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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Prescribing and Regulating Exercise with RPE after Heart Transplant: A Pilot Study.
Med Sci Sports Exerc
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2014
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To analyze the use of 6-20 rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale for prescribing and self-regulating heated water-based exercise (HEx) and land-based exercise (LEx) in heart transplant recipients.
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Myocardial gene expression of T-bet, GATA-3, Ror-?t, FoxP3, and hallmark cytokines in chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy: an essentially unopposed TH1-type response.
Mediators Inflamm.
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2014
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Chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), a late consequence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy with prognosis worse than those of noninflammatory etiology (NIC). Although the T cell-rich myocarditis is known to play a pathogenetic role, the relative contribution of each of the functional T cell subsets has never been thoroughly investigated. We therefore assessed gene expression of cytokines and transcription factors involved in differentiation and effector function of each functional T cell subset (TH1/TH2/TH17/Treg) in CCC, NIC, and heart donor myocardial samples.
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MicroRNAs miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, miR-208a and miR-208b are dysregulated in Chronic Chagas disease Cardiomyopathy.
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2014
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Chagas disease is caused by an intracellular parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, and it is a leading cause of heart failure in Latin America. The main clinical consequence of the infection is the development of a Chronic Chagas disease Cardiomyopathy (CCC), which is characterized by myocarditis, hypertrophy and fibrosis and affects about 30% of infected patients. CCC has a worse prognosis than other cardiomyopathies, like idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). It is well established that myocardial gene expression patterns are altered in CCC, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences are not clear. MicroRNAs are recently discovered regulators of gene expression, and are recognized as important factors in heart development and cardiovascular disorders (CD). We analyzed the expression of nine different miRNAs in myocardial tissue samples of CCC patients in comparison to DCM patients and samples from heart transplant donors. Using the results of a cDNA microarray database on CCC and DCM myocardium, signaling networks were built and nodal molecules were identified.
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NHETS - Necropsy Heart Transplantation Study.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2014
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Discrepancies between pre and post-mortem diagnoses are reported in the literature, ranging from 4.1 to 49.8 % in cases referred for necropsy, with important impact on patient treatment.
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Heated water-based exercise training reduces 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure levels in resistant hypertensive patients: a randomized controlled trial (HEx trial).
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2014
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Regular exercise is an effective intervention to decrease blood pressure (BP) in hypertension, but no data are available concerning the effects of heated water-based exercise (HEx). This study examines the effects of HEx on BP in resistant hypertensive patients.
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Current strategies for preventing renal dysfunction in patients with heart failure: a heart failure stage approach.
Clinics (Sao Paulo)
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2013
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Renal dysfunction is common during episodes of acute decompensated heart failure, and historical data indicate that the mean creatinine level at admission has risen in recent decades. Different mechanisms underlying this change over time have been proposed, such as demographic changes, hemodynamic and neurohumoral derangements and medical interventions. In this setting, various strategies have been proposed for the prevention of renal dysfunction with heterogeneous results. In the present article, we review and discuss the main aspects of renal dysfunction prevention according to the different stages of heart failure.
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The reality of heart failure in Latin America.
J. Am. Coll. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2013
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Heart failure (HF) data in Latin America (LA) were reviewed to guide health service planning in the prevention and treatment of HF. The HF epidemiology and the adequacy of relevant health service provision related to HF in LA are not well delineated. A systematic search of the electronic databases and the World Health Organization website was undertaken for HF in LA. LA countries have reduced gross income and lower total expenditure on health per capita. LA is a heterogeneous region with HF risk factors of developed and nondeveloped countries, including lower risk of raised blood glucose levels, obesity, tobacco, and aging, whereas systemic hypertension (SH), rheumatic fever, and Chagas disease (CD) are higher in LA. Main etiologies of HF in LA are idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (from 1.3% to 37%), CD (from 1.3% to 21%), ischemic (from 68% to 17%), SH (from 14% to 76%), valvular (from 3% to 22%), and alcohol related (from 1.1% to 8%). The prognosis of CD HF is worse than for other etiologies. Chronic HF is the cause of death in 6.3% of cases. Decompensated HF is the main cause of cardiovascular hospitalization. The prevalence of systolic HF varies from 64% to 69%. LA is under the awful paradox of having the HF risk factors and HF epidemiology of developed countries with the added factors of SH, CD, and rheumatic fever. Overall, in the scenario of lower total expenditure on health per capita and lower gross national income per capita, new strategies are essential for prevention and treatment of HF in LA.
