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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Bayesian inferences suggest that Amazon Yunga Natives diverged from Andeans less than 5000 ybp: implications for South American prehistory.
BMC Evol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2014
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BackgroundArchaeology reports millenary cultural contacts between Peruvian Coast-Andes and the Amazon Yunga, a rainforest transitional region between Andes and Lower Amazonia. To clarify the relationships between cultural and biological evolution of these populations, in particular between Amazon Yungas and Andeans, we used DNA-sequence data, a model-based Bayesian approach and several statistical validations to infer a set of demographic parameters.ResultsWe found that the genetic diversity of the Shimaa (an Amazon Yunga population) is a subset of that of Quechuas from Central-Andes. Using the Isolation-with-Migration population genetics model, we inferred that the Shimaa ancestors were a small subgroup that split less than 5300 years ago (after the development of complex societies) from an ancestral Andean population. After the split, the most plausible scenario compatible with our results is that the ancestors of Shimaas moved toward the Peruvian Amazon Yunga and incorporated the culture and language of some of their neighbors, but not a substantial amount of their genes. We validated our results using Approximate Bayesian Computations, posterior predictive tests and the analysis of pseudo-observed datasets.ConclusionsWe presented a case study in which model-based Bayesian approaches, combined with necessary statistical validations, shed light into the prehistoric demographic relationship between Andeans and a population from the Amazon Yunga. Our results offer a testable model for the peopling of this large transitional environmental region between the Andes and the Lower Amazonia. However, studies on larger samples and involving more populations of these regions are necessary to confirm if the predominant Andean biological origin of the Shimaas is the rule, and not the exception.
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Population Genetic Analyses of Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Gambian Adults and Children.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is one of the most genetically diverse of bacterial species. Much of its diversity stems from frequent mutation and recombination, preferential transmission within families and local communities, and selection during persistent gastric mucosal infection. MLST of seven housekeeping genes had identified multiple distinct H. pylori populations, including three from Africa: hpNEAfrica, hpAfrica1 and hpAfrica2, which consists of three subpopulations (hspWAfrica, hspCAfrica and hspSAfrica). Most detailed H. pylori population analyses have used strains from non-African countries, despite Africa's high importance in the emergence and evolution of humans and their pathogens. Our concatenated sequences from seven H. pylori housekeeping genes from 44 Gambian patients (MLST) identified 42 distinct sequence types (or haplotypes), and no clustering with age or disease. STRUCTURE analysis of the sequence data indicated that Gambian H. pylori strains belong to the hspWAfrica subpopulation of hpAfrica1, in accord with Gambia's West African location. Despite Gambia's history of invasion and colonisation by Europeans and North Africans during the last millennium, no traces of Ancestral Europe1 (AE1) population carried by those people were found. Instead, admixture of 17% from Ancestral Europe2 (AE2) was detected in Gambian strains; this population predominates in Nilo-Saharan speakers of North-East Africa, and might have been derived from admixture of hpNEAfrica strains these people carried when they migrated across the Sahara during the Holocene humid period 6,000-9,000 years ago. Alternatively, shared AE2 ancestry might have resulted from shared ancestral polymorphisms already present in the common ancestor of sister populations hpAfrica1 and hpNEAfrica.
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Systematic analysis of phosphotyrosine antibodies recognizing single phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs in CagA of Western-type Helicobacter pylori strains.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infections is determined by multiple host-pathogen interactions that may develop to chronic gastritis, and sometimes peptic ulcers or gastric cancer. Highly virulent strains encode a type IV secretion system (T4SS) that delivers the effector protein CagA into gastric epithelial cells. Translocated CagA undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation at EPIYA-sequence motifs, called A, B and C in Western-type strains, by members of the oncogenic Src and Abl host kinases. Phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs mediate interactions of CagA with host signaling factors--in particular various SH2-domain containing human proteins--thereby hijacking multiple downstream signaling cascades. Observations of tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA are mainly based on the use of commercial phosphotyrosine antibodies, which originally were selected to detect phosphotyrosines in mammalian proteins. Systematic studies of phosphorylated EPIYA-motif detection by the different antibodies would be very useful, but are not yet available. To address this issue, we synthesized phospho- and non-phosphopeptides representing each predominant Western CagA EPIYA-motif, and determined the recognition patterns of seven different phosphotyrosine antibodies in Western blots, and also performed infection studies with diverse representative Western H. pylori strains. Our results show that a total of 9-11 amino acids containing the phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs are necessary and sufficient for specific detection by these antibodies, but revealed great variability in sequence recognition. Three of the antibodies recognized phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs A, B and C similarly well; whereas preferential binding to phosphorylated motif A and motifs A and C was found with two and one antibodies, respectively, and the seventh anti-phosphotyrosine antibody did not recognize any phosphorylated EPIYA-motif. Controls showed that none of the antibodies recognized the corresponding non-phospho CagA peptides, and that all of them recognized phosphotyrosines in mammalian proteins. These data are valuable in judicious application of commercial anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies and in characterization of CagA phosphorylation during infection and disease development.
