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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Gastrointestinal involvement in systemic sclerosis.
Presse Med
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2014
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Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune chronic disease characterised by microvascular, muscular and immunologic abnormalities that lead to progressive and systemic deposition of connective tissue in the skin and internal organs. The gastrointestinal tract is often overlooked by physicians but it is the most affected organ after the skin, from the mouth to the anus. Indeed, 80% of SSc patients may present with gastrointestinal involvement. Gastrointestinal manifestations range from bloating and heartburn to dysphagia and anorectal dysfunction to severe weight loss and malabsorption. However, the gastrointestinal involvement is rarely the direct cause of death, but has great impact on quality of life and leads to several comorbidities that subsequently affect patients' survival. Treatments, including nutritional support and prokinetics provide limited benefits and do not arrest the progressive course of the disease, but earlier detection of gastrointestinal involvement may reduce the risk of complications such as malnutrition.
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Low serum trough levels are associated with post-surgical recurrence in Crohn's disease patients undergoing prophylaxis with adalimumab.
Dig Liver Dis
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2014
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Whether therapeutic drug monitoring of biologic therapy can predict the efficacy of adalimumab to prevent postoperative Crohn's disease recurrence is unknown.
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Ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand: how to do.
Eur J Radiol
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2014
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Ultrasound has emerged as a low-cost, radiation-free and effective imaging technique to detect joint abnormalities and to guide percutaneous procedures. Being superficial, wrist and hand tendons and joints represent a good target to perform such procedures using ultrasound guidance. This kind of approach allows for a clear and real-time visualization of the needles during their whole path. In this setting, the knowledge of technical aspects and tips is essential to act in the most accurate way on target tissues that can be as small as a few millimetres. The aim of this review is to summarize the local treatments of inflammatory and degenerative disease described in literature (such as treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis, trigger finger, trapezio-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis, etc.), emphasizing precautions and tricks based on day-by-day experience that may help to improve the outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand.
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EAES recommendations for the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.
Surg Endosc
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2014
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Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most frequent benign disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Management of GERD has always been controversial since modern medical therapy is very effective, but laparoscopic fundoplication is one of the few procedures that were quickly adapted to the minimal access technique. The purpose of this project was to analyze the current knowledge on GERD in regard to its pathophysiology, diagnostic assessment, medical therapy, and surgical therapy, and special circumstances such as GERD in children, Barrett's esophagus, and enteroesophageal and duodenogastroesophageal reflux.
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Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.
World J Gastrointest Pharmacol Ther
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2014
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Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.
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Dysmotility and reflux disease.
Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
PUBLISHED: 11-19-2013
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In the last decade, with the advent of new oesophageal testing [i.e. 24-h impedance-pH monitoring, combined impedance-manometry, high-resolution manometry (HRM)], relevant progress in understanding the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) has been made, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. The aim of our review is to report the state-of-the-art about oesophageal motor disorders in patients with reflux disease and to stimulate new research in this field.
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Optimal treatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.
Ther Adv Chronic Dis
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2013
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Laryngopharyngeal reflux is defined as the reflux of gastric content into larynx and pharynx. A large number of data suggest the growing prevalence of laryngopharyngeal symptoms in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, laryngopharyngeal reflux is a multifactorial syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease is not the only cause involved in its pathogenesis. Current critical issues in diagnosing laryngopharyngeal reflux are many nonspecific laryngeal symptoms and signs, and poor sensitivity and specificity of all currently available diagnostic tests. Although it is a pragmatic clinical strategy to start with empiric trials of proton pump inhibitors, many patients with suspected laryngopharyngeal reflux have persistent symptoms despite maximal acid suppression therapy. Overall, there are scant conflicting results to assess the effect of reflux treatments (including dietary and lifestyle modification, medical treatment, antireflux surgery) on laryngopharyngeal reflux. The present review is aimed at critically discussing the current treatment options in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux, and provides a perspective on the development of new therapies.
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Overlap of functional heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease with irritable bowel syndrome.