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Heart failure in South America.
Curr Cardiol Rev
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2013
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Continued assessment of temporal trends in mortality and epidemiology of specific heart failure in South America is needed to provide a scientific basis for rational allocation of the limited health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk and predict the future burden of heart failure. The epidemiology of heart failure in South America was reviewed. Heart failure is the main cause of hospitalization based on available data from approximately 50% of the South American population. The main etiologies of heart failure are ischemic, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, valvular, hypertensive and chagasic etiologies. In endemic areas, Chagas heart disease may be responsible by 41% of the HF cases. Also, heart failure presents high mortality especially in patients with Chagas etiology. Heart failure and etiologies associated with heart failure may be responsible for 6.3% of causes of deaths. Rheumatic fever is the leading cause of valvular heart disease. However, a tendency to reduction of HF mortality due to Chagas heart disease from 1985 to 2006, and reduction in mortality due to HF from 1999 to 2005 were observed in selected states in Brazil. The findings have important public health implications because the allocation of health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk of heart failure should also consider the control of neglected Chagas disease and rheumatic fever in South American countries.
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Exercise capacity in early and late adult heart transplant recipients.
Cardiol J
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2013
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The aim of this study was to compare peak oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (HR) reserve and HR recovery in early and late heart transplant recipients. Moreover, we also aimed to correlate peak VO2 and HR reserve.
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Randomized and comparative study between two intra-hospital exercise programs for heart transplant patients.
Rev Bras Cir Cardiovasc
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
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To compare the effects of two physical therapy exercise in-hospital programs in pulmonary function and functional capacity of patients in the postoperative period of heart transplantation.
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Chagas cardiomyopathy: the economic burden of an expensive and neglected disease.
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2013
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Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC) is a rising etiology for heart failure (HF) that previously was restricted to some countries of Latin America. The chronic CC cases cause now a profound socio-economic impact. However this issue has not been well studied if compared to other causes of HF. The objective of this study was to assess the cost burden of CC during acute decompensated HF admissions (ADHF), and compare this cost to the other etiologies of HF.
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Polymorphism in the alpha cardiac muscle actin 1 gene is associated to susceptibility to chronic inflammatory cardiomyopathy.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America, and may lead to a life-threatening inflammatory dilated, chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). One third of T. cruzi-infected individuals progress to CCC while the others remain asymptomatic (ASY). A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Since mutations in multiple sarcomeric genes, including alpha-cardiac actin (ACTC1) have been involved in hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy, we investigated the involvement of the ACTC1 gene in CCC pathogenesis.
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Physical training in Becker muscular dystrophy associated with heart failure.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2011
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Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) integrates dystrophy occurring due to genetic mutations that express the dystrophin protein in chromosome X. The onset of neuromuscular symptoms usually precedes the impairment of cardiac function, and may conversely happen by heart failure (HF). Physical training is well established in HF, however, when combined with BMD, it is controversial and without any scientific basis. This study presents the case of a patient with BMD associated with HF in cardiac transplant waiting list undergoing a physical training program.
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The first cardiac transplant experience in a patient with mucopolysaccharidosis.
Cardiovasc. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2011
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Hunter syndrome (MPSII) is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder that can affect multiple systems but primarily affects the heart. We report the case of a previously asymptomatic 23-year-old patient who had an attenuated form of MPSII and presented with refractory heart failure that required a heart transplant. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of an increase in urinary excretion of glycosaminoglycans, a deficiency in enzymatic activity, and molecular analysis. A myocardial biopsy revealed hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, mild fibrosis, and lysosomal storage in interstitial cells. Molecular analysis identified a novel mutation in the iduronate-2-sulfatase gene. Although the clinical outcome was not favorable, we believe that this approach may be valid in end-stage heart failure.
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Effects of the recombinant form of the natural human B-type natriuretic peptide and levosimendan on pulmonary hyperventilation and chemosensivity in heart failure.
Cardiovasc Ther
PUBLISHED: 08-03-2011
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The origin of dyspnea in chronic heart failure (HF) is multifactorial, and excessive ventilation is thought to play a role in inducing this symptom. Chemosensivity is augmented in HF, correlates with increased pulmonary ventilation (VE), and is an adverse prognostic marker. Despite increased blood levels of natriuretic peptides in clinical conditions associated with dyspnea, their effect on pulmonary VE and chemoreceptor activity remains unexplored.