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Expanded therapeutic potential in activity space of next-generation 5-nitroimidazole antimicrobials with broad structural diversity.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2013
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Metronidazole and other 5-nitroimidazoles (5-NI) are among the most effective antimicrobials available against many important anaerobic pathogens, but evolving resistance is threatening their long-term clinical utility. The common 5-NIs were developed decades ago, yet little 5-NI drug development has since taken place, leaving the true potential of this important drug class unexplored. Here we report on a unique approach to the modular synthesis of diversified 5-NIs for broad exploration of their antimicrobial potential. Many of the more than 650 synthesized compounds, carrying structurally diverse functional groups, have vastly improved activity against a range of microbes, including the pathogenic protozoa Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, and the bacterial pathogens Helicobacter pylori, Clostridium difficile, and Bacteroides fragilis. Furthermore, they can overcome different forms of drug resistance, and are active and nontoxic in animal infection models. These findings provide impetus to the development of structurally diverse, next-generation 5-NI drugs as agents in the antimicrobial armamentarium, thus ensuring their future viability as primary therapeutic agents against many clinically important infections.
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Genome Sequences of Three hpAfrica2 Strains of Helicobacter pylori.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 09-28-2013
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We present the genome sequences of three hpAfrica2 strains of Helicobacter pylori, which are postulated to have evolved in isolation for many millennia in people of San ethnicity. Although previously considered to be ancestral to Helicobacter acinonychis, the hpAfrica2 strains differ markedly from H. acinonychis in their gene arrangement. These data provide new insights into Helicobacter evolution.
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Robustness of Helicobacter pylori infection conferred by context-variable redundancy among cysteine-rich paralogs.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2013
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Deletion of single genes from expanded gene families in bacterial genomes often does not elicit a phenotype thus implying redundancy or functional non-essentiality of paralogous genes. The molecular mechanisms that facilitate evolutionary maintenance of such paralogs despite selective pressures against redundancy remain mostly unexplored. Here, we investigate the evolutionary, genetic, and functional interaction between the Helicobacter pylori cysteine-rich paralogs hcpG and hcpC in the context of H. pylori infection of cultured mammalian cells. We find that in natural H. pylori populations both hcpG and hcpC are maintained by positive selection in a dual genetic relationship that switches from complete redundancy during early infection, whereby ?hcpC or ?hcpG mutants themselves show no growth defect but a significant growth defect is seen in the ?hcpC,?hcpG double mutant, to quantitative redundancy during late infection wherein the growth defect of the ?hcpC mutant is exacerbated in the ?hcpC,?hcpG double mutant although the ?hcpG mutant itself shows no defect. Moreover, during early infection both hcpG and hcpC are essential for optimal translocation of the H. pylori HspB/GroEL chaperone, but during middle-to-late infection hcpC alone is necessary and sufficient for HspB/GroEL translocation thereby revealing the lack of functional compensation among paralogs. We propose that evolution of context-dependent differences in the nature of genetic redundancy, and function, between hcpG and hcpC may facilitate their maintenance in H. pylori genomes, and confer robustness to H. pylori growth during infection of cultured mammalian cells.
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Sequence Divergence and Conservation in Genomes ofHelicobacter cetorum Strains from a Dolphin and a Whale.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Strains of Helicobacter cetorum have been cultured from several marine mammals and have been found to be closely related in 16 S rDNA sequence to the human gastric pathogen H. pylori, but their genomes were not characterized further.
