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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Association between Morphologic CT Imaging Traits and Prognostically Relevant Gene Signatures in Women with High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer: A Hypothesis-generating Study.
Radiology
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2014
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Purpose To investigate associations among imaging traits observed on computed tomographic (CT) images, Classification of Ovarian Cancer ( CLOVAR Classification of Ovarian Cancer ) gene signatures, and survival in women with high-grade serous ovarian cancer ( HGSOC high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma ). Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study of CT images obtained before cytoreductive surgery in 46 women with HGSOC high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma , whose tumors were subjected to molecular analysis performed by the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network. Two readers independently evaluated the CT features of the primary ovarian mass and sites of metastatic spread if present, including size, outline, and texture. Fisher exact test was used to examine the relationship between imaging traits and CLOVAR Classification of Ovarian Cancer subtypes ( CLOVAR Classification of Ovarian Cancer differentiated, immunoreactive, mesenchymal, and proliferative). Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression survival analyses were performed. Results The presence of mesenteric infiltration and diffuse peritoneal involvement by tumor at CT were significantly associated with CLOVAR Classification of Ovarian Cancer subtype (P = .002-.004 for reader 1 and P = .005-.012 for reader 2). Mesenteric infiltration at CT was associated with CLOVAR Classification of Ovarian Cancer mesenchymal subtype. Patients with mesenteric infiltration had shorter median progression-free survival than patients without mesenteric involvement (14.7 months vs 25.6 months according to both readers; P = .019 for reader 1 and .015 for reader 2) and overall survival (49.0 vs 58.2 months; P = .014 [reader 1] and 50.0 vs 59.1 months; P = .015 [reader 2]). No other imaging features were significantly associated with CLOVAR Classification of Ovarian Cancer subtype or survival. Conclusion Specific CT imaging traits were associated with the CLOVAR Classification of Ovarian Cancer subtypes and survival in patients with HGSOC high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma . © RSNA, 2014.
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Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of Ovarian and Breast Cancer Tumor Peptidomes.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-29-2014
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Aberrant degradation of proteins is associated with many pathological states, including cancers. Mass spectrometric analysis of tumor peptidomes, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide biological insights on proteolytic processing in cancer. However, attempts to use the information on these smaller protein degradation products from tumors for biomarker discovery and cancer biology studies have been fairly limited to date, largely due to the lack of effective approaches for robust peptidomics identification and quantification and the prevalence of confounding factors and biases associated with sample handling and processing. Herein, we have developed an effective and robust analytical platform for comprehensive analyses of tissue peptidomes, which is suitable for high-throughput quantitative studies. The reproducibility and coverage of the platform, as well as the suitability of clinical ovarian tumor and patient-derived breast tumor xenograft samples with postexcision delay of up to 60 min before freezing for peptidomics analysis, have been demonstrated. Moreover, our data also show that the peptidomics profiles can effectively separate breast cancer subtypes, reflecting tumor-associated protease activities. Peptidomics complements results obtainable from conventional bottom-up proteomics and provides insights not readily obtainable from such approaches.
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UNDO: a Bioconductor R package for unsupervised deconvolution of mixed gene expressions in tumor samples.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2014
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We develop a novel unsupervised deconvolution method, within a well-grounded mathematical framework, to dissect mixed gene expressions in heterogeneous tumor samples. We implement an R package, UNsupervised DecOnvolution (UNDO), that can be used to automatically detect cell-specific marker genes (MGs) located on the scatter radii of mixed gene expressions, estimate cellular proportions in each sample and deconvolute mixed expressions into cell-specific expression profiles. We demonstrate the performance of UNDO over a wide range of tumor-stroma mixing proportions, validate UNDO on various biologically mixed benchmark gene expression datasets and further estimate tumor purity in TCGA/CPTAC datasets. The highly accurate deconvolution results obtained suggest not only the existence of cell-specific MGs but also UNDO's ability to detect them blindly and correctly. Although the principal application here involves microarray gene expressions, our methodology can be readily applied to other types of quantitative molecular profiling data. Availability and implementation: UNDO is available at http://bioconductor.org/packages.
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Clinical significance of CTNNB1 mutation and Wnt pathway activation in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2014
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Endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EEC) is the most common form of endometrial carcinoma. The heterogeneous clinical course of EEC is an obstacle to individualized patient care.
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Clinicopathological analysis of endometrial carcinomas harboring somatic POLE exonuclease domain mutations.
Mod. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2014
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The Cancer Genome Atlas described four major genomic groups of endometrial carcinomas, including a POLE ultramutated subtype comprising ?10% of endometrioid adenocarcinoma, characterized by POLE exonuclease domain mutations, ultrahigh somatic mutation rates, and favorable outcome. Our aim was to examine the morphological and clinicopathological features of ultramutated endometrial carcinomas harboring somatic POLE exonuclease domain mutations. Hematoxylin and eosin slides and pathology reports for 8/17 POLE-mutated endometrial carcinomas described in the Cancer Genome Atlas study were studied; for the remaining cases, virtual whole slide images publicly available at cBioPortal (www.cbioportal.org) were examined. A second cohort of eight POLE mutated endometrial carcinomas from University of Calgary was also studied. Median age was 55 years (range 33-87 years). Nineteen patients presented as stage I, 1 stage II, and 5 stage III. The majority of cases (24 of the 25) demonstrated defining morphological features of endometrioid differentiation. The studied cases were frequently high grade (60%) and rich in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and/or peri-tumoral lymphocytes (84%); many tumors showed morphological heterogeneity (52%) and ambiguity (16%). Foci demonstrating severe nuclear atypia led to concern for serous carcinoma in 28% of cases. At the molecular level, the majority of the Cancer Genome Atlas POLE-mutated tumors were microsatellite stable (65%), and TP53 mutations were present in 35% of cases. They also harbored mutations in PTEN (94%), FBXW7 (82%), ARID1A (76%), and PIK3CA (71%). All patients from both cohorts were alive without disease, and none of the patients developed recurrence at the time of follow-up (median 33 months; range 2-102 months). In conclusion, the recognition of ultramutated endometrial carcinomas with POLE exonuclease domain mutation is important given their favorable outcome. Our histopathological review revealed that these tumors are commonly high grade, have obvious lymphocytic infiltrates, and can show ambiguous morphology. As they frequently harbor TP53 mutations, it is important not to misclassify them as serous carcinoma.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 14 November 2014; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2014.143.
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Comparison of outcomes in early stage uterine carcinosarcoma and uterine serous carcinoma.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2014
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To assess whether contemporary adjuvant management of early stage uterine carcinosarcoma (CS) produces equal outcomes as in uterine serous carcinoma (USC).
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DIRAS3 regulates the autophagosome initiation complex in dormant ovarian cancer cells.
Autophagy
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2014
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DIRAS3 is an imprinted tumor suppressor gene that is downregulated in 60% of human ovarian cancers. Re-expression of DIRAS3 at physiological levels inhibits proliferation, decreases motility, induces autophagy, and regulates tumor dormancy. Functional inhibition of autophagy with choroquine in dormant xenografts that express DIRAS3 significantly delays tumor regrowth after DIRAS3 levels are reduced, suggesting that autophagy sustains dormant ovarian cancer cells. This study documents a newly discovered role for DIRAS3 in forming the autophagosome initiation complex (AIC) that contains BECN1, PIK3C3, PIK3R4, ATG14, and DIRAS3. Participation of BECN1 in the AIC is inhibited by binding of BECN1 homodimers to BCL2. DIRAS3 binds BECN1, disrupting BECN1 homodimers and displacing BCL2. Binding of DIRAS3 to BECN1 increases the association of BECN1 with PIK3C3 and ATG14, facilitating AIC activation. Amino acid starvation of cells induces DIRAS3 expression, reduces BECN1-BCL2 interaction and promotes autophagy, whereas DIRAS3 depletion blocks amino acid starvation-induced autophagy. In primary ovarian cancers, punctate expression of DIRAS3, BECN1, and the autophagic biomarker MAP1LC3 are highly correlated (P<0.0001), underlining the clinical relevance of these mechanistic studies. Punctate expression of DIRAS3 and MAP1LC3 was detected in only 21-23% of primary ovarian cancers but in 81-84% of tumor nodules found on the peritoneal surface at second-look operations following primary chemotherapy. This reflects a 4-fold increase (P<0.0001) in autophagy between primary disease and post-treatment recurrence. We suggest that DIRAS3 not only regulates the AIC, but induces autophagy in dormant, nutrient-deprived ovarian cancer cells that remain after conventional chemotherapy, facilitating their survival.
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Blocking and randomization to improve molecular biomarker discovery.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2014
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Randomization and blocking have the potential to prevent the negative impacts of nonbiologic effects on molecular biomarker discovery. Their use in practice, however, has been scarce. To demonstrate the logistic feasibility and scientific benefits of randomization and blocking, we conducted a microRNA study of endometrial tumors (n = 96) and ovarian tumors (n = 96) using a blocked randomization design to control for nonbiologic effects; we profiled the same set of tumors for a second time using no blocking or randomization. We assessed empirical evidence of differential expression in the two studies. We performed simulations through virtual rehybridizations to further evaluate the effects of blocking and randomization. There was moderate and asymmetric differential expression (351/3,523, 10%) between endometrial and ovarian tumors in the randomized dataset. Nonbiologic effects were observed in the nonrandomized dataset, and 1,934 markers (55%) were called differentially expressed. Among them, 185 were deemed differentially expressed (185/351, 53%) and 1,749 not differentially expressed (1,749/3,172, 55%) in the randomized dataset. In simulations, when randomization was applied to all samples at once or within batches of samples balanced in tumor groups, blocking improved the true-positive rate from 0.95 to 0.97 and the false-positive rate from 0.02 to 0.002; when sample batches were unbalanced, randomization was associated with the true-positive rate (0.92) and the false-positive rate (0.10) regardless of blocking. Normalization improved the detection of true-positive markers but still retained sizeable false-positive markers. Randomization and blocking should be used in practice to more fully reap the benefits of genomics technologies.
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Variation in NF-?B signaling pathways and survival in invasive epithelial ovarian cancer.
Matthew S Block, Bridget Charbonneau, Robert A Vierkant, Zachary Fogarty, William R Bamlet, Paul D P Pharoah, , Mary Anne Rossing, Daniel Cramer, Celeste Leigh Pearce, Joellen Schildkraut, Usha Menon, Susanne K Kjaer, Douglas A Levine, Jacek Gronwald, Hoda Anton Culver, Alice S Whittemore, Beth Y Karlan, Diether Lambrechts, Nicolas Wentzensen, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Jenny Chang-Claude, Elisa V Bandera, Estrid Hogdall, Florian Heitz, Stanley B Kaye, Peter A Fasching, Ian Campbell, Marc T Goodman, Tanja Pejovic, Yukie T Bean, Laura E Hays, Galina Lurie, Diana Eccles, Alexander Hein, Matthias W Beckmann, Arif B Ekici, James Paul, Robert Brown, James M Flanagan, Philipp Harter, Andreas du Bois, Ira Schwaab, Claus K Hogdall, Lene Lundvall, Sara H Olson, Irene Orlow, Lisa E Paddock, Anja Rudolph, Ursula Eilber, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Iwona K Rzepecka, Izabela Ziolkowska-Seta, Louise A Brinton, Hannah Yang, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Evelyn Despierre, Sandrina Lambrechts, Ignace Vergote, Christine S Walsh, Jenny Lester, Weiva Sieh, Valerie McGuire, Joseph H Rothstein, Argyrios Ziogas, Jan Lubiński, Cezary Cybulski, Janusz Menkiszak, Allan Jensen, Simon A Gayther, Susan J Ramus, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Andrew Berchuck, Anna H Wu, Malcolm C Pike, David Van Den Berg, Kathryn L Terry, Allison F Vitonis, Starr M Ramirez, David N Rider, Keith L Knutson, Thomas A Sellers, Catherine M Phelan, Jennifer A Doherty, Sharon E Johnatty, Anna deFazio, Honglin Song, Jonathan Tyrer, Kimberly R Kalli, Brooke L Fridley, Julie M Cunningham, Ellen L Goode.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2014
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Survival in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is influenced by the host immune response, yet the key genetic determinants of inflammation and immunity that affect prognosis are not known. The nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) transcription factor family plays an important role in many immune and inflammatory responses, including the response to cancer. We studied common inherited variation in 210 genes in the NF-?B family in 10,084 patients with invasive EOC (5,248 high-grade serous, 1,452 endometrioid, 795 clear cell, and 661 mucinous) from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. Associations between genotype and overall survival were assessed using Cox regression for all patients and by major histology, adjusting for known prognostic factors and correcting for multiple testing (threshold for statistical significance, P < 2.5 × 10(-5)). Results were statistically significant when assessed for patients of a single histology. Key associations were with caspase recruitment domain family, member 11 (CARD11) rs41324349 in patients with mucinous EOC [HR, 1.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.41-2.35; P = 4.13 × 10(-6)] and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 13B (TNFRSF13B) rs7501462 in patients with endometrioid EOC (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.56-0.82; P = 2.33 × 10(-5)). Other associations of note included TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) rs17250239 in patients with high-grade serous EOC (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.77-0.92; P = 6.49 × 10(-5)) and phospholipase C, gamma 1 (PLCG1) rs11696662 in patients with clear cell EOC (HR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.26-0.73; P = 4.56 × 10(-4)). These associations highlight the potential importance of genes associated with host inflammation and immunity in modulating clinical outcomes in distinct EOC histologies.