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I Latin American Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Chagas heart disease: executive summary.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2011
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Much has been achieved in one century after Carlos Chagas discovery. However, there is surely much to be done in the next decades. At present, we are witnessing many remarkable efforts to monitor the epidemiology of the disease, to better understand the biology of the T. cruzi and its interaction with human beings as well as the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of the complications in the chronic phase, and deal more appropriately and effectively with late cardiac and digestive manifestations. Although the vector and transfusion-derived transmission of the disease has been controlled in many countries, there remains a pressing need for sustained surveillance of the measures that led to this achievement. It is also necessary to adopt initiatives that enable appropriate management of social and medical conditions resulting from the migration of infected individuals to countries where the disease formerly did not exist. Its also necessary to standardize the most reliable methods of detection of infection with T. cruzi, not only for diagnosis purposes, but more crucially, as a cure criterion. The etiological treatment of millions of patients in the chronic stage of the disease is also to be unraveled. A renewed interest in this area is observed, including prospects of studies focusing on the association of drugs with benznidazole. We also wait for full evidence of the actual effectiveness of the etiological treatment to impact favorably on the natural history of the disease in its chronic phase. Eventually, cardiologists are primarily responsible for improving the clinical management of their patients with Chagas disease, judiciously prescribing drugs and interventions that respect, as much as possible, the peculiar pathophysiology of the disease, wasting no plausible therapeutic opportunities.
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Pilates in heart failure patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial.
Cardiovasc Ther
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2011
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Conventional cardiac rehabilitation program consist of 15 min of warm-up, 30 min of aerobic exercise and followed by 15 min calisthenics exercise. The Pilates method has been increasingly applied for its therapeutic benefits, however little scientific evidence supports or rebukes its use as a treatment in patients with heart failure (HF).
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Ergoreflex activity in heart failure.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2011
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A large body of evidence has suggested the existence of a reflex network that becomes hyperactive secondary to musculoskeletal alterations that occur in heart failure (HF) syndrome. Together with sympathoinhibitory cardiovascular reflexes, suppressed in the presence of the syndrome, heart failure can contribute to physical exercise intolerance. The hyperactivation of signals originated from receptors located in skeletal muscles (mechanoreceptors - metaboreceptors) is a recently proposed hypothesis to explain the origin of fatigue and dyspnea symptoms in HF. In HF, other alterations in the reflex control system, which are not mutually exclusive, contribute to dyspnea. The inappropriate stimulation of the arterial baroreceptors, with the consequent lack of inhibition of the muscle metaboreflex and carotid chemoreflex unloading and the increase in the renal vasoconstriction with angiotensin II release can also be considered. Although the functional alterations of the reflexes were used independently to illustrate the sympathetic excitation observed in HF, the interaction between these reflexes under normal and pathological conditions, especially its contribution to the sympathoexcitatory state found in HF, has not been broadly investigated. Therefore, questions about a possible association between the muscle receptors (mechano and metaboreceptors) in the genesis of the ergoreflex exacerbation, observed in HF, remain. Thus, the objective of this review was to integrate the knowledge on the mechano and metaboreflex (ergoreflex) in HF syndrome, as well as to clarify the influence of HF drug therapy on the ergoreflex.
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Qualitative and quantitative real time myocardial contrast echocardiography for detecting hibernating myocardium.
Echocardiography
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2011
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Real time myocardial contrast echocardiography (RTMCE) is an emerging imaging modality for assessing myocardial perfusion that allows for noninvasive quantification of regional myocardial blood flow (MBF). Aim: We sought to assess the value of qualitative analysis of myocardial perfusion and quantitative assessment of myocardial blood flow (MBF) by RTMCE for predicting regional function recovery in patients with ischemic heart disease who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).
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Hemodynamic response in one session of strength exercise with and without electrostimulation in heart failure patients: A randomized controlled trial.
Cardiol J
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2011
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Studies have investigated the influence of neuromuscular electrostimulation on the exercise/muscle capacity of patients with heart failure (HF), but the hemodynamic overload has never been investigated. The aim of our study was to evaluate the heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressures in one session of strength exercises with and without neuromuscular electrostimulation (quadriceps) in HF patients and in healthy subjects.