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Electron microscopic, genetic and protein expression analyses of Helicobacter acinonychis strains from a Bengal tiger.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Colonization by Helicobacter species is commonly noted in many mammals. These infections often remain unrecognized, but can cause severe health complications or more subtle host immune perturbations. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize putative novel Helicobacter spp. from Bengal tigers in Thailand. Morphological investigation (Gram-staining and electron microscopy) and genetic studies (16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, flagellin, urease and prophage gene analyses, RAPD DNA fingerprinting and restriction fragment polymorphisms) as well as Western blotting were used to characterize the isolated Helicobacters. Electron microscopy revealed spiral-shaped bacteria, which varied in length (2.5-6 µm) and contained up to four monopolar sheathed flagella. The 16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, sequencing and protein expression analyses identified novel H. acinonychis isolates closely related to H. pylori. These Asian isolates are genetically very similar to H. acinonychis strains of other big cats (cheetahs, lions, lion-tiger hybrid and other tigers) from North America and Europe, which is remarkable in the context of the great genetic diversity among worldwide H. pylori strains. We also found by immunoblotting that the Bengal tiger isolates express UreaseA/B, flagellin, BabA adhesin, neutrophil-activating protein NapA, HtrA protease, ?-glutamyl-transpeptidase GGT, Slt lytic transglycosylase and two DNA transfer relaxase orthologs that were known from H. pylori, but not the cag pathogenicity island, nor CagA, VacA, SabA, DupA or OipA proteins. These results give fresh insights into H. acinonychis genetics and the expression of potential pathogenicity-associated factors and their possible pathophysiological relevance in related gastric infections.
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Helicobacter pylori genotyping from American indigenous groups shows novel Amerindian vacA and cagA alleles and Asian, African and European admixture.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 10-12-2011
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It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D), Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America.
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Mixed infection with cagA positive and cagA negative strains of Helicobacter pylori lowers disease burden in The Gambia.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2011
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The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori including strains with putatively virulent genotypes is high, whereas the H. pylori-associated disease burden is low, in Africa compared to developed countries. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of virulence-related H. pylori genotypes and their association with gastroduodenal diseases in The Gambia.
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Attenuated CagA oncoprotein in Helicobacter pylori from Amerindians in Peruvian Amazon.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2011
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Population genetic analyses of bacterial genes whose products interact with host tissues can give new understanding of infection and disease processes. Here we show that strains of the genetically diverse gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori from Amerindians from the remote Peruvian Amazon contain novel alleles of cagA, a major virulence gene, and reveal distinctive properties of their encoded CagA proteins. CagA is injected into the gastric epithelium where it hijacks pleiotropic signaling pathways, helps Hp exploit its special gastric mucosal niche, and affects the risk that infection will result in overt gastroduodenal diseases including gastric cancer. The Amerindian CagA proteins contain unusual but functional tyrosine phosphorylation motifs and attenuated CRPIA motifs, which affect gastric epithelial proliferation, inflammation, and bacterial pathogenesis. Amerindian CagA proteins induced less production of IL-8 and cancer-associated Mucin 2 than did those of prototype Western or East Asian strains and behaved as dominant negative inhibitors of action of prototype CagA during mixed infection of Mongolian gerbils. We suggest that Amerindian cagA is of relatively low virulence, that this may have been selected in ancestral strains during infection of the people who migrated from Asia into the Americas many thousands of years ago, and that such attenuated CagA proteins could be useful therapeutically.
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PCR-based genotyping of Helicobacter pylori of Gambian children and adults directly from biopsy specimens and bacterial cultures.
Gut Pathog
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2011
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Helicobacter pylori is an important agent of gastroduodenal disease in Africa and throughout the world. We sought to determine an optimum method for genotyping H. pylori strains from children and adults in The Gambia, West Africa.