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Ischemia in tumors induces early and sustained phosphorylation changes in stress kinase pathways but does not affect global protein levels.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2014
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Protein abundance and phosphorylation convey important information about pathway activity and molecular pathophysiology in diseases including cancer, providing biological insight, informing drug and diagnostic development, and guiding therapeutic intervention. Analyzed tissues are usually collected without tight regulation or documentation of ischemic time. To evaluate the impact of ischemia, we collected human ovarian tumor and breast cancer xenograft tissue without vascular interruption and performed quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics after defined ischemic intervals. Although the global expressed proteome and most of the >25,000 quantified phosphosites were unchanged after 60 min, rapid phosphorylation changes were observed in up to 24% of the phosphoproteome, representing activation of critical cancer pathways related to stress response, transcriptional regulation, and cell death. Both pan-tumor and tissue-specific changes were observed. The demonstrated impact of pre-analytical tissue ischemia on tumor biology mandates caution in interpreting stress-pathway activation in such samples and motivates reexamination of collection protocols for phosphoprotein analysis.
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New insights into PARP inhibitors' effect on cell cycle and homology-directed DNA damage repair.
Mol. Cancer Ther.
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2014
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In preclinical and clinical studies, olaparib and veliparib are the most represented PARP inhibitors (PARPi), which mainly target homologous DNA damage repair pathway-deficient cancer cells. Their off-target effects are not fully understood, especially with regard to cell cycle and homology-directed DNA damage repair. Our objective was to comparatively evaluate olaparib and veliparib in this context and correlate our findings with their therapeutic potential. We used a well-established direct repeat GFP (DR-GFP) reporter assay in U2OS(DR-GFP) and H1299(DR-GFP) cells and measured DNA damage repair activity upon drug treatment. Olaparib-treated U2OS(DR-GFP) cells showed a dramatic decrease in DNA damage repair versus veliparib irrespective of inhibitory potency. We demonstrate that this effect was a result of olaparib's strong effect on the cell cycle. Unlike in veliparib-treated U2OS(DR-GFP) cells, in olaparib-treated cells S-phase decreased and G(2)-phase increased sharply, indicating a G(2)-phase arrest-like state and replicative stress. This was further confirmed by upregulation of p53 and p21 and accumulation of cyclin A. Lack of the same effect in p53-null H1299(DR-GFP) cells suggested that olaparib's effect is p53 related, which was confirmed in p53-depleted U2OS(DR-GFP) and p53-null HCT116 cells. Importantly, we also demonstrate that olaparib, but not veliparib, induced a robust phosphorylation of Chk1, a crucial component of the replicative stress response pathway. Our data show olaparib and veliparib differ in their off-target effects; olaparib, unlike veliparib, mitigates DNA damage repair activity via G(2) cell-cycle arrest-like effect in a p53-dependent manner. These off-target effects may add to PARPis' anticancer properties.
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Invasion patterns of metastatic high-grade serous carcinoma of ovary or fallopian tube associated with BRCA deficiency.
Mod. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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High-grade serous carcinomas of the uterine adnexa with BRCA1 deficiency (high-grade serous carcinomas-BRCA) have recently been described to demonstrate characteristic histopathological features. We hypothesize that metastatic high-grade serous carcinomas-BRCA cases exhibit characteristic morphological features as well. We studied 102 high-grade serous carcinomas with known BRCA1 and BRCA2 genotype from the archives of the Department of Pathology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. The primary site morphological characteristics of these cases were reported previously; we now focus solely on tumor morphology in sites other than the uterine adnexa (ie, metastatic sites). The study group consisted of the following case types: 13 BRCA1 germline mutations; 5 BRCA1 somatic mutations; 10 BRCA1 promoter methylation; 4 BRCA2 germline mutations; 1 BRCA2 somatic mutation; 11 lacking BRCA1 or BRCA2 abnormality; 58 cases lacking BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation. Two observers independently scored invasion patterns and microscopic tumor architecture while blinded to genotype. Concordance between observers and correlations between metastatic patterns and the following indices were studied: genotype, primary site tumor characteristics, and BRCA1 immunohistochemistry. Concordance between observers was excellent (? values >0.9). All cases with BRCA1 or 2 abnormalities showed either pushing pattern metastases (76%) or infiltrative metastases composed only of micropapillae (24%). In contrast, all cases lacking BRCA1 or 2 abnormalities showed infiltrative metastases that contained combinations of papillary, glandular, and, rarely, cribriform and micropapillary architecture (P<0.0001 for comparison with pushing metastasis and P<0.001 for comparison with purely micropapillary architecture). Morphological assessment of metastatic carcinomas, a highly reproducible exercise, accurately correlated with BRCA1 status in every case, unlike morphological assessment of primary site adnexal high-grade serous carcinomas or BRCA1 immunohistochemistry. Metastatic high-grade serous carcinomas-BRCAs exhibit characteristic morphological features that appear more sensitive and specific for BRCA mutations than two other morphologically based prediction systems and should be easier to apply in practice. These findings should be validated prospectively in an independent cohort.
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Detection of sentinel lymph nodes in minimally invasive surgery using indocyanine green and near-infrared fluorescence imaging for uterine and cervical malignancies.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2014
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Our primary objective was to assess the detection rate of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) using indocyanine green (ICG) and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging for uterine and cervical malignancies.
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Recurrent SMARCA4 mutations in small cell carcinoma of the ovary.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
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Small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT) is a rare, highly aggressive form of ovarian cancer primarily diagnosed in young women. We identified inactivating biallelic SMARCA4 mutations in 100% of the 12 SCCOHT tumors examined. Protein studies confirmed loss of SMARCA4 expression, suggesting a key role for the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex in SCCOHT.
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Consortium analysis of gene and gene-folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk.
Linda E Kelemen, Kathryn L Terry, Marc T Goodman, Penelope M Webb, Elisa V Bandera, Valerie McGuire, Mary Anne Rossing, Qinggang Wang, Ed Dicks, Jonathan P Tyrer, Honglin Song, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Joanna Plisiecka-Halasa, Agnieszka Timorek, Usha Menon, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Simon A Gayther, Susan J Ramus, Steven A Narod, Harvey A Risch, John R McLaughlin, Nadeem Siddiqui, Rosalind Glasspool, James Paul, Karen Carty, Jacek Gronwald, Jan Lubiński, Anna Jakubowska, Cezary Cybulski, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Leon F A G Massuger, Anne M Van Altena, Katja K H Aben, Sara H Olson, Irene Orlow, Daniel W Cramer, Douglas A Levine, Maria Bisogna, Graham G Giles, Melissa C Southey, Fiona Bruinsma, Susanne K Kjaer, Estrid Høgdall, Allan Jensen, Claus K Høgdall, Lene Lundvall, Svend-Aage Engelholm, Florian Heitz, Andreas du Bois, Philipp Harter, Ira Schwaab, Ralf Bützow, Heli Nevanlinna, Liisa M Pelttari, Arto Leminen, Pamela J Thompson, Galina Lurie, Lynne R Wilkens, Diether Lambrechts, Els Van Nieuwenhuysen, Sandrina Lambrechts, Ignace Vergote, Jonathan Beesley, , Peter A Fasching, Matthias W Beckmann, Alexander Hein, Arif B Ekici, Jennifer A Doherty, Anna H Wu, Celeste L Pearce, Malcolm C Pike, Daniel Stram, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Thilo Dörk, Matthias Dürst, Peter Hillemanns, Ingo B Runnebaum, Natalia Bogdanova, Natalia Antonenkova, Kunle Odunsi, Robert P Edwards, Joseph L Kelley, Francesmary Modugno, Roberta B Ness, Beth Y Karlan, Christine Walsh, Jenny Lester, Sandra Orsulic, Brooke L Fridley, Robert A Vierkant, Julie M Cunningham, Xifeng Wu, Karen Lu, Dong Liang, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Edwin S Iversen, Shelley S Tworoger, Elizabeth M Poole, Helga B Salvesen, Camilla Krakstad, Line Bjorge, Ingvild L Tangen, Tanja Pejovic, Yukie Bean, Melissa Kellar, Nicolas Wentzensen, Louise A Brinton, Jolanta Lissowska, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Ian G Campbell, Diana Eccles, Alice S Whittemore, Weiva Sieh, Joseph H Rothstein, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Catherine M Phelan, Kirsten B Moysich, Ellen L Goode, Joellen M Schildkraut, Andrew Berchuck, Paul D P Pharoah, Thomas A Sellers, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Linda S Cook, Nhu D Le.
Mol Nutr Food Res
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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We reevaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (1-C) (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake.
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Large-scale evaluation of common variation in regulatory T cell-related genes and ovarian cancer outcome.
Bridget Charbonneau, Kirsten B Moysich, Kimberly R Kalli, Ann L Oberg, Robert A Vierkant, Zachary C Fogarty, Matthew S Block, Matthew J Maurer, Krista M Goergen, Brooke L Fridley, Julie M Cunningham, David N Rider, Claudia Preston, Lynn C Hartmann, Kate Lawrenson, Chen Wang, Jonathan Tyrer, Honglin Song, Anna deFazio, Sharon E Johnatty, Jennifer A Doherty, Catherine M Phelan, Thomas A Sellers, Starr M Ramirez, Allison F Vitonis, Kathryn L Terry, David Van Den Berg, Malcolm C Pike, Anna H Wu, Andrew Berchuck, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Susan J Ramus, Brenda Diergaarde, Howard Shen, Allan Jensen, Janusz Menkiszak, Cezary Cybulski, Jan Lubiłski, Argyrios Ziogas, Joseph H Rothstein, Valerie McGuire, Weiva Sieh, Jenny Lester, Christine Walsh, Ignace Vergote, Sandrina Lambrechts, Evelyn Despierre, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Hannah Yang, Louise A Brinton, Beata Spiewankiewicz, Iwona K Rzepecka, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Petra Seibold, Anja Rudolph, Lisa E Paddock, Irene Orlow, Lene Lundvall, Sara H Olson, Claus K Hogdall, Ira Schwaab, Andreas du Bois, Philipp Harter, James M Flanagan, Robert Brown, James Paul, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Alexander Hein, Diana Eccles, Galina Lurie, Laura E Hays, Yukie T Bean, Tanja Pejovic, Marc T Goodman, Ian Campbell, Peter A Fasching, Gottfried Konecny, Stanley B Kaye, Florian Heitz, Estrid Hogdall, Elisa V Bandera, Jenny Chang-Claude, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Nicolas Wentzensen, Diether Lambrechts, Beth Y Karlan, Alice S Whittemore, Hoda Anton Culver, Jacek Gronwald, Douglas A Levine, Susanne K Kjaer, Usha Menon, Joellen M Schildkraut, Celeste Leigh Pearce, Daniel W Cramer, Mary Anne Rossing, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, , Paul D P Pharoah, Simon A Gayther, Roberta B Ness, Kunle Odunsi, Lara E Sucheston, Keith L Knutson, Ellen L Goode.