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Behavior of central and peripheral chemoreflexes in heart failure.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2011
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The heart failure (HF) syndrome can be defined as the final pathway of any type of heart disease. The sympatho-inhibitory cardiovascular reflexes, such as the arterial baroreceptor reflex, are significantly decreased in HF. Patients with HF present higher ventilation for a certain workload when compared with normal individuals. This fact generates low ventilatory efficiency and is related to higher ventilation associated with the carbon dioxide production, which is a predictor of bad prognosis, in addition to being a limiting factor for the practice of exercises. There is evidence that the autonomic imbalance contributes to the pathogenesis and the progression of heart failure. The chemoreflexes are the main mechanisms of control and regulation of the ventilatory responses to the changes in concentrations of arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide. The chemoreflex activation causes an increase in the sympathetic activity, heart rate, arterial pressure and minute volume. However, the increase in the minute volume and the arterial pressure, due to negative feedback, cause inhibition of the sympathetic response at the chemoreflex activation. In spite of the functional alterations of the reflexes, their behavior in normal and pathological conditions, especially their contribution to the sympathoexcitatory state observed in HF has not been broadly studied. Therefore, this review aims at integrating the knowledge on central and peripheral chemoreflexes in HF syndrome, as well as clarifying the influence of the heart failure drug therapy on the chemoreflexes.
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Validation of the London Chest Activity of Daily Living scale in patients with heart failure.
J Rehabil Med
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2010
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The Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) is a well-validated, commonly-used tool to assess quality of life in patients with heart failure. However, it lacks specific information concerning breathlessness during daily activities.
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Exercise chemosensitivity in heart failure: ventilatory, chronotropic and neurohormonal responses.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-13-2010
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Heart failure (HF) is associated with resting increased peripheral and central chemosensitivity which may correlate with an increased ventilatory response to exercise. However, its sensitivity in HF during exercise was never really reported.
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Effect of a sequential education and monitoring programme on quality-of-life components in heart failure.
Eur. J. Heart Fail.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2010
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Trials of disease management programmes (DMP) in heart failure (HF) have shown controversial results regarding quality of life. We hypothesized that a DMP applied over the long-term could produce different effects on each of the quality-of-life components.
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Aerobic exercise prescription in adult heart transplant recipients: a review.
Cardiovasc Ther
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2010
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Heart transplantation is a gold-standard treatment for selected patients in the terminal stages of heart failure and it can improve patients quality of life, exercise capacity, and survival. Despite of the exercise performance in heart transplant recipients increases with respect to pre-transplantation, it still remains subnormal when compared with healthy subjects. Exercise training is an important nonpharmacological tool in heart transplant recipients to improve the exercise capacity, muscle strength, quality of life, and the chronotropic response. Despite this there is no consensus about what methods of aerobic exercise prescription are more adequate.
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Physical activity profile in heart failure patients from a Brazilian tertiary cardiology hospital.
Cardiol J
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2010
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Physical activity (PA) has proven benefits in the primary prevention of heart diseases such as heart failure (HF). Although it is well known, HF PA habits and physicians advice have been poorly described. The aim of this study was to investigate if physicians were advising HF patients to exercise and to quantify patients exercise profiles in a complex cardiology hospital.
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[Reduction of central sleep apnea in heart failure patients with beta-blockers therapy].
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2010
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Sleep apneas are frequent in patients with heart failure (HF). Estimate of the pre-beta blocker age (BB) point out to 45% of central apneas in these patients.
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Endoscopic left sympathetic blockade in the treatment for dilated cardiomyopathy.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2010
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The level of sympathetic nervous activity is a major determinant of prognosis in patients with heart failure.
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The carvedilols beta-blockade in heart failure and exercise trainings sympathetic blockade in healthy athletes during the rest and peak effort.
Cardiovasc Ther
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2010
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In recent years, beta-blocker therapy has become a primary pharmacologic intervention in patients with heart failure by blocking the sympathetic activity. To compare the exercise trainings sympathetic blockade in healthy subjects (athletes) and the carvedilols sympathetic blockade in sedentary heart failure patients by the evaluation of the heart rate dynamic during an exercise test. A total of 26 optimized and 49 nonoptimized heart failure patients in a stable condition (for, at least, 3 months), 15 healthy athletes and 17 sedentary healthy subjects were recruited to perform a cardiopulmonary exercise test. The heart rate dynamic (rest, reserve, peak and the peak heart rate in relation to the maximum predicted for age) was analyzed and compared between the four groups. The heart rate reserve was the same between optimized (48 +/- 15) and nonoptimized (49 +/- 18) heart failure patients (P < 0.0001). The athletes (188 +/- 9) showed a larger heart rate reserve compared to sedentary healthy subjects (92 +/- 10, P < 0.0001). Athletes and healthy sedentary reached the maximum age-predicted heart ratefor their age, but none of the heart failure patients did. The carvedilols sympathetic blockade occurred during the rest and during the peak effort in the same proportion, but the exercise trainings sympathetic blockade in healthy subjects occurred mainly in the rest.