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Point mutations in Helicobacter pyloris fur regulatory gene that alter resistance to metronidazole, a prodrug activated by chemical reduction.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2011
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Helicobacter pyloris Fur regulatory protein controls transcription of dozens of genes in response to iron availability, acidity and oxidative stress, and affects the vigor of infection and severity of disease. It is unusual among Fur family proteins in being active both when iron-loaded and iron-free. METHOLODOLGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested if H. pylori fur mutations could affect resistance to metronidazole (Mtz), an anti-H. pylori prodrug rendered bactericidal by chemical reduction. Point mutations were made by PCR in DNA containing fur and a downstream chloramphenicol resistance gene, and were placed in the H. pylori chromosome by transformation of a fur-deletion (?fur) strain. Several substitutions affecting H. pylori Furs ?10 residue N terminal arm, which has no counterpart in prototype (E. coli-type) Fur proteins, increased Mtz resistance, as did mutations affecting the region between DNA binding and dimerization domains. Three types of mutations decreased resistance more than did ?fur: substitutions affecting the N-terminal arm; substitutions affecting the metal binding pocket; and nonsense mutations that resulted in a truncated Fur protein with no C-terminal dimerization domain. Most metal binding pocket mutations were obtained only in fur genes with additional inactivating mutations, and thus seemed deleterious or lethal because they.
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A worldwide analysis of beta-defensin copy number variation suggests recent selection of a high-expressing DEFB103 gene copy in East Asia.
Hum. Mutat.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2011
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Beta-defensins are a family of multifunctional genes with roles in defense against pathogens, reproduction, and pigmentation. In humans, six beta-defensin genes are clustered in a repeated region which is copy-number variable (CNV) as a block, with a diploid copy number between 1 and 12. The role in host defense makes the evolutionary history of this CNV particularly interesting, because morbidity due to infectious disease is likely to have been an important selective force in human evolution, and to have varied between geographical locations. Here, we show CNV of the beta-defensin region in chimpanzees, and identify a beta-defensin block in the human lineage that contains rapidly evolving noncoding regulatory sequences. We also show that variation at one of these rapidly evolving sequences affects expression levels and cytokine responsiveness of DEFB103, a key inhibitor of influenza virus fusion at the cell surface. A worldwide analysis of beta-defensin CNV in 67 populations shows an unusually high frequency of high-DEFB103-expressing copies in East Asia, the geographical origin of historical and modern influenza epidemics, possibly as a result of selection for increased resistance to influenza in this region.
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Helicobacter pylori from Peruvian amerindians: traces of human migrations in strains from remote Amazon, and genome sequence of an Amerind strain.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2010
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The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is extraordinary in its genetic diversity, the differences between strains from well-separated human populations, and the range of diseases that infection promotes.
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Surface properties of Helicobacter pylori urease complex are essential for persistence.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-13-2010
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The enzymatic activity of Helicobacter pyloris urease neutralises stomach acidity, thereby promoting infection by this pathogen. Urease protein has also been found to interact with host cells in vitro, although this propertys possible functional importance has not been studied in vivo. To test for a role of the urease surface in the host/pathogen interaction, surface exposed loops that display high thermal mobility were targeted for inframe insertion mutagenesis. H. pylori expressing urease with insertions at four of eight sites tested retained urease activity, which in three cases was at least as stable as was wild-type urease at pH 3. Bacteria expressing one of these four mutant ureases, however, failed to colonise mice for even two weeks, and a second had reduced bacterial titres after longer term (3 to 6 months) colonisation. These results indicate that a discrete surface of the urease complex is important for H. pylori persistence during gastric colonisation. We propose that this surface interacts directly with host components important for the host-pathogen interaction, immune modulation or other actions that underlie H. pylori persistence in its special gastric mucosal niche.
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Intact cag pathogenicity island of Helicobacter pylori without disease association in Kolkata, India.
