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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Comparison of a Closed System to a Standard Open Technique for Preparing Tissue-Engineered Vascular Grafts.
Tissue Eng Part C Methods
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2014
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We developed a prototype for a closed apparatus for assembling tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) with the goal of creating a simple operator-independent method for making TEVGs to optimize safety and enable widespread application of this technology. The TEVG is made by seeding autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells onto a biodegradable tubular scaffold and is the first man-made vascular graft to be successfully used in humans. A critical barrier, which has prevented the widespread clinical adoption of the TEVG, is that cell isolation, scaffold seeding, and incubation are performed using an open method. To reduce the risk of contamination, the TEVG is assembled in a clean room. Clean rooms are expensive to build, complex to operate, and are not available in most hospitals. In this investigation, we used an ovine model to compare the safety and efficacy of TEVGs created using either a standard density centrifugation-based open method or the new filter-based closed system. We demonstrated no graft-related complications and maintenance of growth capacity in TEVGs created using the closed apparatus. In addition, the use of the closed system reduced the amount of time needed to assemble the TEVG by ?50%. Adaptation of similar methodologies may facilitate the safe translation and the widespread use of other tissue engineering technologies.
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Challenges and potential solutions for recruitment and retention of hematopoietic cell transplantation physicians: the National Marrow Donor Program's System Capacity Initiative Physician Workforce Group report.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2014
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Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) remains the only known curative therapy for many patients with hematologic, metabolic, and immunologic disorders. Furthermore, the use of HCT has increased with the emergence of HCT as a viable therapeutic option for older patients, those with significant comorbidities, and, with the demonstrated clinical effectiveness of alternative allogeneic donor sources, for those patients without a suitable sibling donor. The National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) estimates that by 2020, it will facilitate 10,000 transplantations per year, double the number in 2010. To understand the needs of the HCT infrastructure to facilitate this number of transplantations, the NMDP organized the System Capacity Initiative 2020, centered on 6 working groups representing a diverse group of stakeholders. The Physician Workforce Group was tasked with addressing issues relating to recruitment and retention of transplantation physicians. We report here the results of our efforts and future initiatives.
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Exposure of early pediatric trainees to blood and marrow transplantation leads to higher recruitment to the field.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2013
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The National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) projects the need for allogeneic unrelated blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) in the United States as 10,000 per year. Although the NMDP is preparing to facilitate that number by the year 2015, there are several barriers to meeting this goal, including the need to recruit more health care personnel, including BMT physicians. To learn how best to recruit BMT physicians, we examined why practicing BMT physicians chose to enter the field and why others did not. We conducted a Web-based survey among pediatric hematology/oncology (PHO) and BMT physician providers and trainees to identify the factors influencing their decision to choose or not choose a career in BMT. Out of 259 respondents (48% male, 74% of Caucasian origin), 94 self-identified as BMT physicians, 112 as PHO physicians, and 53 as PHO trainees. The PHO and BMT providers spent an average of 53% of their time in clinical activities. More than two-thirds of PHO providers reported providing BMT services at their institutions, most commonly for inpatient coverage (73%). The proportion of providers exposed to BMT early in training was significantly higher among BMT providers compared with PHO providers (51% versus 18% in medical school [P < .0001]; 70% versus 50% during residency [P < .005]). Exposure during fellowship (94%) did not differ between the 2 groups. The decision to pursue a career in BMT was made before fellowship (medical school or residency) by 50% of the respondents. A lower proportion of BMT providers than PHO providers reported current involvement in the education of medical students and residents (76% versus 98%; P < .0001). Of the 53 trainees who responded, 64% reported not contemplating a career in BMT. Of these, 68% identified inadequate exposure to BMT before PHO fellowship as the reason behind this decision. Only 26% reported receiving exposure to the BMT field while in medical school, and 43% reported exposure during residency. The 2 most common reasons cited for choosing a career as a BMT physician were the degree of intellectual and scientific challenge (89%) and the influence of role models/mentors in the field (67%). The results of this survey suggest that early exposure to BMT during medical school and residency is associated with increased interest in pursuing a career in BMT. BMT physicians and training program directors can foster interest in the field by promoting BMT-focused education and clinical inpatient and outpatient rotations during medical school and residency. This early exposure to BMT may aid recruitment of future transplantation providers.
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Optimizing Autologous Stem Cell Mobilization Strategies to Improve Patient Outcomes: Consensus Guidelines and Recommendations.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2013
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Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) is a well-established treatment for malignancies such as multiple myeloma (MM) and lymphomas. Various changes in the field over the past decade, including the frequent use of tandem aHSCT in MM, the advent of novel therapies for the treatment of MM and lymphoma, and the addition of new stem cell mobilization techniques, have led to the need to reassess current stem cell mobilization strategies. Mobilization failures with traditional strategies are common and result in delays in treatment and increased cost and resource utilization. Recently, plerixafor-containing strategies have been shown to significantly reduce mobilization failure rates, but the ideal method to maximize stem cell yields and minimize costs associated with collection has not yet been determined. A panel of experts convened to discuss the currently available data on autologous hematopoietic stem cell mobilization and transplantation and to devise guidelines to optimize mobilization strategies. Herein is a summary of their discussion and consensus.