Cancer Immunol Res
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2014
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The presence of regulatory T cells (Treg) in solid tumors is known to play a role in patient survival in ovarian cancer and other malignancies. We assessed inherited genetic variations via 749 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 25 Treg-associated genes (CD28, CTLA4, FOXP3, IDO1, IL10, IL10RA, IL15, 1L17RA, IL23A, IL23R, IL2RA, IL6, IL6R, IL8, LGALS1, LGALS9, MAP3K8, STAT5A, STAT5B, TGFB1, TGFB2, TGFB3, TGFBR1, TGRBR2, and TGFBR3) in relation to ovarian cancer survival. We analyzed genotype and overall survival in 10,084 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, including 5,248 high-grade serous, 1,452 endometrioid, 795 clear cell, and 661 mucinous carcinoma cases of European descent across 28 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). The strongest associations were found for endometrioid carcinoma and IL2RA SNPs rs11256497 [HR, 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.22-1.64; P = 5.7 × 10(-6)], rs791587 (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.17-1.57; P = 6.2 × 10(-5)), rs2476491 (HR, = 1.40; 95% CI, 1.19-1.64; P = 5.6 × 10(-5)), and rs10795763 (HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.17-1.57; P = 7.9 × 10(-5)), and for clear cell carcinoma and CTLA4 SNP rs231775 (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54-0.82; P = 9.3 × 10(-5)) after adjustment for age, study site, population stratification, stage, grade, and oral contraceptive use. The rs231775 allele associated with improved survival in our study also results in an amino acid change in CTLA4 and previously has been reported to be associated with autoimmune conditions. Thus, we found evidence that SNPs in genes related to Tregs seem to play a role in ovarian cancer survival, particularly in patients with clear cell and endometrioid epithelial ovarian cancer.
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Risk of Ovarian Cancer and the NF-?B Pathway: Genetic association with IL1A and TNFSF10.
Bridget Charbonneau, Matthew S Block, William R Bamlet, Robert A Vierkant, Kimberly R Kalli, Zachary Fogarty, David N Rider, Thomas A Sellers, Shelley S Tworoger, Elizabeth Poole, Harvey A Risch, Helga B Salvesen, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Laura Baglietto, Graham G Giles, Gianluca Severi, Britton Trabert, Nicolas Wentzensen, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, , Alice S Whittemore, Weiva Sieh, Jenny Chang-Claude, Elisa V Bandera, Irene Orlow, Kathryn Terry, Marc T Goodman, Pamela J Thompson, Linda S Cook, Mary Anne Rossing, Roberta B Ness, Steven A Narod, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Karen Lu, Ralf Bützow, Thilo Dörk, Tanja Pejovic, Ian Campbell, Nhu D Le, Clareann H Bunker, Natalia Bogdanova, Ingo B Runnebaum, Diana Eccles, James Paul, Anna H Wu, Simon A Gayther, Estrid Hogdall, Florian Heitz, Stanley B Kaye, Beth Y Karlan, Hoda Anton-Culver, Jacek Gronwald, Claus K Hogdall, Diether Lambrechts, Peter A Fasching, Usha Menon, Joellen Schildkraut, Celeste Leigh Pearce, Douglas A Levine, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Daniel Cramer, James M Flanagan, Catherine M Phelan, Robert Brown, Leon F A G Massuger, Honglin Song, Jennifer A Doherty, Camilla Krakstad, Dong Liang, Kunle Odunsi, Andrew Berchuck, Allan Jensen, Jan Lubiński, Heli Nevanlinna, Yukie T Bean, Galina Lurie, Argyrios Ziogas, Christine Walsh, Evelyn Despierre, Louise Brinton, Alexander Hein, Anja Rudolph, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Sara H Olson, Philipp Harter, Jonathan Tyrer, Allison F Vitonis, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Katja K Aben, Malcolm C Pike, Susan J Ramus, Elisabeth Wik, Cezary Cybulski, Jie Lin, Lara Sucheston, Robert Edwards, Valerie McGuire, Jenny Lester, Andreas du Bois, Lene Lundvall, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Lukasz M Szafron, Sandrina Lambrechts, Hannah Yang, Matthias W Beckmann, Liisa M Pelttari, Anne M Van Altena, David Van Den Berg, Mari K Halle, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Ira Schwaab, Urmila Chandran, Janusz Menkiszak, Arif B Ekici, Lynne R Wilkens, Arto Leminen, Francesmary Modugno, Grace Friel, Joseph H Rothstein, Ignace Vergote, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Piotr Sobiczewski, Linda E Kelemen, Paul D P Pharoah, Kirsten Moysich, Keith L Knutson, Julie M Cunningham, Brooke L Fridley, Ellen L Goode.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-22-2013
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A missense single nucleotide polymorphism in the immune modulatory gene IL1A has been associated with ovarian cancer risk (rs17561), but the functional implications of this polymorphism are undefined. IL-1? is regulated by and activated by NF-?B, a transcription factor family that induces transcription of IL1A along with other pro-inflammatory genes and is an important modifier in carcinogenesis. We therefore tagged SNPs in over 200 genes in the NF-?B pathway for a total of 2,282 SNPs (including rs17561) for genotype analysis of 15,604 cases of ovarian cancer in patients of European descent, including 6,179 of high grade serous (HGS), 2,100 endometrioid, 1,591 mucinous, 1,034 clear cell and 1,016 low grade serous (LGS), including 23,235 control cases spanning 40 studies in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). In this large population, we confirmed the association between rs17561 and clear cell ovarian cancer (OR=0.84, 95% CI: 0.76-0.93; p=0.00075), which remained intact even after excluding participants in the prior study (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.75-0.95; p=0.006). Considering a multiple-testing-corrected significance threshold of p< 2.5x10-5, only one other variant, the TNFSF10 SNP rs6785617, was associated significantly with a risk of ovarian cancer (low malignant potential (LMP) tumors OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.79-0.91; p=0.00002). Our results extend the evidence that borderline tumors may have a distinct genetic etiology. Further investigation of how these SNPs might modify ovarian cancer associations with other inflammation related risk factors is warranted.
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Analysis of N-glycoproteins using genomic N-glycosite prediction.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2013
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Protein glycosylation has long been recognized as one of the most common post-translational modifications. Most membrane proteins and extracellular proteins are N-linked glycosylated, and they account for the majority of current clinical diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets. Quantitative proteomic analysis of detectable N-linked glycoproteins from cells or tissues using mass spectrometry has the potential to provide biological basis for disease development and identify disease associated glycoproteins. However, the information of low abundance but important peptides is lost due to the lack of MS/MS fragmentation or low quality of MS/MS spectra for low abundance peptides. Here, we show the feasibility of formerly N-glycopeptide identification and quantification at MS1 level using genomic N-glycosite prediction (GenoGlyco) coupled with stable isotopic labeling and accurate mass matching. The GenoGlyco Analyzer software uses accurate precursor masses of detected N-deglycopeptide peaks to match them to N-linked deglycopeptides that are predicted from genes expressed in the cells. This method results in more robust glycopeptide identification compared to MS/MS-based identification. Our results showed that over three times the quantity of N-deglycopeptide assignments from the same mass spectrometry data could be produced in ovarian cancer cell lines compared to a MS/MS fragmentation method. Furthermore, the method was also applied to N-deglycopeptide analysis of ovarian tumors using the identified deglycopeptides from the two ovarian cell lines as heavy standards. We show that the described method has a great potential in the analysis of detectable N-glycoproteins from cells and tissues.
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Clinical outcome of isolated serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STIC).
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) is recommended for women with BRCA mutation due to increased risk of pelvic serous carcinoma. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) is a pathologic finding of unknown clinical significance. This study evaluates the clinical outcome of patients with isolated STIC.
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Postoperative outcomes among patients undergoing thoracostomy tube placement at time of diaphragm peritonectomy or resection during primary cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 10-08-2013
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Primary cytoreductive surgery in patients with stage IIIC-IV epithelial ovarian cancer frequently includes diaphragm peritonectomy or resection, which can lead to symptomatic pleural effusions when the resection specimen is ?10cm. Our objective was to evaluate whether the placement of an intraoperative thoracostomy tube decreased the incidence of symptomatic pleural effusions in these cases.
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Intraoperative hypothermia during primary surgical cytoreduction for advanced ovarian cancer: Risk factors and associations with postoperative morbidity.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2013
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The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors and potential morbidity associated with intraoperative hypothermia (IH) during cytoreductive surgery (CRS) for advanced ovarian cancer.
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Integrative prediction of gene function and platinum-free survival from genomic and epigenetic features in ovarian cancer.
Methods Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2013
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The identification of genetic and epigenetic alterations from primary tumor cells has become a common method to discover genes critical to the development, progression, and therapeutic resistance of cancer. We seek to identify those genetic and epigenetic aberrations that have the most impact on gene function within the tumor. First, we perform a bioinformatics analysis of copy number variation (CNV) and DNA methylation covering the genetic landscape of ovarian cancer tumor cells. We were specifically interested in copy number variation as our base genomic property in the prediction of tumor suppressors and oncogenes in the altered ovarian tumor. We identify changes in DNA methylation and expression specifically for all amplified and deleted genes. We statistically define tumor suppressor and oncogenic gene function from integrative analysis of three modalities: copy number variation, DNA methylation, and gene expression. Our method (1) calculates the extent of genomic and epigenetic alterations of defined tumor suppressor and oncogenic features for the functional prediction of significant ovarian cancer gene candidates and (2) identifies the functional activity or inactivity of known tumor suppressors and oncogenes in ovarian cancer. We applied our protocol on 42 primary serous ovarian cancer samples using MOMA-ROMA representational array assays. Additionally, we provide the basis for incorporating epigenetic profiles of ovarian tumors for the purposes of platinum-free survival prediction in the context of TCGA data.
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Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA.
Madalene A Earp, Linda E Kelemen, Anthony M Magliocco, Kenneth D Swenerton, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, , Yi Lu, Alexander Hein, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Peter A Fasching, Diether Lambrechts, Evelyn Despierre, Ignace Vergote, Sandrina Lambrechts, Jennifer A Doherty, Mary Anne Rossing, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Grace Friel, Kirsten B Moysich, Kunle Odunsi, Lara Sucheston-Campbell, Galina Lurie, Marc T Goodman, Michael E Carney, Pamela J Thompson, Ingo B Runnebaum, Matthias Dürst, Peter Hillemanns, Thilo Dörk, Natalia Antonenkova, Natalia Bogdanova, Arto Leminen, Heli Nevanlinna, Liisa M Pelttari, Ralf Bützow, Clareann H Bunker, Francesmary Modugno, Robert P Edwards, Roberta B Ness, Andreas du Bois, Florian Heitz, Ira Schwaab, Philipp Harter, Beth Y Karlan, Christine Walsh, Jenny Lester, Allan Jensen, Susanne K Kjær, Claus K Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Lene Lundvall, Thomas A Sellers, Brooke L Fridley, Ellen L Goode, Julie M Cunningham, Robert A Vierkant, Graham G Giles, Laura Baglietto, Gianluca Severi, Melissa C Southey, Dong Liang, Xifeng Wu, Karen Lu, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Douglas A Levine, Maria Bisogna, Joellen M Schildkraut, Edwin S Iversen, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Andrew Berchuck, Daniel W Cramer, Kathryn L Terry, Elizabeth M Poole, Shelley S Tworoger, Elisa V Bandera, Urmila Chandran, Irene Orlow, Sara H Olson, Elisabeth Wik, Helga B Salvesen, Line Bjorge, Mari K Halle, Anne M Van Altena, Katja K H Aben, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Leon F A G Massuger, Tanja Pejovic, Yukie T Bean, Cezary Cybulski, Jacek Gronwald, Jan Lubiński, Nicolas Wentzensen, Louise A Brinton, Jolanta Lissowska, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Ed Dicks, Joe Dennis, Douglas F Easton, Honglin Song, Jonathan P Tyrer, Paul D P Pharoah, Diana Eccles, Ian G Campbell, Alice S Whittemore, Valerie McGuire, Weiva Sieh, Joseph H Rothstein, James M Flanagan, James Paul, Robert Brown, Catherine M Phelan, Harvey A Risch, John R McLaughlin, Steven A Narod, Argyrios Ziogas, Hoda Anton-Culver, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Usha Menon, Simon A Gayther, Susan J Ramus, Anna H Wu, Celeste L Pearce, Malcolm C Pike, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Iwona K Rzepecka, Lukasz M Szafron, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Linda S Cook, Nhu D Le, Angela Brooks-Wilson.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2013
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Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS [56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low-malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC], selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging six loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P < 0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR = 1.17, P = 0.029, n = 1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P = 0.014, n = 2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR = 0.86, P = 0.0043, n = 892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR = 0.84, P = 0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P < 0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes.