Int. J. Med. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2010
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Several genes including the cagA in the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) of Helicobacter pylori are thought to be associated with the gastroduodenal diseases and hence variation in the genetic structure of the cag PAI might be responsible for different clinical outcomes. Our study was undertaken to characterize the cag PAI of H. pylori strains from duodenal ulcer (DU) patients and asymptomatic or non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD/AV) subjects from Kolkata, India. Strains isolated from 52 individuals (30DU and 22NUD/AV) were analyzed by PCR using 83 different primers for the entire cag PAI and also by dot-blot hybridization. Unlike H. pylori strains isolated from other parts of India, 82.6% of the strains used in this study had intact cag PAI, 9.6% had partially deleted cag PAI, and 7.7% of the strains lacked the entire cag PAI. Dot-blot hybridization yielded positive signals in 100% and 93.8% of PCR-negative strains for HP0522-523 and HP0532-HP0534 genes, respectively. An intact cagA promoter region was also detected in all cagA-positive strains. Furthermore, the expression of cagA mRNA was confirmed by RT-PCR for the representative strains from both DU and NUD/AV subjects indicating the active cagA promoter regions of these strains. A total of 66.7% of Kolkata strains produced a ?390-bp shorter amplicon than the standard strain 26695 for the HP0527 gene, homologue of virB10. However, sequence analyses confirmed that the deletion did not alter the reading frame of the gene, and mRNA transcripts were detected by RT-PCR analysis. The strains isolated from DU and NUD/AV express CagA protein and possess a functional type IV secretion system, as revealed by Western blot analyses. Interestingly, no significant differences in cag PAI genetic structure were found between DU and NUD/AV individuals suggesting that other bacterial virulence factors, host susceptibility, and environmental determinants also influence the disease outcome at least in certain geographical locations.
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Differences in public belief and reality in the care of operative patients in a teaching hospital.
J Surg Educ
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2010
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The accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) restricts residents from working more than 80 hours per week averaged over a 4-week period. No such restriction exists, however, for attending surgeons. Little exploration has been done of the publics perception of the number of hours that surgeons work and how residents work with the staff surgeons at a teaching institution.
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Expression of the BabA adhesin during experimental infection with Helicobacter pylori.
Infect. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2010
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The Helicobacter pylori babA gene encodes an outer membrane protein that mediates binding to fucosylated ABH antigens of the ABO blood group. We recently demonstrated that BabA expression is lost during experimental infection of rhesus macaques with H. pylori J166. We sought to test the generality of this observation by comparison of different H. pylori strains and different animal hosts. Challenge of macaques with H. pylori J99 yielded output strains that lost BabA expression, either by selection and then expansion of a subpopulation of J99 that had a single-base-pair mutation that encoded a stop codon or by gene conversion of babA with a duplicate copy of babB, a paralog of unknown function. Challenge of mice with H. pylori J166, which unlike J99, has 5 CT repeats in babA, resulted in loss of BabA expression due to phase variation. In the gerbil, Leb binding was lost by replacement of the babA gene that encoded Leb binding with a nonbinding allele that differed at six amino acid residues. Complementation experiments confirmed that change in these six amino acids of BabA was sufficient to eliminate binding to Leb and to gastric tissue. These results demonstrate that BabA expression in vivo is highly dynamic, and the findings implicate specific amino acid residues as critical for binding to fucosylated ABH antigens. We hypothesize that modification of BabA expression during H. pylori infection is a mechanism to adapt to changing conditions of inflammation and glycan expression at the epithelial surface.
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Interleukin-1 beta single-nucleotide polymorphisms C allele is associated with elevated risk of gastric cancer in Helicobacter pylori-infected Peruvians.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 10-29-2009
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Particular alleles of the interleukin-1B (IL-1B) gene have been correlated with increased risk of atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer in the populations of East Asia and Europe. No such data exist from Peru, a developing country with a population genotypically different from others studied and with a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer. We conducted a case-control study comparing 334 hospitalized patients with atrophic gastritis or gastric cancer with 158 nonatrophic gastritis patients (controls). Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that an increased risk of atrophic gastritis (odds ratio, 5.60) and gastric cancer (odds ratio, 2.36) was associated with the IL-1B-511 C allele. Our study is the first to establish this allele as a risk for these conditions. Given the high prevalence of H. pylori and recurrence rate after treatment, IL-1B-511 single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis may identify those individuals who would benefit most from robust H. pylori eradication efforts in Peru.
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Helicobacter Pyloris plasticity zones are novel transposable elements.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2009
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Genes present in only certain strains of a bacterial species can strongly affect cellular phenotypes and evolutionary potentials. One segment that seemed particularly rich in strain-specific genes was found by comparing the first two sequenced Helicobacter pylori genomes (strains 26695 and J99) and was named a "plasticity zone".
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The secreted Helicobacter cysteine-rich protein A causes adherence of human monocytes and differentiation into a macrophage-like phenotype.