World J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2013
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Several studies indicate a significant degree of overlap between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Likewise, both functional heartburn (FH) and IBS are functional digestive disorders that may occur in the same patients. However, data establishing a solid link between FH and IBS are lacking, mainly because the clinical definition of FH has undergone substantial changes over the years. The available literature on the overlap between GERD or FH and IBS highlights considerable heterogeneity in terms of the criteria and diagnostic procedures used to assess heartburn and IBS. In particular, several epidemiological studies included patients with concomitant IBS and GERD without any attempt to distinguish FH (as defined by the Rome III criteria) from GERD via pathophysiological investigations. Independent of these critical issues, there is preliminary evidence supporting a significant degree of FH-IBS overlap. This underscores the need for studies based on updated diagnostic criteria and accurate pathophysiological classifications, particularly to distinguish FH from GERD. This distinction would represent an essential starting point to achieving a better understanding of pathophysiology in the subclasses of patients with GERD and FH and properly assessing the different degrees of overlap between IBS and the subcategories of heartburn.The present review article intends to appraise and critically discuss current evidence supporting a possible concomitance of GERD or FH with IBS in the same patients and to highlight the pathophysiological relationships between these disorders.
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Defining esophageal landmarks, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and Barretts esophagus.
Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2013
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The following paper on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and Barretts esophagus (BE) includes commentaries on defining esophageal landmarks; new techniques for evaluating upper esophageal sphincter (UES) tone; differential diagnosis of GERD, BE, and hiatal hernia (HH); the use of high-resolution manometry for evaluation of reflux; the role of fundic relaxation in reflux; the use of 24-h esophageal pH-impedance testing in differentiating acid from nonacid reflux and its potential inclusion in future Rome criteria; classification of endoscopic findings in GERD; the search for the cell origin that generates BE; and the relationship between BE, Barretts carcinoma, and obesity.
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Functional testing: pharyngeal pH monitoring and high-resolution manometry.
Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2013
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The following paper on functional testing of the pharynx includes commentaries on the use of 24-h pH-impedance testing to identify patients with nonacid reflux and the caveats associated with automatic and visual analysis; the potential diagnostic yield of ambulatory high-resolution manomentry (HRM), particularly in identifying non-cardiac chest pain and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations; the differential manometric identification of conditions facilitated by using solid swallows, and the advantages of the newly developed ResTech oropharyngeal pH probe in the detection of proximal reflux events.
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Endotherapy for and tailored approaches to treating GERD, and refractory GERD.
Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2013
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This paper presents commentaries on how endoluminal antireflux procedures compare to laparoscopic fundoplication; new endoscopic procedures being studied to treat refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); the new Stretta; the relationship between obesity and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) resistance; data concerning acid hypersensitivity and sensory receptors (vallinoid, TRPV1) causing refractory GERD; whether microscopic esophagitis is relevant in determining symptoms of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD); how concomitant functional gastrointestinal disorders affect the PPI response in NERD; the evidence that a functional esophagus is associated with inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS); the role of GABA agonists in the treatment of refractory GERD; the role of biofeedback and antidepressants in refractory GERD; and endoluminal fundoplication using the EsophyX device.
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Innovative techniques in evaluating the esophagus; imaging of esophageal morphology and function; and drugs for esophageal disease.
Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2013
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This paper reporting on techniques for esophageal evaluation and imaging and drugs for esophageal disease includes commentaries on endoscopy techniques including dye-based high-resolution and dye-less high-definition endoscopy; the shift from CT to MRI guidance in tumor delineation for radiation therapy; the role of functional lumen imaging in measuring esophageal distensibility; electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) as an alternative to fundoduplication for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); the morphological findings of reflux esophagitis and esophageal dysmotility on double-contrast esophagography; the value of videofluoroscopy in assessing protecting mechanisms in patients with chronic reflux or swallowing disorders; targeting visceral hypersensitivity in the treatment of refractory GERD; and the symptoms and treatments of nighttime reflux and nocturnal acid breakthrough (NAB).
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Adalimumab is more effective than azathioprine and mesalamine at preventing postoperative recurrence of Crohns disease: a randomized controlled trial.
Am. J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2013
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Postsurgical recurrence of Crohns disease (CD) is very frequent and, to date, only infliximab has been shown to be useful in preventing it. The efficacy of adalimumab (ADA) is poorly known. We evaluated whether the administration of ADA after resective intestinal surgery reduces postoperative CD recurrence.