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Inferring tumour purity and stromal and immune cell admixture from expression data.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2013
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Infiltrating stromal and immune cells form the major fraction of normal cells in tumour tissue and not only perturb the tumour signal in molecular studies but also have an important role in cancer biology. Here we describe Estimation of STromal and Immune cells in MAlignant Tumours using Expression data (ESTIMATE)--a method that uses gene expression signatures to infer the fraction of stromal and immune cells in tumour samples. ESTIMATE scores correlate with DNA copy number-based tumour purity across samples from 11 different tumour types, profiled on Agilent, Affymetrix platforms or based on RNA sequencing and available through The Cancer Genome Atlas. The prediction accuracy is further corroborated using 3,809 transcriptional profiles available elsewhere in the public domain. The ESTIMATE method allows consideration of tumour-associated normal cells in genomic and transcriptomic studies. An R-library is available on https://sourceforge.net/projects/estimateproject/.
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Nonequivalent gene expression and copy number alterations in high-grade serous ovarian cancers with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2013
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High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) accounts for the majority of epithelial ovarian cancer deaths. Genomic and functional data suggest that approximately half of unselected HGSC have disruption of the BRCA pathway and defects in homologous recombination repair (HRR). Pathway disruption is regarded as imparting a BRCAness phenotype. We explored the molecular changes in HGSC arising in association with specific BRCA1/BRCA2 somatic or germline mutations and in those with BRCA1 DNA promoter methylation.
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Loss of DOK2 induces carboplatin resistance in ovarian cancer via suppression of apoptosis.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2013
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Ovarian cancers are highly heterogeneous and while chemotherapy is the preferred treatment many patients are intrinsically resistant or quickly develop resistance. Furthermore, all tumors that recur ultimately become resistant. Recent evidence suggests that epigenetic deregulation may be a key factor in the onset and maintenance of chemoresistance. We set out to identify epigenetically silenced genes that affect chemoresistance.
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Integrated genomic characterization of endometrial carcinoma.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2013
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We performed an integrated genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic characterization of 373 endometrial carcinomas using array- and sequencing-based technologies. Uterine serous tumours and ?25% of high-grade endometrioid tumours had extensive copy number alterations, few DNA methylation changes, low oestrogen receptor/progesterone receptor levels, and frequent TP53 mutations. Most endometrioid tumours had few copy number alterations or TP53 mutations, but frequent mutations in PTEN, CTNNB1, PIK3CA, ARID1A and KRAS and novel mutations in the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex gene ARID5B. A subset of endometrioid tumours that we identified had a markedly increased transversion mutation frequency and newly identified hotspot mutations in POLE. Our results classified endometrial cancers into four categories: POLE ultramutated, microsatellite instability hypermutated, copy-number low, and copy-number high. Uterine serous carcinomas share genomic features with ovarian serous and basal-like breast carcinomas. We demonstrated that the genomic features of endometrial carcinomas permit a reclassification that may affect post-surgical adjuvant treatment for women with aggressive tumours.
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Analysis of over 10,000 Cases finds no association between previously reported candidate polymorphisms and ovarian cancer outcome.
Kristin L White, Robert A Vierkant, Zachary C Fogarty, Bridget Charbonneau, Matthew S Block, Paul D P Pharoah, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, , Mary Anne Rossing, Daniel W Cramer, Celeste Leigh Pearce, Joellen M Schildkraut, Usha Menon, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Douglas A Levine, Jacek Gronwald, Hoda Anton Culver, Alice S Whittemore, Beth Y Karlan, Diether Lambrechts, Nicolas Wentzensen, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Jenny Chang-Claude, Elisa V Bandera, Estrid Hogdall, Florian Heitz, Stanley B Kaye, Peter A Fasching, Ian Campbell, Marc T Goodman, Tanja Pejovic, Yukie Bean, Galina Lurie, Diana Eccles, Alexander Hein, Matthias W Beckmann, Arif B Ekici, James Paul, Robert Brown, James M Flanagan, Philipp Harter, Andreas du Bois, Ira Schwaab, Claus K Hogdall, Lene Lundvall, Sara H Olson, Irene Orlow, Lisa E Paddock, Anja Rudolph, Ursula Eilber, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Iwona K Rzepecka, Izabela Ziolkowska-Seta, Louise Brinton, Hannah Yang, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Evelyn Despierre, Sandrina Lambrechts, Ignace Vergote, Christine Walsh, Jenny Lester, Weiva Sieh, Valerie McGuire, Joseph H Rothstein, Argyrios Ziogas, Jan Lubiński, Cezary Cybulski, Janusz Menkiszak, Allan Jensen, Simon A Gayther, Susan J Ramus, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Andrew Berchuck, Anna H Wu, Malcolm C Pike, David Van Denberg, Kathryn L Terry, Allison F Vitonis, Jennifer A Doherty, Sharon E Johnatty, Anna deFazio, Honglin Song, Jonathan Tyrer, Thomas A Sellers, Catherine M Phelan, Kimberly R Kalli, Julie M Cunningham, Brooke L Fridley, Ellen L Goode.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death among women. In an effort to understand contributors to disease outcome, we evaluated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) previously associated with ovarian cancer recurrence or survival, specifically in angiogenesis, inflammation, mitosis, and drug disposition genes.
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Epigenetic analysis leads to identification of HNF1B as a subtype-specific susceptibility gene for ovarian cancer.
Hui Shen, Brooke L Fridley, Honglin Song, Kate Lawrenson, Julie M Cunningham, Susan J Ramus, Mine S Cicek, Jonathan Tyrer, Douglas Stram, Melissa C Larson, Martin Köbel, , Argyrios Ziogas, Wei Zheng, Hannah P Yang, Anna H Wu, Eva L Wozniak, Yin Ling Woo, Boris Winterhoff, Elisabeth Wik, Alice S Whittemore, Nicolas Wentzensen, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Allison F Vitonis, Daniel Vincent, Robert A Vierkant, Ignace Vergote, David Van Den Berg, Anne M Van Altena, Shelley S Tworoger, Pamela J Thompson, Daniel C Tessier, Kathryn L Terry, Soo-Hwang Teo, Claire Templeman, Daniel O Stram, Melissa C Southey, Weiva Sieh, Nadeem Siddiqui, Yurii B Shvetsov, Xiao-Ou Shu, Viji Shridhar, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Gianluca Severi, Ira Schwaab, Helga B Salvesen, Iwona K Rzepecka, Ingo B Runnebaum, Mary Anne Rossing, Lorna Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Harvey A Risch, Stefan P Renner, Elizabeth M Poole, Malcolm C Pike, Catherine M Phelan, Liisa M Pelttari, Tanja Pejovic, James Paul, Irene Orlow, Siti Zawiah Omar, Sara H Olson, Kunle Odunsi, Stefan Nickels, Heli Nevanlinna, Roberta B Ness, Steven A Narod, Toru Nakanishi, Kirsten B Moysich, Alvaro N A Monteiro, Joanna Moes-Sosnowska, Francesmary Modugno, Usha Menon, John R McLaughlin, Valerie McGuire, Keitaro Matsuo, Noor Azmi Mat Adenan, Leon F A G Massuger, Galina Lurie, Lene Lundvall, Jan Lubiński, Jolanta Lissowska, Douglas A Levine, Arto Leminen, Alice W Lee, Nhu D Le, Sandrina Lambrechts, Diether Lambrechts, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Camilla Krakstad, Gottfried E Konecny, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Linda E Kelemen, Gary L Keeney, Beth Y Karlan, Rod Karevan, Kimberly R Kalli, Hiroaki Kajiyama, Bu-Tian Ji, Allan Jensen, Anna Jakubowska, Edwin Iversen, Satoyo Hosono, Claus K Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Maureen Hoatlin, Peter Hillemanns, Florian Heitz, Rebecca Hein, Philipp Harter, Mari K Halle, Per Hall, Jacek Gronwald, Martin Gore, Marc T Goodman, Graham G Giles, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, James M Flanagan, Peter A Fasching, Arif B Ekici, Robert Edwards, Diana Eccles, Douglas F Easton, Matthias Dürst, Andreas du Bois, Thilo Dörk, Jennifer A Doherty, Evelyn Despierre, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Cezary Cybulski, Daniel W Cramer, Linda S Cook, Xiaoqing Chen, Bridget Charbonneau, Jenny Chang-Claude, Ian Campbell, Ralf Bützow, Clareann H Bunker, Doerthe Brueggmann, Robert Brown, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Louise A Brinton, Natalia Bogdanova, Matthew S Block, Elizabeth Benjamin, Jonathan Beesley, Matthias W Beckmann, Elisa V Bandera, Laura Baglietto, Francois Bacot, Sebastian M Armasu, Natalia Antonenkova, Hoda Anton-Culver, Katja K Aben, Dong Liang, Xifeng Wu, Karen Lu, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Joellen M Schildkraut, Thomas A Sellers, David Huntsman, Andrew Berchuck, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Simon A Gayther, Paul D P Pharoah, Peter W Laird, Ellen L Goode, Celeste Leigh Pearce.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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HNF1B is overexpressed in clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer, and we observed epigenetic silencing in serous epithelial ovarian cancer, leading us to hypothesize that variation in this gene differentially associates with epithelial ovarian cancer risk according to histological subtype. Here we comprehensively map variation in HNF1B with respect to epithelial ovarian cancer risk and analyse DNA methylation and expression profiles across histological subtypes. Different single-nucleotide polymorphisms associate with invasive serous (rs7405776 odds ratio (OR)=1.13, P=3.1 × 10(-10)) and clear cell (rs11651755 OR=0.77, P=1.6 × 10(-8)) epithelial ovarian cancer. Risk alleles for the serous subtype associate with higher HNF1B-promoter methylation in these tumours. Unmethylated, expressed HNF1B, primarily present in clear cell tumours, coincides with a CpG island methylator phenotype affecting numerous other promoters throughout the genome. Different variants in HNF1B associate with risk of serous and clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer; DNA methylation and expression patterns are also notably distinct between these subtypes. These findings underscore distinct mechanisms driving different epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes.
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Identification and molecular characterization of a new ovarian cancer susceptibility locus at 17q21.31.