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Effects of continuous vs. interval exercise training on blood pressure and arterial stiffness in treated hypertension.
Hypertens. Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2010
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Exercise is an effective intervention for treating hypertension and arterial stiffness, but little is known about which exercise modality is the most effective in reducing arterial stiffness and blood pressure in hypertensive subjects. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of continuous vs. interval exercise training on arterial stiffness and blood pressure in hypertensive patients. Sixty-five patients with hypertension were randomized to 16 weeks of continuous exercise training (n=26), interval training (n=26) or a sedentary routine (n=13). The training was conducted in two 40-min sessions a week. Assessment of arterial stiffness by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurement and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were performed before and after the 16 weeks of training. At the end of the study, ABPM blood pressure had declined significantly only in the subjects with higher basal values and was independent of training modality. PWV had declined significantly only after interval training from 9.44+/-0.91 to 8.90+/-0.96 m s(-1), P=0.009 (continuous from 10.15+/-1.66 to 9.98+/-1.81 m s(-1), P=ns; control from 10.23+/-1.82 to 10.53+/-1.97 m s(-1), P=ns). Continuous and interval exercise training were beneficial for blood pressure control, but only interval training reduced arterial stiffness in treated hypertensive subjects.
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Transplantation for Chagas disease: an overview of immunosuppression and reactivation in the last two decades.
Clin Transplant
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2010
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Over the last 20 yr, the immunosuppression protocols in chagasic heart-transplanted patients have gone through three phases, and we have identified several changes and discoveries about Chagas disease reactivation, mortality, and neoplasia development. The first phase was especially important because until that time, Chagas disease was an absolute contraindication for transplantation. The second phase started when an adjustment was made to the immunosuppression protocol, a lower dosage being adopted to avoid adverse effects, especially neoplasias and reactivation episodes. Currently, strategies to change the immunosuppression, especially replacement of mycophenolate mofetil by azathioprine or low doses of mycophenolate in this special situation, have been shown to be effective in reducing Chagas disease reactivation. Cardiac transplantation for Chagas disease is a reality. Although patients with Chagas disease may experience particular complications when undergoing transplantation compared with transplantation for other etiologies, these difficulties are well known, and treatment and preventive strategies are also better established. In other organs and tissues, transplantation in patients with Chagas disease also has good outcomes. Blood monitoring for parasitemias is mandatory as is the institution of therapy in the case of a reactivation diagnosis. Acute Chagas disease may occur in patients who received organs from donors with Chagas disease.
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Norepinephrine remains increased in the six-minute walking test after heart transplantation.
Clinics (Sao Paulo)
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2010
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We sought to evaluate the neurohormonal activity in heart transplant recipients and compare it with that in heart failure patients and healthy subjects during rest and just after a 6-minute walking test.
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Validation of the Portuguese version of the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-20-2009
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The Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) is an important measurement instrument for assessing the quality of life of heart failure patients. Despite being largely used within our context, the questionnaire had not yet been translated and validated into the Portuguese language.
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Correlation between CD34+ and exercise capacity, functional class, quality of life and norepinephrine in heart failure patients.
Cardiol J
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2009
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A previous study associated CD34(+) levels with NYHA functional class in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to correlate CD34(+) levels to exercise capacity, functional class, quality of life and norepinephrine in heart failure patients.
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Nutritional status and adequacy of energy and nutrient intakes among heart failure patients.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2009
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Increased knowledge about nutritional status and energy and nutrient intakes is required to improve the treatment of patients with heart failure (HF).
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The Borg scale as an important tool of self-monitoring and self-regulation of exercise prescription in heart failure patients during hydrotherapy. A randomized blinded controlled trial.
Circ. J.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2009
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The Borg Scale may be a useful tool for heart failure patients to self-monitor and self-regulate exercise on land or in water (hydrotherapy) by maintaining the heart rate (HR) between the anaerobic threshold and respiratory compensation point.