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A comparison between lactose breath test and quick test on duodenal biopsies for diagnosing lactase deficiency in patients with self-reported lactose intolerance.
J. Clin. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 07-03-2013
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A lactose breath test (LBT) is usually used to diagnose lactase deficiency, and a lactose quick test (LQT) has been proposed as a new test on duodenal biopsies to detect this disorder.
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The pharmacokinetics of ilaprazole for gastro-esophageal reflux treatment.
Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol
PUBLISHED: 06-27-2013
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Approximately 20% of the Western population is affected by gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). To date, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent the mainstay of GERD medical treatment. However, despite their undoubted benefit, about 40% of GERD patients display an inadequate response to these drugs. Recently, a new PPI, ilaprazole , at oral doses of 10 mg has shown higher suppression of gastric acid secretion, more prolonged plasma half-life, and similar safety compared to 20 mg omeprazole.
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NERD: an umbrella term including heterogeneous subpopulations.
Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2013
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Nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) represents the more common phenotypic presentation of GERD and comprises patients who have typical symptoms without any mucosal breaks at endoscopy. However, these patients are markedly heterogeneous from a pathophysiological point of view and should be correctly classified by means of 24 h impedance-pH testing, which enables detection of both acidic and weakly acidic reflux and correlation with symptoms. This technique is able to identify two subsets of NERD (that is, patients with an excess of acid or with a hypersensitive oesophagus to both acid and weakly acidic reflux) and patients with functional heartburn (who do not have any kind of reflux underlying their symptoms and must be excluded from the realm of GERD). The mechanisms of symptom generation are not clear in patients with NERD, but the presence of microscopic oesophagitis, including the dilation of intercellular spaces, seems to have a relevant role. Patients with NERD in whom acid is the main pathogenetic factor respond successfully to PPI therapy, while those with hypersensitive oesophagus to weakly acidic reflux need to be treated with reflux inhibitors or surgery, although the experience in this field is very scant. Patients with functional heartburn should undergo therapy with pain modulators, but large placebo-controlled trials are necessary.
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Noninfectious interstitial lung disease during infliximab therapy: case report and literature review.
World J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2013
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Pulmonary abnormalities are not frequently encountered in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. However, lung toxicity can be induced by conventional medications used to maintain remission, and similar evidence is also emerging for biologics. We present the case of a young woman affected by colonic Crohns disease who was treated with oral mesalamine and became steroid-dependent and refractory to azathioprine and adalimumab. She was referred to our clinic with a severe relapse and was treated with infliximab, an anti-tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?) antibody, to induce remission. After an initial benefit, with decreases in bowel movements, rectal bleeding and C-reactive protein levels, she experienced shortness of breath after the 5(th) infusion. Noninfectious interstitial lung disease was diagnosed. Both mesalamine and infliximab were discontinued, and steroids were introduced with slow but progressive improvement of symptoms, radiology and functional tests. This represents a rare case of interstitial lung disease associated with infliximab therapy and the effect of drug withdrawal on these lung alterations. Given the increasing use of anti-TNF-? therapies and the increasing reports of pulmonary abnormalities in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, this case underlines the importance of a careful evaluation of respiratory symptoms in patients undergoing infliximab therapy.
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Gastro-oesophageal reflux and gastric aspiration in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients.
Eur. Respir. J.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2013
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The aim of the study was to characterise gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). 40 consecutive IPF patients underwent pulmonary high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan and impedance-pH monitoring while off antisecretory therapy. The presence of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed using validated HRCT scores. Reflux features included distal oesophageal acid exposure, number of acid/weakly acidic reflux episodes and their proximal migration. 40 consecutive patients with interstitial lung disease other than IPF (non-IPF patients) and 50 healthy volunteers were also enrolled. IPF patients had significantly higher (p<0.01) oesophageal acid exposure (median (interquartile range (IQR)) 9.25 (4.7-15.4)% versus 3.3 (1.4-7.4)% versus 0.7 (0.2-4.2)%, number of acid (median (IQR) 45 (23-55) versus 32 (19-44) versus 18 (10-31)), weakly acidic (median (IQR) 34 (19-43) versus 21 (11-33) versus 18 (15-28)) and proximal reflux (median (IQR) 51 (26.5-65.5) versus 20 (9.5-34.5) versus 9 (5-20)) events compared to non-IPF patients and healthy volunteers, respectively. Pulmonary fibrosis HRCT scores correlated well with reflux episodes in both the distal (r(2)=0.567) and proximal (r(2)=0.6323) oesophagus. Patients with IPF had more bile acids and pepsin (p<0.03) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) (62% and 67%, respectively) and saliva (61% and 68%, respectively) than non-IPF patients (25% and 25% in BALF, and 33% and 36%, respectively, in saliva) and controls (0% and 0% in BALF and saliva, respectively). Acid GOR is common in IPF, but weakly acidic GOR may also occur. Patients with IPF had a risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. Outcome studies with intense antireflux therapy are needed.