Jennifer Permuth-Wey, Kate Lawrenson, Howard C Shen, Aneliya Velkova, Jonathan P Tyrer, Zhihua Chen, Hui-Yi Lin, Y Ann Chen, Ya-Yu Tsai, Xiaotao Qu, Susan J Ramus, Rod Karevan, Janet Lee, Nathan Lee, Melissa C Larson, Katja K Aben, Hoda Anton-Culver, Natalia Antonenkova, Antonis C Antoniou, Sebastian M Armasu, , Francois Bacot, Laura Baglietto, Elisa V Bandera, Jill Barnholtz-Sloan, Matthias W Beckmann, Michael J Birrer, Greg Bloom, Natalia Bogdanova, Louise A Brinton, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Robert Brown, Ralf Bützow, Qiuyin Cai, Ian Campbell, Jenny Chang-Claude, Stephen Chanock, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Jin Q Cheng, Mine S Cicek, Gerhard A Coetzee, Linda S Cook, Fergus J Couch, Daniel W Cramer, Julie M Cunningham, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Evelyn Despierre, Jennifer A Doherty, Thilo Dörk, Andreas du Bois, Matthias Dürst, Douglas F Easton, Diana Eccles, Robert Edwards, Arif B Ekici, Peter A Fasching, David A Fenstermacher, James M Flanagan, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Graham G Giles, Rosalind M Glasspool, Jesus Gonzalez-Bosquet, Marc T Goodman, Martin Gore, Bohdan Górski, Jacek Gronwald, Per Hall, Mari K Halle, Philipp Harter, Florian Heitz, Peter Hillemanns, Maureen Hoatlin, Claus K Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Satoyo Hosono, Anna Jakubowska, Allan Jensen, Heather Jim, Kimberly R Kalli, Beth Y Karlan, Stanley B Kaye, Linda E Kelemen, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Fumitaka Kikkawa, Gottfried E Konecny, Camilla Krakstad, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Diether Lambrechts, Sandrina Lambrechts, Johnathan M Lancaster, Nhu D Le, Arto Leminen, Douglas A Levine, Dong Liang, Boon Kiong Lim, Jie Lin, Jolanta Lissowska, Karen H Lu, Jan Lubiński, Galina Lurie, Leon F A G Massuger, Keitaro Matsuo, Valerie McGuire, John R McLaughlin, Usha Menon, Francesmary Modugno, Kirsten B Moysich, Toru Nakanishi, Steven A Narod, Lotte Nedergaard, Roberta B Ness, Heli Nevanlinna, Stefan Nickels, Houtan Noushmehr, Kunle Odunsi, Sara H Olson, Irene Orlow, James Paul, Celeste L Pearce, Tanja Pejovic, Liisa M Pelttari, Malcolm C Pike, Elizabeth M Poole, Paola Raska, Stefan P Renner, Harvey A Risch, Lorna Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Mary Anne Rossing, Anja Rudolph, Ingo B Runnebaum, Iwona K Rzepecka, Helga B Salvesen, Ira Schwaab, Gianluca Severi, Viji Shridhar, Xiao-Ou Shu, Yurii B Shvetsov, Weiva Sieh, Honglin Song, Melissa C Southey, Beata Spiewankiewicz, Daniel Stram, Rebecca Sutphen, Soo-Hwang Teo, Kathryn L Terry, Daniel C Tessier, Pamela J Thompson, Shelley S Tworoger, Anne M Van Altena, Ignace Vergote, Robert A Vierkant, Daniel Vincent, Allison F Vitonis, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Nicolas Wentzensen, Alice S Whittemore, Elisabeth Wik, Lynne R Wilkens, Boris Winterhoff, Yin Ling Woo, Anna H Wu, Yong-Bing Xiang, Hannah P Yang, Wei Zheng, Argyrios Ziogas, Famida Zulkifli, Catherine M Phelan, Edwin Iversen, Joellen M Schildkraut, Andrew Berchuck, Brooke L Fridley, Ellen L Goode, Paul D P Pharoah, Alvaro N A Monteiro, Thomas A Sellers, Simon A Gayther.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has a heritable component that remains to be fully characterized. Most identified common susceptibility variants lie in non-protein-coding sequences. We hypothesized that variants in the 3 untranslated region at putative microRNA (miRNA)-binding sites represent functional targets that influence EOC susceptibility. Here, we evaluate the association between 767 miRNA-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (miRSNPs) and EOC risk in 18,174 EOC cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies genotyped through the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study. We identify several miRSNPs associated with invasive serous EOC risk (odds ratio=1.12, P=10(-8)) mapping to an inversion polymorphism at 17q21.31. Additional genotyping of non-miRSNPs at 17q21.31 reveals stronger signals outside the inversion (P=10(-10)). Variation at 17q21.31 is associated with neurological diseases, and our collaboration is the first to report an association with EOC susceptibility. An integrated molecular analysis in this region provides evidence for ARHGAP27 and PLEKHM1 as candidate EOC susceptibility genes.
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BRCA1 immunohistochemistry in a molecularly characterized cohort of ovarian high-grade serous carcinomas.
Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2013
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BRCA1 and BRCA2 dysfunction, frequently seen in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas, often results from germline mutations, somatic mutations, and promoter methylation. Identification of tumors with BRCA defects has therapeutic and prognostic implications. Identifying germline BRCA mutations is also important given the increased risk for hereditary breast and ovarian carcinoma. Our goal was to assess whether immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) for BRCA1 is an effective method for the detection of BRCA1 dysfunction in molecularly characterized high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma. We identified 43 high-grade ovarian serous carcinomas with known events in BRCA1 and BRCA2 included in The Cancer Genome Atlas Project. BRCA1 stain was first assessed without knowledge of the BRCA status, and a semiquantitative assessment for intensity and amount of staining was performed. The stains were reevaluated and divided into 3 categories (retained, loss, and equivocal) on the basis of correlation with genotyping data. Presence of retained BRCA staining was considered normal, whereas the other patterns, including equivocal staining or loss of staining, were considered abnormal. Two pathologists, blinded to the BRCA status, then scored 2 sets of validation cases selected on the basis of available molecular data-1 with only germline mutation status available (n=31) and 1 with comprehensive genomic data (n=39). The pathologists agreed 88% of the time in the training set and 91% in the validation sets. In the training set, abnormal BRCA staining was seen in 24 cases, of which 21 (87%) showed BRCA1 genetic abnormalities, 1 showed BRCA2 mutations, and 2 showed no BRCA abnormalities. Abnormal BRCA1 staining was noted in all 5 cases with BRCA1 germline mutations, in 3 (60%) of 5 with BRCA1 somatic mutations, and in 13 (93%) of 14 with BRCA1 promoter methylation. The 2 validation sets included 70 additional patients, and all cases with germline BRCA1 mutations (n=11) showed abnormal BRCA1 staining. Tumors with BRCA1 promoter methylation also showed abnormal staining in 6 (86%) of 7 cases. In the entire study, no cases with BRCA1 germline mutation showed intact immunostaining (negative predictive value=100%). This study shows that BRCA1 IHC is well correlated with molecular events in ovarian carcinoma. Considering the high negative predictive value for germline mutations, BRCA1 IHC appears to be an effective approach to stratify patients for germline genetic testing and to detect other mechanisms of BRCA1 dysfunction in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas.
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Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer.
Stig E Bojesen, Karen A Pooley, Sharon E Johnatty, Jonathan Beesley, Kyriaki Michailidou, Jonathan P Tyrer, Stacey L Edwards, Hilda A Pickett, Howard C Shen, Chanel E Smart, Kristine M Hillman, Phuong L Mai, Kate Lawrenson, Michael D Stutz, Yi Lu, Rod Karevan, Nicholas Woods, Rebecca L Johnston, Juliet D French, Xiaoqing Chen, Maren Weischer, Sune F Nielsen, Melanie J Maranian, Maya Ghoussaini, Shahana Ahmed, Caroline Baynes, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Joe Dennis, Lesley McGuffog, Daniel Barrowdale, Andrew Lee, Sue Healey, Michael Lush, Daniel C Tessier, Daniel Vincent, Françis Bacot, , Ignace Vergote, Sandrina Lambrechts, Evelyn Despierre, Harvey A Risch, Anna González-Neira, Mary Anne Rossing, Guillermo Pita, Jennifer A Doherty, Nuria Alvarez, Melissa C Larson, Brooke L Fridley, Nils Schoof, Jenny Chang-Claude, Mine S Cicek, Julian Peto, Kimberly R Kalli, Annegien Broeks, Sebastian M Armasu, Marjanka K Schmidt, Linde M Braaf, Boris Winterhoff, Heli Nevanlinna, Gottfried E Konecny, Diether Lambrechts, Lisa Rogmann, Pascal Guénel, Attila Teoman, Roger L Milne, Joaquín J García, Angela Cox, Vijayalakshmi Shridhar, Barbara Burwinkel, Frederik Marme, Rebecca Hein, Elinor J Sawyer, Christopher A Haiman, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Irene L Andrulis, Kirsten B Moysich, John L Hopper, Kunle Odunsi, Annika Lindblom, Graham G Giles, Hermann Brenner, Jacques Simard, Galina Lurie, Peter A Fasching, Michael E Carney, Paolo Radice, Lynne R Wilkens, Anthony Swerdlow, Marc T Goodman, Hiltrud Brauch, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Peter Hillemanns, Robert Winqvist, Matthias Dürst, Peter Devilee, Ingo Runnebaum, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Arto Mannermaa, Ralf Bützow, Natalia V Bogdanova, Thilo Dörk, Liisa M Pelttari, Wei Zheng, Arto Leminen, Hoda Anton-Culver, Clareann H Bunker, Vessela Kristensen, Roberta B Ness, Kenneth Muir, Robert Edwards, Alfons Meindl, Florian Heitz, Keitaro Matsuo, Andreas du Bois, Anna H Wu, Philipp Harter, Soo-Hwang Teo, Ira Schwaab, Xiao-Ou Shu, William Blot, Satoyo Hosono, Daehee Kang, Toru Nakanishi, Mikael Hartman, Yasushi Yatabe, Ute Hamann, Beth Y Karlan, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Valerie Gaborieau, Allan Jensen, Diana Eccles, Estrid Høgdall, Chen-Yang Shen, Judith Brown, Yin Ling Woo, Mitul Shah, Mat Adenan Noor Azmi, Robert Luben, Siti Zawiah Omar, Kamila Czene, Robert A Vierkant, Børge G Nordestgaard, Henrik Flyger, Celine Vachon, Janet E Olson, Xianshu Wang, Douglas A Levine, Anja Rudolph, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Edwin Iversen, Stefan Nickels, Joellen M Schildkraut, Isabel dos Santos Silva, Daniel W Cramer, Lorna Gibson, Kathryn L Terry, Olivia Fletcher, Allison F Vitonis, C Ellen van der Schoot, Elizabeth M Poole, Frans B L Hogervorst, Shelley S Tworoger, Jianjun Liu, Elisa V Bandera, Jingmei Li, Sara H Olson, Keith Humphreys, Irene Orlow, Carl Blomqvist, Lorna Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Kristiina Aittomäki, Helga B Salvesen, Taru A Muranen, Elisabeth Wik, Barbara Brouwers, Camilla Krakstad, Els Wauters, Mari K Halle, Hans Wildiers, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Claire Mulot, Katja K Aben, Pierre Laurent-Puig, Anne Mvan Altena, Thérèse Truong, Leon F A G Massuger, Javier Benitez, Tanja Pejovic, Jose Ignacio Arias Perez, Maureen Hoatlin, M Pilar Zamora, Linda S Cook, Sabapathy P Balasubramanian, Linda E Kelemen, Andreas Schneeweiss, Nhu D Le, Christof Sohn, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Cezary Cybulski, Brian E Henderson, Janusz Menkiszak, Fredrick Schumacher, Nicolas Wentzensen, Loic Le Marchand, Hannah P Yang, Anna Marie Mulligan, Gord Glendon, Svend Aage Engelholm, Julia A Knight, Claus K Høgdall, Carmel Apicella, Martin Gore, Helen Tsimiklis, Honglin Song, Melissa C Southey, Agnes Jager, Ans M Wvan den Ouweland, Robert Brown, John W M Martens, James M Flanagan, Mieke Kriege, James Paul, Sara Margolin, Nadeem Siddiqui, Gianluca Severi, Alice S Whittemore, Laura Baglietto, Valerie McGuire, Christa Stegmaier, Weiva Sieh, Heiko Muller, Volker Arndt, France Labrèche, Yu-Tang Gao, Mark S Goldberg, Gong Yang, Martine Dumont, John R McLaughlin, Arndt Hartmann, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Catherine M Phelan, Michael P Lux, Jenny Permuth-Wey, Bernard Peissel, Thomas A Sellers, Filomena Ficarazzi, Monica Barile, Argyrios Ziogas, Alan Ashworth, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Michael Jones, Susan J Ramus, Nick Orr, Usha Menon, Celeste L Pearce, Thomas Brüning, Malcolm C Pike, Yon-Dschun Ko, Jolanta Lissowska, Jonine Figueroa, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Stephen J Chanock, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Iwona K Rzepecka, Katri Pylkäs, Mariusz Bidzinski, Saila Kauppila, Antoinette Hollestelle, Caroline Seynaeve, Rob A E M Tollenaar, Katarzyna Durda, Katarzyna Jaworska, Jaana M Hartikainen, Veli-Matti Kosma, Vesa Kataja, Natalia N Antonenkova, Jirong Long, Martha Shrubsole, Sandra Deming-Halverson, Artitaya Lophatananon, Pornthep Siriwanarangsan, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Nina Ditsch, Peter Lichtner, Rita K Schmutzler, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Kazuo Tajima, Chiu-Chen Tseng, Daniel O Stram, David Van Den Berg, Cheng Har Yip, M Kamran Ikram, Yew-Ching Teh, Hui Cai, Wei Lu, Lisa B Signorello, Qiuyin Cai, Dong-Young Noh, Keun-Young Yoo, Hui Miao, Philip Tsau-Choong Iau, Yik Ying Teo, James McKay, Charles Shapiro, Foluso Ademuyiwa, George Fountzilas, Chia-Ni Hsiung, Jyh-Cherng Yu, Ming-Feng Hou, Catherine S Healey, Craig Luccarini, Susan Peock, Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet, Paolo Peterlongo, Timothy R Rebbeck, Marion Piedmonte, Christian F Singer, Eitan Friedman, Mads Thomassen, Kenneth Offit, Thomas V O Hansen, Susan L Neuhausen, Csilla I Szabo, Ignacio Blanco, Judy Garber, Steven A Narod, Jeffrey N Weitzel, Marco Montagna, Edith Olah, Andrew K Godwin, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, David E Goldgar, Trinidad Caldés, Evgeny N Imyanitov, Laima Tihomirova, Banu K Arun, Ian Campbell, Arjen R Mensenkamp, Christi J van Asperen, Kees E P van Roozendaal, Hanne Meijers-Heijboer, J Margriet Collée, Jan C Oosterwijk, Maartje J Hooning, Matti A Rookus, Rob B van der Luijt, Theo A Mvan Os, D Gareth Evans, Debra Frost, Elena Fineberg, Julian Barwell, Lisa Walker, M John Kennedy, Radka Platte, Rosemarie Davidson, Steve D Ellis, Trevor Cole, Brigitte Bressac-de Paillerets, Bruno Buecher, Francesca Damiola, Laurence Faivre, Marc Frénay, Olga M Sinilnikova, Olivier Caron, Sophie Giraud, Sylvie Mazoyer, Valérie Bonadona, Virginie Caux-Moncoutier, Aleksandra Toloczko-Grabarek, Jacek Gronwald, Tomasz Byrski, Amanda B Spurdle, Bernardo Bonanni, Daniela Zaffaroni, Giuseppe Giannini, Loris Bernard, Riccardo Dolcetti, Siranoush Manoukian, Norbert Arnold, Christoph Engel, Helmut Deissler, Kerstin Rhiem, Dieter Niederacher, Hansjoerg Plendl, Christian Sutter, Barbara Wappenschmidt, Ake Borg, Beatrice Melin, Johanna Rantala, Maria Soller, Katherine L Nathanson, Susan M Domchek, Gustavo C Rodriguez, Ritu Salani, Daphne Gschwantler Kaulich, Muy-Kheng Tea, Shani Shimon Paluch, Yael Laitman, Anne-Bine Skytte, Torben A Kruse, Uffe Birk Jensen, Mark Robson, Anne-Marie Gerdes, Bent Ejlertsen, Lenka Foretova, Sharon A Savage, Jenny Lester, Penny Soucy, Karoline B Kuchenbaecker, Curtis Olswold, Julie M Cunningham, Susan Slager, Vernon S Pankratz, Ed Dicks, Sunil R Lakhani, Fergus J Couch, Per Hall, Alvaro N A Monteiro, Simon A Gayther, Paul D P Pharoah, Roger R Reddel, Ellen L Goode, Mark H Greene, Douglas F Easton, Andrew Berchuck, Antonis C Antoniou, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Alison M Dunning.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2013