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A multicenter evaluation of a new therapeutic plasma exchange procedure.
Transfusion
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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The AMICUS (Fenwal, Inc.) was cleared in the United States for platelet (PLT) and plasma collection in 1996 with subsequent clearances for the collection of other blood products. Although not previously used for therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), new disposables, software, and hardware were developed to enable TPE on the AMICUS.
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The National Marrow Donor Programs Symposium on Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in 2020: a health care resource and infrastructure assessment.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2011
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Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only known curative therapy for many patients with life-threatening hematologic and oncologic diseases. It is estimated that the National Marrow Donor Program(®) (NMDP) will facilitate 10,000 transplants by 2015, double the current number. To better understand the existing personnel and center infrastructure for HCT in the country and to address system capacity challenges to the future growth of HCT, the NMDP convened a diverse group of stakeholders and thought leaders representing HCT physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, pharmacists, other healthcare providers, HCT program directors, hospital administrators, payors, and professional organizations. Working groups were formed to identify: capacity issues because of shortages in human resources, structural constraints, and patient access barriers including diversity and healthcare disparity challenges; recommendations to address challenges; and stakeholders to engage. This report details the deliberations and recommendations of a national symposium, "Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in 2020: A Health Care Resource and Infrastructure Assessment," held in September 2010.
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The rise of cellular therapy.
Transfus. Apher. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2011
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In 1938, the field of Transfusion Medicine began as the simpler entity - Blood Banking. It was a discipline that focused on collecting, processing, storing and distributing end stage blood cells, plasma and plasma fractions to patients. Over the years, the field progressed to include clinical patient services such as apheresis technology and with the development of stem cell transplantation as a standard of care, Cell Therapy. Now the discipline is also finding a niche in the area of Regenerative Medicine. The role played by Transfusion Medicine practitioners in Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine was predicated on many factors: (1) pre-existing, established protocols for therapeutic leukapheresis, (2) prior experience with mononuclear cell collection and processing, (3) long term familiarity with, and a clear understanding of, cGMP and cGLP guidelines, Federal regulations, and the voluntary standards established by various organizations, (4) close relationships with practitioners in clinical departments of medicine, pediatrics, oncology, surgery, and their subspecialty areas. While the initial Cell Therapy programs related primarily to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, as Regenerative Medicine programs developed, transfusion specialists found it to be a related field that would also benefit from their input. Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, now provide fertile soil for the seeds of Transfusion Medicine to grow. The once narrowly defined field of Blood Banking now encompasses involvement in major new Cellular Therapy/Regenerative Medicine research protocols related to treatment of patients with cancer as well as renal, hepatic and cardiac illnesses. This in turn provides opportunities for residents and fellows to consider robust careers in the field of Transfusion Medicine. In this manner we will move forward with one eye on the past and another on the promising future.
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Comparison of human bone marrow mononuclear cell isolation methods for creating tissue-engineered vascular grafts: novel filter system versus traditional density centrifugation method.
Tissue Eng Part C Methods
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2011
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We created the first tissue-engineered vascular graft (TEVG) to be successfully used in humans. The TEVG is made by seeding autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) onto a biodegradable tubular scaffold fabricated from polyglycolic-acid mesh coated with a 50:50 copolymer of poly-L-lactide and-?-caprolactone. In the initial clinical study, the BM-MNCs were isolated using a Ficoll density centrifugation method. Use of this cell isolation technique is problematic in that it is performed using an open system and therefore is susceptible to contamination. As a first step toward creating a closed system for assembling a TEVG, we evaluated the use of a filter-based method for isolating BM-MNCs and compared it to density centrifugation in Ficoll.
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Late afternoon dosing of plerixafor for stem cell mobilization: a practical solution.
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2011
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Plerixafor was recently approved for stem cell mobilization in patients who have non-Hodgkin lymphoma or multiple myeloma. However, the use of late evening (10 PM) injections is inconvenient for patients and requires an after-hours infrastructure that may not be readily available.
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In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a whole blood platelet-sparing leukoreduction filtration system.
Transfusion
PUBLISHED: 10-04-2010
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In-line leukoreduction (LR) filters decrease adverse clinical sequelae caused by residual white blood cells (WBCs). Such filtration, however, can remove platelets (PLTs) needed for production of PLT concentrates (PCs). This study measured in vitro and in vivo efficacy of a new whole blood PLT-sparing LR filter (WBPSF) system that performs whole blood (WB) LR using a single closed-system filtration step. The WBPSF provides three final LR products: AS-5 red blood cells (RBCs), citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD) PLTs, and CPD plasma.