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Ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy of extra-ocular orbital lesions.
Eur Radiol
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2013
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To evaluate the diagnostic yield of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy of extra-ocular orbital lesions.
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Narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy is accurate for detecting gastric intestinal metaplasia.
World J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2013
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To investigate the predictive value of narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy (NBI-ME) for identifying gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) in unselected patients.
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Gastrointestinal motility disorder assessment in systemic sclerosis.
Rheumatology (Oxford)
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2013
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SSc is a clinically heterogeneous and generalized disease, characterized by thickness of the connective tissue of the skin and internal organs, such as the digestive tract, impairing gastrointestinal (GI) motility. Our aim is to evaluate retrospectively abnormalities of oesophageal motility, gastric emptying, oro-cecal transit time (OCTT) and small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in a large cohort of SSc patients.
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Lactulose breath test to assess oro-cecal transit delay and estimate esophageal dysmotility in scleroderma patients.
Semin. Arthritis Rheum.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2013
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To assess the correlation between delayed oro-cecal transit time (OCTT) and esophageal motility abnormalities in a cohort of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients.
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Eosinophilic oesophagitis: from physiopathology to treatment.
Dig Liver Dis
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2013
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Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the oesophageal mucosa. Food and aero-allergens are involved in its pathogenesis. Dysphagia and food impaction are the dominant symptoms in adult with eosinophilic oesophagitis. However, a wide range of symptoms has been noticed such as chest pain or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease-like symptoms. Upper gastro-intestinal endoscopy and oesophageal biopsies are crucial for the diagnosis of eosinophilic oesophagitis. Endoscopy might be normal or reveal typical patterns such as rings, furrows, exudates, oedema, and stricture. Two to four biopsies should be performed both in the distal and in the proximal oesophagus, and 15 eosinophils per high power field within the oesophageal epithelium are the minimal threshold to diagnose eosinophilic oesophagitis. Allergy testing is recommended, although its impact to orient treatment remains to be demonstrated. Eosinophilic oesophagitis treatment includes medical treatment, diet and endoscopic dilation. Proton pump inhibitors are the first-line therapy as some eosinophilic oesophagitis phenotypes respond well to proton pump inhibitors. Topical viscous corticosteroids or diet elimination are the treatment of choice. There is no clear evidence in the literature to prefer one to the other. Finally endoscopic dilation should be considered in case of persistent symptomatic stenosis despite medical therapy.
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Barretts esophagus: surgical treatments.
Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2011
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The following on surgical treatments for Barretts esophagus includes commentaries on the indications for antireflux surgery after medical treatment; the effects of the various procedures on the lower esophageal sphincter; the role of impaired esophageal motility and delayed gastric emptying in the choice of the surgical procedure; indications for associated highly selective vagotomy, duodenal switch, and gastric electrical stimulation; therapeutic strategies for detection and treatment of shortened esophagus; the role of antireflux surgery on the regression of metaplastic mucosa and the risk of malignant progression; the detection of asymptomatic reflux brfore bariatric surgery; the role of non-GERD symptoms on the results of surgery; and the indications of Collis gastroplasty and choice of the type of fundoplication.
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Barretts esophagus: proton pump inhibitors and chemoprevention II.
Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2011
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The following on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and chemoprevention in relation to Barretts esophagus includes commentaries on 48-h pH monitoring, pH-impedence, bile acid testing, dyspepsia, long/short segment Barretts esophagus, nonerosive reflux disease (NERD), functional heartburn, dual-release delivery PPIs, immediate-release PPIs, long-term PPI use, prokinetic agents, obesity, baclofen, nocturnal acid breakthrough, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and new PPIs.
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Impedance-pH reflux patterns can differentiate non-erosive reflux disease from functional heartburn patients.
J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2011
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Symptom association is important to distinguish non-erosive reflux disease [NERD; abnormal oesophageal acid exposure time (AET) and/or positive symptom association] from functional heartburn (FH; normal AET and negative symptom association). Asymptomatic patients during reflux monitoring are challenging as symptom association cannot be assessed.
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Ultrasound assessment of the rotator cuff cable: comparison between young and elderly asymptomatic volunteers and interobserver reproducibility.
Ultrasound Med Biol
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2011
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Our aim was to characterize rotator cable ultrasound appearance in shoulders of different-aged asymptomatic volunteers, also estimating interobserver reproducibility. We studied 83 shoulders in 42 young volunteers (mean age 26 ± 7.0 years, range 21-35 years) and 66 shoulders in 36 elderly volunteers (65-81 years, 73 ± 4.9 years), noting rotator cable visibility and its minimum thickness and width. Interobserver reproducibility was tested in elderly volunteers by two blinded observers. ?(2), U Mann-Whitney, t-test, Bland-Altman, and ? statistics were used. Rotator cable was less frequently detected in younger than elderly volunteers (25/83 vs. 36/66 shoulders; p = 0.002). Young subjects had thicker (1.5 ± 0.2 mm, range 1.3-1.8 mm vs. 1.1 ± 0.1 mm, 0.9-1.3 mm; p < 0.001) and wider rotator cable (5.8 ± 0.7 mm, 4.5-7.1 mm vs. 4.0 ± 1.2 mm, 2.5-7.1 mm; p < 0.001) than elderly volunteers. Thickness and width reproducibility index were 89% and 94%, respectively; ? = 0.87. Ultrasound demonstrated different rotator cable consistency in younger and elderly asymptomatic patients, with high interobserver reproducibility.
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Achalasia with dense eosinophilic infiltrate responds to steroid therapy.
Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2011
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A patient presented with chronic substernal discomfort and intermittent dysphagia for solids. High-resolution impedance manometry (HRIM) of the esophagus showed that there was no peristalsis in the esophageal body but incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and incomplete bolus transit, so the patient was diagnosed with achalasia. Moreover, probably because of esophageal stasis, eosinophilic infiltration that mimicked a pattern of eosinophilic esophagitis was observed, on the basis of multiple biopsies of the esophagus. The patient was given 50 mg prednisolone once daily; the symptoms improved dramatically, and HRIM showed complete recovery of esophageal peristalsis, deeper relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter, and complete bolus transit profile. HRIM can therefore be used to assess dysmotility abnormalities in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic-like esophagitis, and steroids relieve these symptoms. Treatment with a high dose of prednisolone resulted in a complete disappearance of dysphagia because of improved esophageal motility and reduced eosinophilic infiltrate. It is therefore important to control the inflammatory process in patients with idiopathic achalasia, which is likely to result from an autoimmune reaction.
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Overweight is a risk factor for both erosive and non-erosive reflux disease.
Dig Liver Dis
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2011
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Studies have reported that the association between overweight and erosive oesophagitis is very strong, whilst seeming less consistent with non-erosive reflux disease.
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The added value of impedance-pH monitoring to Rome III criteria in distinguishing functional heartburn from non-erosive reflux disease.
Dig Liver Dis
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2011
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Functional heartburn is defined by Rome III criteria as an endoscopy-negative condition with normal oesophageal acid exposure time, negative symptom association to acid reflux and unsatisfactory response to proton pump inhibitors. These criteria underestimated the role of non-acid reflux.
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Ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of triamcinolone acetonide for treating capsular contracture in patients with augmented and reconstructed breast.
Eur Radiol
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2010
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To evaluate ultrasound (US)-guided treatment of capsular contracture (CC) in patients with reconstructed/augmented breast.
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Characteristics of reflux episodes and symptom association in patients with erosive esophagitis and nonerosive reflux disease: study using combined impedance-pH off therapy.