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TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOGs, we analyzed ?480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases and controls. Leukocyte telomere measurements were also available for 53,724 participants. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. The minor allele at the peak 1 SNP rs2736108 associates with longer telomeres (P = 5.8 × 10(-7)), lower risks for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative (P = 1.0 × 10(-8)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.1 × 10(-5)) breast cancers and altered promoter assay signal. The minor allele at the peak 2 SNP rs7705526 associates with longer telomeres (P = 2.3 × 10(-14)), higher risk of low-malignant-potential ovarian cancer (P = 1.3 × 10(-15)) and greater promoter activity. The minor alleles at the peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 increase ER-negative (P = 1.2 × 10(-12)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.6 × 10(-14)) breast and invasive ovarian (P = 1.3 × 10(-11)) cancer risks but not via altered telomere length. The cancer risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690, respectively, increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice variant.
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Transcript expression in endometrial cancers from Black and White patients.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2013
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Previous studies suggest that differences in molecular features of endometrial cancers between racial groups may contribute to the poorer survival in Blacks. The objective of this investigation was to determine whether gene expression among endometrial cancers is different between Blacks and Whites.
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Evaluating cell lines as tumour models by comparison of genomic profiles.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2013
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Cancer cell lines are frequently used as in vitro tumour models. Recent molecular profiles of hundreds of cell lines from The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia and thousands of tumour samples from the Cancer Genome Atlas now allow a systematic genomic comparison of cell lines and tumours. Here we analyse a panel of 47 ovarian cancer cell lines and identify those that have the highest genetic similarity to ovarian tumours. Our comparison of copy-number changes, mutations and mRNA expression profiles reveals pronounced differences in molecular profiles between commonly used ovarian cancer cell lines and high-grade serous ovarian cancer tumour samples. We identify several rarely used cell lines that more closely resemble cognate tumour profiles than commonly used cell lines, and we propose these lines as the most suitable models of ovarian cancer. Our results indicate that the gap between cell lines and tumours can be bridged by genomically informed choices of cell line models for all tumour types.
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Evaluation of DNA from the Papanicolaou test to detect ovarian and endometrial cancers.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
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Papanicolaou (Pap) smears have revolutionized the management of patients with cervical cancers by permitting the detection of early, surgically curable tumors and their precursors. In recent years, the traditional Pap smear has been replaced by a liquid-based method, which allows not only cytologic evaluation but also collection of DNA for detection of human papillomavirus, the causative agent of cervical cancer. We reasoned that this routinely collected DNA could be exploited to detect somatic mutations present in rare tumor cells that accumulate in the cervix once shed from endometrial or ovarian cancers. A panel of genes that are commonly mutated in endometrial and ovarian cancers was assembled with new whole-exome sequencing data from 22 endometrial cancers and previously published data on other tumor types. We used this panel to search for mutations in 24 endometrial and 22 ovarian cancers and identified mutations in all 46 samples. With a sensitive massively parallel sequencing method, we were able to identify the same mutations in the DNA from liquid Pap smear specimens in 100% of endometrial cancers (24 of 24) and in 41% of ovarian cancers (9 of 22). Prompted by these findings, we developed a sequence-based method to query mutations in 12 genes in a single liquid Pap smear specimen without previous knowledge of the tumors genotype. When applied to 14 samples selected from the positive cases described above, the expected tumor-specific mutations were identified. These results demonstrate that DNA from most endometrial and a fraction of ovarian cancers can be detected in a standard liquid-based Pap smear specimen obtained during routine pelvic examination. Although improvements need to be made before applying this test in a routine clinical manner, it represents a promising step toward a broadly applicable screening methodology for the early detection of gynecologic malignancies.
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Two Distinct Categories of Focal Deletions in Cancer Genomes.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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One of the key questions about genomic alterations in cancer is whether they are functional in the sense of contributing to the selective advantage of tumor cells. The frequency with which an alteration occurs might reflect its ability to increase cancer cell growth, or alternatively, enhanced instability of a locus may increase the frequency with which it is found to be aberrant in tumors, regardless of oncogenic impact. Here weve addressed this on a genome-wide scale for cancer-associated focal deletions, which are known to pinpoint both tumor suppressor genes (tumor suppressors) and unstable loci. Based on DNA copy number analysis of over one-thousand human cancers representing ten different tumor types, we observed five loci with focal deletion frequencies above 5%, including the A2BP1 gene at 16p13.3 and the MACROD2 gene at 20p12.1. However, neither RNA expression nor functional studies support a tumor suppressor role for either gene. Further analyses suggest instead that these are sites of increased genomic instability and that they resemble common fragile sites (CFS). Genome-wide analysis revealed properties of CFS-like recurrent deletions that distinguish them from deletions affecting tumor suppressor genes, including their isolation at specific loci away from other genomic deletion sites, a considerably smaller deletion size, and dispersal throughout the affected locus rather than assembly at a common site of overlap. Additionally, CFS-like deletions have less impact on gene expression and are enriched in cell lines compared to primary tumors. We show that loci affected by CFS-like deletions are often distinct from known common fragile sites. Indeed, we find that each tumor tissue type has its own spectrum of CFS-like deletions, and that colon cancers have many more CFS-like deletions than other tumor types. We present simple rules that can pinpoint focal deletions that are not CFS-like and more likely to affect functional tumor suppressors.
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Morphologic patterns associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 genotype in ovarian carcinoma.
Mod. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 12-23-2011
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This study was undertaken with the hypothesis that certain common morphologic features of ovarian carcinomas are predictably associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 deficiencies. We selected 43 high-grade serous carcinomas diagnosed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center that were studied as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas pilot project. In addition to 12 randomly selected nonfamilial BRCA-unassociated cases, all 31 Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center cases with BRCA1 or BRCA2 abnormality were included (n=43). Slides were examined to assess tumor architecture, mitotic index, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), nuclear pleomorphism, necrosis, and involvement of fallopian tube epithelium. Comparing BRCA1-associated cases (BRCA1 germline mutation, n=4, BRCA1 somatic mutation, n=6, BRCA1 promoter methylation, n=13) with unassociated cases (n=12) identified statistically significant differences in morphology. BRCA1-associated high-grade serous carcinomas had more frequent Solid, pseudoEndometrioid, and Transitional cell carcinoma-like morphology (SET features) (P=0.0045), higher mitotic indexes (P=0.012), more TILs (P=0.034), and either geographic or comedo necrosis (P=0.034). BRCA2-associated cases (germline mutation, n=4 and somatic mutation, n=4) tended to show SET features, but they were relatively deficient in TILs and necrosis. Two algorithms incorporating tumor architecture, necrosis, and either mitotic indexes or TILs separated cases that showed 2 of 3 features (BRCA1 associated) from those with 0 of 3 features (BRCA unassociated; P=0.0016 and P=0.0033). A test set comprising 9 BRCA1 germline mutants and 14 high-grade serous carcinoma controls lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutation was used to validate the algorithms, with specific emphasis on the ability to detect cases with BRCA1 germline mutation. Best results were obtained with the algorithm that incorporated SET features, necrosis, and mitotic index (P=0.0072; sensitivity of 1.0 (95% CI, 0.66-1.0); specificity of 0.57 (95% CI, 0.29-0.82); positive predictive value of 0.60 (95% CI, 0.32-0.84) and a negative predictive value of 1.0 (95% CI, 0.63-1.0)). These preliminary data indicate potential strong associations between morphology and genotype in high-grade serous carcinomas.
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Rethinking ovarian cancer: recommendations for improving outcomes.
Nat. Rev. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2011
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There have been major advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of the human malignancies that are collectively referred to as ovarian cancer. At a recent Helene Harris Memorial Trust meeting, an international group of researchers considered actions that should be taken to improve the outcome for women with ovarian cancer. Nine major recommendations are outlined in this Opinion article.
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Nomogram for predicting 5-year disease-specific mortality after primary surgery for epithelial ovarian cancer.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 08-31-2011
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To develop a nomogram based on established prognostic factors to predict the probability of 5-year disease-specific mortality after primary surgery for patients with all stages of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and compare the predictive accuracy with the currently used International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system.
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Protection from UV-induced skin carcinogenesis by genetic inhibition of the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2011
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Multiple human epidemiologic studies link caffeinated (but not decaffeinated) beverage intake with significant decreases in several types of cancer, including highly prevalent UV-associated skin carcinomas. The mechanism by which caffeine protects against skin cancer is unknown. Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) is a replication checkpoint kinase activated by DNA stresses and is one of several targets of caffeine. Suppression of ATR, or its downstream target checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1), selectively sensitizes DNA-damaged and malignant cells to apoptosis. Agents that target this pathway are currently in clinical trials. Conversely, inhibition of other DNA damage response pathways, such as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and BRCA1, promotes cancer. To determine the effect of replication checkpoint inhibition on carcinogenesis, we generated transgenic mice with diminished ATR function in skin and crossed them into a UV-sensitive background, Xpc(-/-). Unlike caffeine, this genetic approach was selective and had no effect on ATM activation. These transgenic mice were viable and showed no histological abnormalities in skin. Primary keratinocytes from these mice had diminished UV-induced Chk1 phosphorylation and twofold augmentation of apoptosis after UV exposure (P = 0.006). With chronic UV treatment, transgenic mice remained tumor-free for significantly longer (P = 0.003) and had 69% fewer tumors at the end of observation of the full cohort (P = 0.019), compared with littermate controls with the same genetic background. This study suggests that inhibition of replication checkpoint function can suppress skin carcinogenesis and supports ATR inhibition as the relevant mechanism for the protective effect of caffeinated beverage intake in human epidemiologic studies.