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The relationship between heart rate and oxygen consumption in heart transplant recipients during a cardiopulmonary exercise test: heart rate dynamic during exercise test.
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2009
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In healthy subjects, the percentage of heart rate reserve (%HRR) versus the percentage of oxygen consumption reserve (%VO(2)R) is the closest relationship between heart rate and VO(2) and it seems also to be true to heart failure patients only if they are under optimized beta-blocker therapy.
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Transfer of cholesterol and other lipids from a lipid nanoemulsion to high-density lipoprotein in heart transplant patients.
J. Heart Lung Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2009
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Beyond the first year after a heart transplant (HT) procedure, patients often develop dyslipidemias, which may be implicated in the genesis of transplant coronary heart disease. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) has a several anti-atherogenic properties, but the status of HDL in HT patients is still controversial. Nonetheless, determination of HDL cholesterol concentration is not sufficient for evaluation of the overall HDL protective role. In this study, a fundamental functional property of HDL, the ability to simultaneously receive the major lipid classes, was tested in HT patients.
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Heart rate dynamics in heart transplantation patients during a treadmill cardiopulmonary exercise test: a pilot study.
Cardiol J
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2009
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One way of defining an individuals heart effort is to calculate the maximum heart rate to be expected given their age, but the reinnervation seen in patients who have received heart transplants makes for different calculations from patients who have suffered heart failure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate heart rate dynamics (rest, peak and percentage of predicted heart rate for age) in heart transplant patients compared to optimized beta-blocked heart failure patients during a treadmill cardiopulmonary exercise test.
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Impact of sublingual sildenafil on pulmonary hypertension in patients with heart failure.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2009
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Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a factor of poor prognosis in the postoperative period of heart transplant (HT) and thus, the study of the degree of reversibility to vasodilators is mandatory during the preoperative assessment.
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Heart rate dynamic during an exercise test in heart failure patients with different sensibilities of the carvedilol therapy: heart rate dynamic during exercise test.
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2009
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Some trials suggest that the titration of Carvedilol is based on rest heart rate from 50 to 60 bpm and a target daily dose of 50 mg/day.
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MicroRNAs: new players in heart failure.
Mol. Biol. Rep.
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding small RNAs representing one of the most exciting areas of modern medical science. miRNAs modulate a large and complex regulatory network of gene expression of the majority of the protein-coding genes. Currently, evidences suggest that miRNAs play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Some miRNAs as miR-1, miR-133 and miR-208a are highly expressed in the heart and strongly associated with the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Recent data indicate that these miRNAs as well as miR-206 change their expression quickly in response to physical activity. The differential regulation of miRNAs in response to exercise suggests a potential value of circulating miRNAs (c-miRNAs) as biomarkers of physiological mediators of the cardiovascular adaptation induced by exercise. Likewise, serum levels of c-miRNAs such as miR-423-5p have been evaluated as potential biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of heart failure. On the other hand, the manipulation of miRNAs levels using techniques such as miR mimics and antagomiRs is becoming evident the enormous potential of miRNAs as promising therapeutic strategies in heart failure.
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Myocardial chemokine expression and intensity of myocarditis in Chagas cardiomyopathy are controlled by polymorphisms in CXCL9 and CXCL10.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
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Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), a life-threatening inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy, affects 30% of the approximately 8 million patients infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. Even though the Th1 T cell-rich myocarditis plays a pivotal role in CCC pathogenesis, little is known about the factors controlling inflammatory cell migration to CCC myocardium.
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Age-related maximum heart rate among ischemic and nonischemic heart failure patients receiving ?-blockade therapy.
J. Card. Fail.
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Equations to predict maximum heart rate (HR(max)) in heart failure (HF) patients receiving ?-adrenergic blocking (BB) agents do not consider the cause of HF. We determined equations to predict HR(max) in patients with ischemic and nonischemic HF receiving BB therapy.
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The emerging role of miR-208a in the heart.
DNA Cell Biol.
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of regulatory small RNAs that have fundamentally transformed our understanding of how gene networks are regulated representing one of the most exciting areas of the modern cardiology research. Among all known miRNAs, miR-208a is one of the most important heart-enriched miRNA playing a crucial role in the heart health and disease. miR-208a is a member of a miRNA family that also included miR-208b and is encoded by an intronic region of the Myh6 gene. Within the heart, miR-208a and miR-208b are involved in the regulation of the myosin heavy chain isoformswitch during development and in pathophysiological conditions. miR-208a is sufficient to induce arrhythmias, cardiac remodeling, and to regulate the expression of hypertrophy pathway components and the cardiac conduction system. Recently, the identification of miR-208a in the bloodstream has led to a great clinical interest to use this molecule as a potential noninvasive biomarker of myocardial injuries.