Am. J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 12-08-2009
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We sought to compare reflux and symptom association patterns in patients with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD), erosive esophagitis (EE), and in healthy volunteers (HVs).
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[Possible connection between gastroesophageal reflux and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis in patients with systemic sclerosis].
Recenti Prog Med
PUBLISHED: 11-27-2009
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Interstitial lung disease represents the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic sclerosis. The mechanisms leading to interstitial lung disease are poorly understood and thus current strategies have little effect on this progressive and fatal disease. Therefore, it appears relevant the importance to assess the possible risk factors involved in its pathogenesis. Previous studies in vivo and in vitro suggested that pulmonary fibrosis can occur after repeated aspiration of small amounts of gastric contents over long periods of time. Recently, our group observed that patients with systemic sclerosis and pulmonary fibrosis have a more severe degree of gastroesophageal reflux with a greater number of reflux events and a higher percentage of reflux episodes reaching the proximal esophagus, causing an increasing risk of microaspiration, compared to patients with systemic sclerosis without lung involvement. Further larger controlled studies are necessary to evaluate whether or not the development of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis patients can be prevented by treating gastroesophageal reflux.
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Positive glucose breath testing is more prevalent in patients with IBS-like symptoms compared with controls of similar age and gender distribution.
J. Clin. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2009
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Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may mimic a functional disorder such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or functional bloating (FB). In this study, we aimed to assess the utility of glucose breath test (GBT) in patients with the above conditions.
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Gastroesophageal reflux and pulmonary fibrosis in scleroderma: a study using pH-impedance monitoring.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2009
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Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is considered a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of ILD.
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Microscopic esophagitis distinguishes patients with non-erosive reflux disease from those with functional heartburn.
J. Gastroenterol.
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Microscopic esophagitis (ME) is common in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and dilation of intercellular spaces (DIS) has been regarded as the potential main mechanism of symptom generation. We aimed to compare these histological abnormalities in healthy volunteers (HVs) and patients with erosive esophagitis (EE), NERD, and functional heartburn (FH).
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Alginate controls heartburn in patients with erosive and nonerosive reflux disease.
World J. Gastroenterol.
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To evaluate the effect of a novel alginate-based compound, Faringel, in modifying reflux characteristics and controlling symptoms.
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How many cases of laryngopharyngeal reflux suspected by laryngoscopy are gastroesophageal reflux disease-related?
World J. Gastroenterol.
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To investigate the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients with a laryngoscopic diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR).
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Reassessment of the role of methane production between irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation.
J Gastrointestin Liver Dis
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Modifications of intestinal gas due to changes in microbiota may produce different symptoms. Our aim was to assess whether different patterns of hydrogen (H?) and methane (CH?) excretion were related to some intestinal disturbances.
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Functional aspects of distal oesophageal spasm: the role of onset velocity and contraction amplitude on bolus transit.
Dig Liver Dis
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Distal oesophageal spasm is a rare and under-investigated motility abnormality. Recent studies indicate effective bolus transit in varying percentages of distal oesophageal spasm patients.
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Prevention of postoperative recurrence of Crohns disease by Adalimumab: a case series.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol
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Adalimumab, an anti-TNF-? monoclonal antibody, was found to be effective for the treatment of luminal Crohns disease (CD), but its efficacy for the prevention of postoperative recurrence of CD is still unknown. Here, we present a case series of six patients who underwent resection for an ileocecal stricture caused by CD. Surgery removed the involved ileocolon, and pathology confirmed the presence of a fibrotic stricture. Two weeks after the operation, they were given Adalimumab at the dose of 160/80/40 mg every 2 weeks and were followed up. Since then, they have been disease-free for ? 3 years after surgery on clinical, radiological, and endoscopic/histological grounds (Crohns Disease Activity Index ? 110 in all occasions). Up to now, they have had no anemia, no increase in inflammatory indices, and no abnormal blood tests. These are the first cases, to our knowledge, in which Adalimumab has been successfully used to prevent the postsurgical recurrence of CD, an event so far considered to be mandatory. Further large placebo-controlled studies are necessary to show the therapeutic advantage and the economic implications of these observations.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.