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Improved survival for BRCA2-associated serous ovarian cancer compared with both BRCA-negative and BRCA1-associated serous ovarian cancer.
Cancer
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2011
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Multiple observational studies have suggested that breast cancer gene (BRCA)-associated ovarian cancers have improved survival compared with BRCA-negative ovarian cancers. However, most of those studies combined BRCA1 and BRCA2 patients or evaluated only BRCA1 patients. The objective of the current study was to examine whether BRCA1-associated and BRCA2-associated ovarian cancers were associated with different outcomes.
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Identification of tumor suppressors and oncogenes from genomic and epigenetic features in ovarian cancer.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2011
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The identification of genetic and epigenetic alterations from primary tumor cells has become a common method to identify genes critical to the development and progression of cancer. We seek to identify those genetic and epigenetic aberrations that have the most impact on gene function within the tumor. First, we perform a bioinformatic analysis of copy number variation (CNV) and DNA methylation covering the genetic landscape of ovarian cancer tumor cells. We separately examined CNV and DNA methylation for 42 primary serous ovarian cancer samples using MOMA-ROMA assays and 379 tumor samples analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas. We have identified 346 genes with significant deletions or amplifications among the tumor samples. Utilizing associated gene expression data we predict 156 genes with altered copy number and correlated changes in expression. Among these genes CCNE1, POP4, UQCRB, PHF20L1 and C19orf2 were identified within both data sets. We were specifically interested in copy number variation as our base genomic property in the prediction of tumor suppressors and oncogenes in the altered ovarian tumor. We therefore identify changes in DNA methylation and expression for all amplified and deleted genes. We statistically define tumor suppressor and oncogenic features for these modalities and perform a correlation analysis with expression. We predicted 611 potential oncogenes and tumor suppressors candidates by integrating these data types. Genes with a strong correlation for methylation dependent expression changes exhibited at varying copy number aberrations include CDCA8, ATAD2, CDKN2A, RAB25, AURKA, BOP1 and EIF2C3. We provide copy number variation and DNA methylation analysis for over 11,500 individual genes covering the genetic landscape of ovarian cancer tumors. We show the extent of genomic and epigenetic alterations for known tumor suppressors and oncogenes and also use these defined features to identify potential ovarian cancer gene candidates.
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Patterns of first recurrence following adjuvant intraperitoneal chemotherapy for stage IIIC ovarian cancer.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2011
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Adjuvant intraperitoneal (IP) platinum-based chemotherapy has been shown to improve outcome for patients with advanced ovarian cancer. We hypothesize that patients who have received adjuvant IP chemotherapy more commonly recur first at extraperitoneal sites than patients who have received adjuvant intravenous (IV) chemotherapy.
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Time to recurrence and survival in serous ovarian tumors predicted from integrated genomic profiles.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2011
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Serous ovarian cancer (SeOvCa) is an aggressive disease with differential and often inadequate therapeutic outcome after standard treatment. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has provided rich molecular and genetic profiles from hundreds of primary surgical samples. These profiles confirm mutations of TP53 in ~100% of patients and an extraordinarily complex profile of DNA copy number changes with considerable patient-to-patient diversity. This raises the joint challenge of exploiting all new available datasets and reducing their confounding complexity for the purpose of predicting clinical outcomes and identifying disease relevant pathway alterations. We therefore set out to use multi-data type genomic profiles (mRNA, DNA methylation, DNA copy-number alteration and microRNA) available from TCGA to identify prognostic signatures for the prediction of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS).
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An analysis of patients with bulky advanced stage ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal carcinoma treated with primary debulking surgery (PDS) during an identical time period as the randomized EORTC-NCIC trial of PDS vs neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT).
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2011
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The recent EORTC-NCIC randomized trial comparing primary debulking surgery (PDS) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) reported a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 12 months and overall survival (OS) of 30 months for both arms. Due to the equivalent survival and decreased morbidity with NACT, many now consider it the preferred approach. We analyzed the outcomes of patients treated with PDS at our institution during the same time period in which the EORTC-NCIC trial was conducted, using identical inclusion criteria.
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The role of KRAS rs61764370 in invasive epithelial ovarian cancer: implications for clinical testing.
Paul D P Pharoah, Rachel T Palmieri, Susan J Ramus, Simon A Gayther, Irene L Andrulis, Hoda Anton-Culver, Natalia Antonenkova, Antonis C Antoniou, David Goldgar, , Mary S Beattie, Matthias W Beckmann, Michael J Birrer, Natalia Bogdanova, Kelly L Bolton, Wendy Brewster, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Robert Brown, Ralf Bützow, Trinidad Caldés, Maria Adelaide Caligo, Ian Campbell, Jenny Chang-Claude, Y Ann Chen, Linda S Cook, Fergus J Couch, Daniel W Cramer, Julie M Cunningham, Evelyn Despierre, Jennifer A Doherty, Thilo Dörk, Matthias Dürst, Diana M Eccles, Arif B Ekici, Douglas Easton, Peter A Fasching, Anna de Fazio, David A Fenstermacher, James M Flanagan, Brooke L Fridley, Eitan Friedman, Bo Gao, Olga Sinilnikova, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Andrew K Godwin, Ellen L Goode, Marc T Goodman, Jenny Gross, Thomas V O Hansen, Paul Harnett, Matti Rookus, Tuomas Heikkinen, Rebecca Hein, Claus Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Edwin S Iversen, Anna Jakubowska, Sharon E Johnatty, Beth Y Karlan, Noah D Kauff, Stanley B Kaye, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Linda E Kelemen, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Diether Lambrechts, James P LaPolla, Conxi Lazaro, Nhu D Le, Arto Leminen, Karin Leunen, Douglas A Levine, Yi Lu, Lene Lundvall, Stuart MacGregor, Tamara Marees, Leon F Massuger, John R McLaughlin, Usha Menon, Marco Montagna, Kirsten B Moysich, Steven A Narod, Katherine L Nathanson, Lotte Nedergaard, Roberta B Ness, Heli Nevanlinna, Stefan Nickels, Ana Osorio, Jim Paul, Celeste Leigh Pearce, Catherine M Phelan, Malcolm C Pike, Paolo Radice, Mary Anne Rossing, Joellen M Schildkraut, Thomas A Sellers, Christian F Singer, Honglin Song, Daniel O Stram, Rebecca Sutphen, Annika Lindblom, Kathryn L Terry, Ya-Yu Tsai, Anne M Van Altena, Ignace Vergote, Robert A Vierkant, Allison F Vitonis, Christine Walsh, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Barbara Wappenschmidt, Anna H Wu, Argyrios Ziogas, Andrew Berchuck, Harvey A Risch.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2011
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An assay for the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs61764370, has recently been commercially marketed as a clinical test to aid ovarian cancer risk evaluation in women with family histories of the disease. rs67164370 is in a 3-UTR miRNA binding site of the KRAS oncogene and is a candidate for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility. However, only one published article, analyzing fewer than 1,000 subjects in total, has examined this association.
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The obesity-associated polymorphisms FTO rs9939609 and MC4R rs17782313 and endometrial cancer risk in non-Hispanic white women.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2011
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Overweight and obesity are strongly associated with endometrial cancer. Several independent genome-wide association studies recently identified two common polymorphisms, FTO rs9939609 and MC4R rs17782313, that are linked to increased body weight and obesity. We examined the association of FTO rs9939609 and MC4R rs17782313 with endometrial cancer risk in a pooled analysis of nine case-control studies within the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium (E2C2). This analysis included 3601 non-Hispanic white women with histologically-confirmed endometrial carcinoma and 5275 frequency-matched controls. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to assess the relation of FTO rs9939609 and MC4R rs17782313 genotypes to the risk of endometrial cancer. Among control women, both the FTO rs9939609 A and MC4R rs17782313 C alleles were associated with a 16% increased risk of being overweight (p?=?0.001 and p?=?0.004, respectively). In case-control analyses, carriers of the FTO rs9939609 AA genotype were at increased risk of endometrial carcinoma compared to women with the TT genotype [odds ratio (OR) ?=?1.17; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.32, p?=?0.01]. However, this association was no longer apparent after adjusting for body mass index (BMI), suggesting mediation of the gene-disease effect through body weight. The MC4R rs17782313 polymorphism was not related to endometrial cancer risk (per allele OR?=?0.98; 95% CI: 0.91-1.06; p?=?0.68). FTO rs9939609 is a susceptibility marker for white non-Hispanic women at higher risk of endometrial cancer. Although FTO rs9939609 alone might have limited clinical or public health significance for identifying women at high risk for endometrial cancer beyond that of excess body weight, further investigation of obesity-related genetic markers might help to identify the pathways that influence endometrial carcinogenesis.
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A microRNA survival signature (MiSS) for advanced ovarian cancer.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2011
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression primarily through post-transcriptional modification. We tested the hypothesis that miRNA expression is associated with overall survival in advanced ovarian cancer.
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Pathologic analysis of ex vivo plasma energy tumor destruction in patients with ovarian or peritoneal cancer.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2010
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Cytoreduction of all visible disease has been associated with improved survival in patients with advanced-stage ovarian or peritoneal cancer. This is best achieved by minimizing injury to normal tissues. We report on the tumor destruction potential, in an ex vivo model, of a novel energy source that uses an electrically neutral beam of pure plasma to vaporize tissue.
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Prognostic significance of supradiaphragmatic lymphadenopathy identified on preoperative computed tomography scan in patients undergoing primary cytoreduction for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2010
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It has been hypothesized that the supradiaphragmatic lymph nodes serve as the principal nodes for lymphatic drainage of the entire peritoneal cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of enlarged supradiaphragmatic nodes noted on preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scan in patients undergoing primary cytoreduction for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC).
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Successful eradication of established peritoneal ovarian tumors in SCID-Beige mice following adoptive transfer of T cells genetically targeted to the MUC16 antigen.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2010
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Most patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer will ultimately die from their disease. For this reason, novel approaches to the treatment of this malignancy are needed. Adoptive transfer of a patients own T cells, genetically modified ex vivo through the introduction of a gene encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeted to a tumor-associated antigen, is a novel approach to the treatment of ovarian cancer.
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Genomic and biological characterization of exon 4 KRAS mutations in human cancer.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2010
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Mutations in RAS proteins occur widely in human cancer. Prompted by the confirmation of KRAS mutation as a predictive biomarker of response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapies, limited clinical testing for RAS pathway mutations has recently been adopted. We performed a multiplatform genomic analysis to characterize, in a nonbiased manner, the biological, biochemical, and prognostic significance of Ras pathway alterations in colorectal tumors and other solid tumor malignancies. Mutations in exon 4 of KRAS were found to occur commonly and to predict for a more favorable clinical outcome in patients with colorectal cancer. Exon 4 KRAS mutations, all of which were identified at amino acid residues K117 and A146, were associated with lower levels of GTP-bound RAS in isogenic models. These same mutations were also often accompanied by conversion to homozygosity and increased gene copy number, in human tumors and tumor cell lines. Models harboring exon 4 KRAS mutations exhibited mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase dependence and resistance to EGFR-targeted agents. Our findings suggest that RAS mutation is not a binary variable in tumors, and that the diversity in mutant alleles and variability in gene copy number may also contribute to the heterogeneity of clinical outcomes observed in cancer patients. These results also provide a rationale for broader KRAS testing beyond the most common hotspot alleles in exons 2 and 3.
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A differentiation-based microRNA signature identifies leiomyosarcoma as a mesenchymal stem cell-related malignancy.