FEBS Lett.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2009
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Helicobacter pylori genomes typically contain 8 or 9 genes that code for secreted and highly disulfide-bridged proteins designated Helicobacter cysteine-rich proteins (Hcp). Here we show that HcpA (hp0211) but not HcpC (hp1098) triggers the differentiation of human myeloid Thp1 monocytes into macrophages. Small amounts of HcpA cause the transition of round-shaped monocytes into cells with star-like morphologies, adherence to the culture dish surface, phagocytosis of opsonized fluorescent microspheres, and expression of the surface marker protein CD11b, all of which are indicative of a macrophage-like phenotype. We conclude that HcpA acts as a bacterial immune modulator similar to a eukaryotic cytokine.
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Helicobacter pylori CagA phosphorylation-independent function in epithelial proliferation and inflammation.
Cell Host Microbe
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2009
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CagA, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori (Hp), is delivered into gastric epithelial cells and exists in phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated forms. The biological activity of the phosphorylated form is well established; however, function(s) of the nonphosphorylated form remain elusive. Here, we report that a conserved motif in the C-terminal region of CagA, which is distinct from the EPIYA motifs used for phosphorylation and which we designate CRPIA (conserved repeat responsible for phosphorylation-independent activity), plays pivotal roles in Hp pathogenesis. The CRPIA motif in nonphosphorylated CagA was involved in interacting with activated Met, the hepatocyte growth factor receptor, leading to the sustained activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling in response to Hp infection. This in turn led to the activation of beta-catenin and NF-kappaB signaling, which promote proliferation and inflammation, respectively. Thus, nonphosphorylated CagA activity contributes to the epithelial proliferative and proinflammatory responses associated with development of chronic gastritis and gastric cancer.
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Antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance patterns among Helicobacter pylori strains from The Gambia, West Africa.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
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Helicobacter pylori is a globally important and genetically diverse gastric pathogen that infects most people in developing countries. Eradication efforts are complicated by antibiotic resistance, which varies in frequency geographically. There are very few data on resistance in African strains. Sixty-four Gambian H. pylori strains were tested for antibiotic susceptibility. The role of rdxA in metronidazole (Mtz) susceptibility was tested by DNA transformation and sequencing; RdxA protein variants were interpreted in terms of RdxA structure. Forty-four strains (69%) were resistant to at least 8 ?g of Mtz/ml. All six strains from infants, but only 24% of strains from adults, were sensitive (P = 0.0031). Representative Mtz-resistant (Mtz(r)) strains were rendered Mtz susceptible (Mtz(s)) by transformation with a functional rdxA gene; conversely, Mtz(s) strains were rendered Mtz(r) by rdxA inactivation. Many mutations were found by Gambian H. pylori rdxA sequencing; mutations that probably inactivated rdxA in Mtz(r) strains were identified and explained using RdxA proteins structure. All of the strains were sensitive to clarithromycin and erythromycin. Amoxicillin and tetracycline resistance was rare. Sequence analysis indicated that most tetracycline resistance, when found, was not due to 16S rRNA gene mutations. These data suggest caution in the use of Mtz-based therapies in The Gambia. The increasing use of macrolides against respiratory infections in The Gambia calls for continued antibiotic susceptibility monitoring. The rich variety of rdxA mutations that we found will be useful in further structure-function studies of RdxA, the enzyme responsible for Mtz susceptibility in this important pathogen.
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Evolution of Helicobacter pylori susceptibility to antibiotics during a 10-year period in Lithuania.
APMIS
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The study evaluated the changes in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori strains with primary resistance to antibiotics during the last 10 years in Lithuania. H. pylori susceptibilities to antibiotics were tested in 89 patients in 1998, in 81 patients in 2001 and in 90 patients in 2007/2008. Susceptibility to metronidazole, clarithromycin, amoxicillin and tetracycline was tested using E-test or agar dilution method. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was only tested in 2007/2008. Data about utilization of all authorized and available on market macrolides and clindamycin in Lithuania during 2003-2007 were evaluated using WHO ATC/DDD methodology. A total of 260 H. pylori strains cultured from untreated adult patients were investigated. Primary resistance rates (1998, 2001 and 2007/2008) for metronidazole were 24.7%, 33.3%, and 35.6%, for clarithromycin 1.1%, 3.7%, and 3.3% and for tetracycline 0%, 2.5% and 0% respectively. No cases of amoxicillin resistance have been detected. The resistance rate for ciprofloxacin was 5.6% in 2007/2008. Data of total macrolides and clarithromycin utilization in Lithuania revealed that despite an increase of consumption of these drugs in Lithuania during 2003-2007 in 1.5 times, the total macrolide consumption remains one of the lowest in Europe. We have not observed any significant changes in the susceptibility of H. pylori to the most widely used antibiotics during the recent 10-year period. The low resistance rate to clarithromycin might be related to the policy to avoid use of macrolides as first-line treatment for pulmonary and other infections.
