, along with increased surface expression of FasL. These functional phenotypes were induced in association with increased expression of T cell activation markers CD69 and CD25, and elimination of target cells by ANC28.1-activated memory CD4(+) T cells involved both GrzB and FasL. Additionally, ANC28.1-activated memory CD4(+) T cells caused disruption of epithelial cell monolayer integrity, which was partially mediated by GrzB. These findings reveal functions of memory CD4(+) T cells previously unknown to be induced by mitogenic CD28, and suggest that these pathogenic mechanisms may have been responsible for some of the widespread tissue destruction that occurred in the TGN1412 trial recipients.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.