Am. J. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2010
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Smooth muscle (SM) is a spontaneously contractile tissue that provides physical support and function to organs such as the uterus. Uterine smooth muscle-related neoplasia comprise common well-differentiated benign lesions called leiomyomas (ULM), and rare, highly aggressive and pleomorphic tumors named leiomyosarcomas (ULMS). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play essential roles in normal cellular development and tissue homeostasis that can be used to accurately subclassify different tumor types. Here, we demonstrate that miRNAs are required for full smooth muscle cell (SMC) differentiation of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We also report a miRNA signature associated with this process. Moreover, we show that this signature, along with miRNA profiles for ULMS and ULM, are able to subclassify tumors of smooth muscle origin along SM differentiation. Using multiple computational analyses, we determined that ULMS are more similar to hMSCs as opposed to ULM, which are linked with more mature SMCs and myometrium. Furthermore, a comparison of the SM differentiation and ULMS miRNA signatures identified miRNAs strictly associated with SM maturation or transformation, as well as those modulated in both processes indicating a possible dual role. These results support separate origins and/or divergent transformation pathways for ULM and ULMS, resulting in drastically different states of differentiation. In summary, this work expands on our knowledge of the regulation of SM differentiation and sarcoma pathogenesis.
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Gene expression profile of BRCAness that correlates with responsiveness to chemotherapy and with outcome in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2010
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To define a gene expression profile of BRCAness that correlates with chemotherapy response and outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC).
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A phase 2 trial of erlotinib in patients with previously treated squamous cell and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus.
Cancer
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2010
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Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have activity in solid tumors. The authors evaluated an oral EGFR TKI, erlotinib, in patients with previously treated esophageal cancer.
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Postoperative intra-abdominal collections using a sodium hyaluronate-carboxymethylcellulose (HA-CMC) barrier at the time of laparotomy for uterine or cervical cancers.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2010
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A prior analysis of patients undergoing laparotomy for ovarian malignancies at our institution revealed an increased rate of intra-abdominal collections using HA-CMC film during debulking surgery. The primary objective of the current study was to determine whether the use of HA-CMC is associated with the development of postoperative intra-abdominal collections in patients undergoing laparotomy for uterine or cervical malignancies.
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Common variants at 19p13 are associated with susceptibility to ovarian cancer.
Kelly L Bolton, Jonathan Tyrer, Honglin Song, Susan J Ramus, Maria Notaridou, Chris Jones, Tanya Sher, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Eva Wozniak, Ya-Yu Tsai, Joanne Weidhaas, Daniel Paik, David J Van Den Berg, Daniel O Stram, Celeste Leigh Pearce, Anna H Wu, Wendy Brewster, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Steven A Narod, Douglas A Levine, Stanley B Kaye, Robert Brown, Jim Paul, James Flanagan, Weiva Sieh, Valerie McGuire, Alice S Whittemore, Ian Campbell, Martin E Gore, Jolanta Lissowska, Hanna P Yang, Krzysztof Mędrek, Jacek Gronwald, Jan Lubiński, Anna Jakubowska, Nhu D Le, Linda S Cook, Linda E Kelemen, Angela Brook-Wilson, Leon F A G Massuger, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Katja K H Aben, Anne M Van Altena, Richard Houlston, Ian Tomlinson, Rachel T Palmieri, Patricia G Moorman, Joellen Schildkraut, Edwin S Iversen, Catherine Phelan, Robert A Vierkant, Julie M Cunningham, Ellen L Goode, Brooke L Fridley, Susan Kruger-Kjaer, Jan Blaeker, Estrid Hogdall, Claus Hogdall, Jenny Gross, Beth Y Karlan, Roberta B Ness, Robert P Edwards, Kunle Odunsi, Kirsten B Moyisch, Julie A Baker, Francesmary Modugno, Tuomas Heikkinenen, Ralf Bützow, Heli Nevanlinna, Arto Leminen, Natalia Bogdanova, Natalia Antonenkova, Thilo Doerk, Peter Hillemanns, Matthias Dürst, Ingo Runnebaum, Pamela J Thompson, Michael E Carney, Marc T Goodman, Galina Lurie, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Rebecca Hein, Jenny Chang-Claude, Mary Anne Rossing, Kara L Cushing-Haugen, Jennifer Doherty, Chu Chen, Thorunn Rafnar, Soren Besenbacher, Patrick Sulem, Kari Stefansson, Michael J Birrer, Kathryn L Terry, Dena Hernandez, Daniel W Cramer, Ignace Vergote, Frédéric Amant, Diether Lambrechts, Evelyn Despierre, Peter A Fasching, Matthias W Beckmann, Falk C Thiel, Arif B Ekici, Xiaoqing Chen, , Sharon E Johnatty, Penelope M Webb, Jonathan Beesley, Stephen Chanock, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Tom Sellers, Douglas F Easton, Andrew Berchuck, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Paul D P Pharoah, Simon A Gayther.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2010
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Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancy in the developed world, accounting for 4% of the deaths from cancer in women. We performed a three-phase genome-wide association study of EOC survival in 8,951 individuals with EOC (cases) with available survival time data and a parallel association analysis of EOC susceptibility. Two SNPs at 19p13.11, rs8170 and rs2363956, showed evidence of association with survival (overall P = 5 × 10?? and P = 6 × 10??, respectively), but they did not replicate in phase 3. However, the same two SNPs demonstrated genome-wide significance for risk of serous EOC (P = 3 × 10?? and P = 4 × 10?¹¹, respectively). Expression analysis of candidate genes at this locus in ovarian tumors supported a role for the BRCA1-interacting gene C19orf62, also known as MERIT40, which contains rs8170, in EOC development.
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A genome-wide association study identifies susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer at 2q31 and 8q24.
Ellen L Goode, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Honglin Song, Susan J Ramus, Maria Notaridou, Kate Lawrenson, Martin Widschwendter, Robert A Vierkant, Melissa C Larson, Susanne K Kjaer, Michael J Birrer, Andrew Berchuck, Joellen Schildkraut, Ian Tomlinson, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Linda S Cook, Jacek Gronwald, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Martin E Gore, Ian Campbell, Alice S Whittemore, Rebecca Sutphen, Catherine Phelan, Hoda Anton-Culver, Celeste Leigh Pearce, Diether Lambrechts, Mary Anne Rossing, Jenny Chang-Claude, Kirsten B Moysich, Marc T Goodman, Thilo Dörk, Heli Nevanlinna, Roberta B Ness, Thorunn Rafnar, Claus Hogdall, Estrid Hogdall, Brooke L Fridley, Julie M Cunningham, Weiva Sieh, Valerie McGuire, Andrew K Godwin, Daniel W Cramer, Dena Hernandez, Douglas Levine, Karen Lu, Edwin S Iversen, Rachel T Palmieri, Richard Houlston, Anne M Van Altena, Katja K H Aben, Leon F A G Massuger, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Linda E Kelemen, Nhu D Le, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Krzysztof Mędrek, Anne Stafford, Douglas F Easton, Jonathan Tyrer, Kelly L Bolton, Patricia Harrington, Diana Eccles, Ann Chen, Ashley N Molina, Barbara N Davila, Hector Arango, Ya-Yu Tsai, Zhihua Chen, Harvey A Risch, John Mclaughlin, Steven A Narod, Argyrios Ziogas, Wendy Brewster, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Usha Menon, Anna H Wu, Daniel O Stram, Malcolm C Pike, , Jonathan Beesley, Penelope M Webb, Xiaoqing Chen, Arif B Ekici, Falk C Thiel, Matthias W Beckmann, Hannah Yang, Nicolas Wentzensen, Jolanta Lissowska, Peter A Fasching, Evelyn Despierre, Frédéric Amant, Ignace Vergote, Jennifer Doherty, Rebecca Hein, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Galina Lurie, Michael E Carney, Pamela J Thompson, Ingo Runnebaum, Peter Hillemanns, Matthias Dürst, Natalia Antonenkova, Natalia Bogdanova, Arto Leminen, Ralf Bützow, Tuomas Heikkinen, Kari Stefansson, Patrick Sulem, Soren Besenbacher, Thomas A Sellers, Simon A Gayther, Paul D P Pharoah.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2010
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Ovarian cancer accounts for more deaths than all other gynecological cancers combined. To identify common low-penetrance ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, we conducted a genome-wide association study of 507,094 SNPs in 1,768 individuals with ovarian cancer (cases) and 2,354 controls, with follow up of 21,955 SNPs in 4,162 cases and 4,810 controls, leading to the identification of a confirmed susceptibility locus at 9p22 (in BNC2). Here, we report on nine additional candidate loci (defined as having P ? 10??) identified after stratifying cases by histology, which we genotyped in an additional 4,353 cases and 6,021 controls. We confirmed two new susceptibility loci with P ? 5 × 10?? (8q24, P = 8.0 × 10?¹? and 2q31, P = 3.8 × 10?¹?) and identified two additional loci that approached genome-wide significance (3q25, P = 7.1 × 10?? and 17q21, P = 1.4 × 10??). The associations of these loci with serous ovarian cancer were generally stronger than with other cancer subtypes. Analysis of HOXD1, MYC, TIPARP and SKAP1 at these loci and of BNC2 at 9p22 supports a functional role for these genes in ovarian cancer development.
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Genetic analysis of the early natural history of epithelial ovarian carcinoma.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2010
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The high mortality rate associated with epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) reflects diagnosis commonly at an advanced stage, but improved early detection is hindered by uncertainty as to the histologic origin and early natural history of this malignancy.
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Complex atypical hyperplasia of the uterus: characteristics and prediction of underlying carcinoma risk.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2010
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The objective of the study was to identify additional factors that may improve the ability to predict underlying carcinoma risk in patients with complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH) of the uterus.
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Cancer-related infertility in survivorship.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2010
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To empirically assess and describe the emotional, sexual, and physical impact of cancer-related infertility on gynecologic cancer survivors.
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The 6q22.33 locus and breast cancer susceptibility.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2009
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Recently, we identified a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 6q22.33 following a genome-wide association study in the Ashkenazi Jewish genetic isolate. To replicate these findings, we did a case-control association analysis on 6q22.33 (rs2180341) in an additional 487 Ashkenazi Jewish breast cancer cases and in an independent non-Jewish, predominantly European American, population of 1,466 breast cancer cases and 1,467 controls. We confirmed the 6q22.33 association with breast cancer risk in the replication cohorts [per-allele odds ratio (OR), 1.18; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.04-1.33; P = 0.0083], with the strongest effect in the aggregate meta-analysis of 3,039 breast cancer cases and 2,616 Ashkenazi Jewish and non-Jewish controls (per-allele OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.13-1.36; P = 3.85 x 10(-7)). We also showed that the association was slightly stronger with estrogen receptor-positive tumors (per-allele OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.20-1.51; P = 2.2 x 10(-5)) compared with estrogen receptor-negative tumors (per-allele OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.97-1.47; P = 0.1). Furthermore, this study provides a novel insight into the functional significance of 6q22.33 in breast cancer susceptibility. Due to the stronger association of 6q22.33 with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, we examined the effect of candidate genes on estrogen receptor response elements. Upon transfection of overexpressed RNF146 in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, we observed diminished expression of an estrogen receptor response element reporter construct. This study confirms the association of 6q22.33 with breast cancer, with slightly stronger effect in estrogen receptor-positive tumors. Further functional studies of candidate genes are in progress, and a large replication analysis is being completed as part of an international consortium.
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Improving sentinel lymph node detection rates in endometrial cancer: how many cases are needed?
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2009
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To describe sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection rates in endometrial cancer and estimate how many cases are needed to achieve >90% SLN detection.
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Postoperative intra-abdominal collections using a sodium hyaluronate-carboxymethylcellulose (HA-CMC) barrier at the time of laparotomy for ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancers.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2009
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To determine whether HA-CMC was associated with the development of postoperative intra-abdominal collections in patients undergoing laparotomy for ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal malignancies.
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Intraepithelial T cells and tumor proliferation: impact on the benefit from surgical cytoreduction in advanced serous ovarian cancer.
Cancer
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2009
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The aim of the study was to determine whether tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and/or tumor mitotic activity could identify subgroups of patients with advanced serous epithelial ovarian cancer who would maximally benefit from aggressive surgical cytoreduction.
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Exploratory analysis of serum CA-125 response to surgery and the risk of relapse in patients with FIGO stage IIIC ovarian cancer.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2009
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To analyze whether serum CA-125 response to cytoreductive surgery before initiation of postoperative chemotherapy is associated with progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with stage IIIC ovarian carcinoma.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.