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Socioeconomic and nutritional factors account for the association of gastric cancer with Amerindian ancestry in a Latin American admixed population.
PLoS ONE
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Gastric cancer is one of the most lethal types of cancer and its incidence varies worldwide, with the Andean region of South America showing high incidence rates. We evaluated the genetic structure of the population from Lima (Peru) and performed a case-control genetic association study to test the contribution of African, European, or Native American ancestry to risk for gastric cancer, controlling for the effect of non-genetic factors. A wide set of socioeconomic, dietary, and clinic information was collected for each participant in the study and ancestry was estimated based on 103 ancestry informative markers. Although the urban population from Lima is usually considered as mestizo (i.e., admixed from Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans), we observed a high fraction of Native American ancestry (78.4% for the cases and 74.6% for the controls) and a very low African ancestry (<5%). We determined that higher Native American individual ancestry is associated with gastric cancer, but socioeconomic factors associated both with gastric cancer and Native American ethnicity account for this association. Therefore, the high incidence of gastric cancer in Peru does not seem to be related to susceptibility alleles common in this population. Instead, our result suggests a predominant role for ethnic-associated socioeconomic factors and disparities in access to health services. Since Native Americans are a neglected group in genomic studies, we suggest that the population from Lima and other large cities from Western South America with high Native American ancestry background may be convenient targets for epidemiological studies focused on this ethnic group.
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Distinct repeat motifs at the C-terminal region of CagA of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from diseased patients and asymptomatic individuals in West Bengal, India.
Gut Pathog
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Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains that express CagA is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The biological function of CagA depends on tyrosine phosphorylation by a cellular kinase. The phosphate acceptor tyrosine moiety is present within the EPIYA motif at the C-terminal region of the protein. This region is highly polymorphic due to variations in the number of EPIYA motifs and the polymorphism found in spacer regions among EPIYA motifs. The aim of this study was to analyze the polymorphism at the C-terminal end of CagA and to evaluate its association with the clinical status of the host in West Bengal, India.
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Xer recombinase and genome integrity in Helicobacter pylori, a pathogen without topoisomerase IV.
PLoS ONE
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In the model organism E. coli, recombination mediated by the related XerC and XerD recombinases complexed with the FtsK translocase at specialized dif sites, resolves dimeric chromosomes into free monomers to allow efficient chromosome segregation at cell division. Computational genome analysis of Helicobacter pylori, a slow growing gastric pathogen, identified just one chromosomal xer gene (xerH) and its cognate dif site (difH). Here we show that recombination between directly repeated difH sites requires XerH, FtsK but not XerT, the TnPZ transposon associated recombinase. xerH inactivation was not lethal, but resulted in increased DNA per cell, suggesting defective chromosome segregation. The xerH mutant also failed to colonize mice, and was more susceptible to UV and ciprofloxacin, which induce DNA breakage, and thereby recombination and chromosome dimer formation. xerH inactivation and overexpression each led to a DNA segregation defect, suggesting a role for Xer recombination in regulation of replication. In addition to chromosome dimer resolution and based on the absence of genes for topoisomerase IV (parC, parE) in H. pylori, we speculate that XerH may contribute to chromosome decatenation, although possible involvement of H. pyloris DNA gyrase and topoisomerase III homologue are also considered. Further analyses of this system should contribute to general understanding of and possibly therapy development for H. pylori, which causes peptic ulcers and gastric cancer; for the closely related, diarrheagenic Campylobacter species; and for unrelated slow growing pathogens that lack topoisomerase IV, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
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