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Sildenafil vs. sodium before nitroprusside for the pulmonary hypertension reversibility test before cardiac transplantation.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
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Pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis after cardiac transplantation. The pulmonary hypertension reversibility test with sodium nitroprusside (SNP) is associated with a high rate of systemic arterial hypotension, ventricular dysfunction of the transplanted graft and high rates of disqualification from transplantation.
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Physical exercise and microRNAs: new frontiers in heart failure.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
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Although the impact of exercise on survival of patients with heart failure has been recently questioned, exercise training improves quality of life, functional capacity, inflammation, endothelial and autonomic function. In recent years, interest has increased regarding a group of small non-protein coding RNAs called microRNAs. Studies have shown that the expression of these molecules changes in several pathological conditions, such as myocardial infarction, myocardial ischemia and heart failure, and when clinical improvement occurs, they seem to normalize. With the potential for practical applicability, markers that may be useful in diagnostic and prognostic assessment of heart failure have been identified, such as miR-423-5p. In addition, results of experimental studies have indicated that there are potential therapeutic effects of microRNAs. MicroRNAs are involved in the regulation of gene expression during fetal development and in adult individuals, increasing or decreasing in the heart in response to physiological stress, injury or hemodynamic overload. Thus, the study of the behavior of these molecules in physical exercise has brought important information about the effects of this therapeutic modality and represents a new era in the understanding of heart failure. This review aims to integrate the evidence on microRNAs in heart failure with greater relevance in the study of physical exercise.
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MicroRNAs: a new paradigm in the treatment and diagnosis of heart failure?
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of newly discovered small RNAs, non-coding, which represent one of the most exciting areas of modern medical science as they modulate a huge and complex regulatory network of gene expression. Lines of evidence have recently suggested that miRNAs play a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Some miRNAs highly expressed in the heart, such as miR-1, miR-133 and miR-208, are strongly associated with the development of cardiac hypertrophy, while the exact role of miR-21 in the cardiovascular system remains controversial. Serum levels of circulating miRNAs such as miR-423-5p are being evaluated as potential biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of heart failure. On the other hand, the manipulation of levels of miRNAs using techniques such as mimicking the miRNAs (miRmimics) and antagonistic miRNAs (antagomiRs) is making increasingly evident the enormous potential of miRNAs as promising therapeutic strategies in heart failure.
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Clinical usefulness of coronary angiography in patients with left ventricular dysfunction.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
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Performing a coronary angiography in patients with heart failure of unknown etiology is often justified by the diagnostic assessment of ischemic heart disease. However, the clinical benefit of this strategy is not known.
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Endothelial function in pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy: a new frontier.
Clinics (Sao Paulo)
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Although it is known that obesity, diabetes, and Kawasakis disease play important roles in systemic inflammation and in the development of both endothelial dysfunction and cardiomyopathy, there is a lack of data regarding the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children suffering from cardiomyopathy. In this study, we performed a systematic review of the literature on pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy to assess the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy. We searched the published literature indexed in PubMed, Bireme and SciELO using the keywords endothelial, children, pediatric and infant and then compiled a systematic review. The end points were age, the pubertal stage, sex differences, the method used for the endothelial evaluation and the endothelial values themselves. No studies on children with cardiomyopathy were found. Only 11 papers were selected for our complete analysis, where these included reports on the flow-mediated percentage dilatation, the values of which were 9.80±1.80, 5.90±1.29, 4.50±0.70, and 7.10±1.27 for healthy, obese, diabetic and pre-pubertal children with Kawasakis disease, respectively. There was no significant difference in the dilatation, independent of the endothelium, either among the groups or between the genders for both of the measurements in children; similar results have been found in adolescents and adults. The endothelial function in cardiomyopathic children remains unclear because of the lack of data; nevertheless, the known dysfunctions in children with obesity, type 1 diabetes and Kawasakis disease may influence the severity of the cardiovascular symptoms, the prognosis, and the mortality rate. The results of this study encourage future research into the consequences of endothelial dysfunction in pre-pubertal children.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.