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In vitro and in vivo evaluation of apheresis platelets stored for 5 days in 65% platelet additive solution/35% plasma.
Transfusion
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2010
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In the United States, apheresis platelets (PLTs) are suspended in autologous plasma. PLT additive solutions, long used in Europe, decrease recipient allergic reactions and may reduce the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury. We evaluated Amicus-collected PLTs stored in platelet additive solution (PAS) III (InterSol) for 5 days.
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Tissue-engineered vascular grafts transform into mature blood vessels via an inflammation-mediated process of vascular remodeling.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2010
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Biodegradable scaffolds seeded with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are the earliest tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) to be used clinically. These TEVGs transform into living blood vessels in vivo, with an endothelial cell (EC) lining invested by smooth muscle cells (SMCs); however, the process by which this occurs is unclear. To test if the seeded BMCs differentiate into the mature vascular cells of the neovessel, we implanted an immunodeficient mouse recipient with human BMC (hBMC)-seeded scaffolds. As in humans, TEVGs implanted in a mouse host as venous interposition grafts gradually transformed into living blood vessels over a 6-month time course. Seeded hBMCs, however, were no longer detectable within a few days of implantation. Instead, scaffolds were initially repopulated by mouse monocytes and subsequently repopulated by mouse SMCs and ECs. Seeded BMCs secreted significant amounts of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and increased early monocyte recruitment. These findings suggest TEVGs transform into functional neovessels via an inflammatory process of vascular remodeling.
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Improved plasma removal efficiency for therapeutic plasma exchange using a new apheresis platform.
Transfusion
PUBLISHED: 10-05-2009
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The Spectra Optia (SPO; CaridianBCT) is a new apheresis device based on the COBE Spectra (CSP; CaridianBCT) platform. This study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficiency of the SPO in comparison to the predicate CSP device.
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Clinical trials for pathogen reduction in transfusion medicine: a review.
Transfus. Apher. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2009
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Despite the implementation of highly sensitive methods for the detection of pathogens in donor blood products, the risk of transmission of infectious disease to transfusion recipients remains. Of greatest concern, and accounting for most of the risk, are newly-emerging pathogens for which screening assays do not yet exist or well-known pathogens for which testing regimens are not routinely employed. Furthermore, passive donor screening programs are unlikely to capture all potentially infective donors. A promising strategy to overcome these limitations is the proactive incapacitation of pathogens residing in donor units. Several unique pathogen reduction/inactivation (PR/PI) platforms have been developed and implemented in clinical settings. The aims of this article are to review: (1) the basic methodology underlying PR/PI platforms, (2) the potential toxicities associated with PR/PI treatment of blood products, and (3) the data and outcomes from clinical trials involving currently available PR/PI platforms.
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Analysis of transfusion reactions associated with prestorage-pooled platelet components.
Transfusion
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2009
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The goal of this study was to assess transfusion reactions arising from prestorage-pooled platelet (PSPP) infusions compared with apheresis single-donor platelets (SDPs) and poststorage-pooled, whole blood-derived random-donor platelets (RDPs).
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Development of a humanized mouse model to study the role of macrophages in allograft injury.
Transplantation
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2009
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Nearly half of all infiltrating leukocytes in rejecting human allografts are macrophages, yet, in comparison with T cells, much less is known about the contribution of this cell type to rejection. Our laboratory has previously described models of rejection of human skin or artery grafts in immunodeficient mouse hosts mediated by adoptively transferred allogeneic T cells. However, mature human monocyte/macrophages have consistently failed to engraft in these animals. Here, we describe the introduction of human CD68+ macrophages into irradiated immunodeficient mice by transplantation of enriched CD34+ hematopoietic stem-cells isolated from peripheral blood of G-colony-stimulating factor pretreated adults.
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Hematopoietic cell transplantation in 2020: summary of year 2 recommendations of the National Marrow Donor Programs System Capacity Initiative.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
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The National Marrow Donor Program, in partnership with the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, sponsored and organized a series of symposia to identify complex issues affecting the delivery of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and to collaboratively develop options for solutions. "Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in 2020: A System Capacity Initiative" used a deliberative process model to engage professional organizations, experts, transplant centers, and stakeholders in a national collaborative effort. Year 2 efforts emphasized data analysis and identification of innovative ideas to increase HCT system efficiency, address future capacity requirements, and ensure adequate reimbursement for HCT programs to meet the projected need for HCT. This report highlights the deliberations and recommendations of Year 2 and the associated symposium held in September 2011.
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Successful collection and engraftment of autologous peripheral blood progenitor cells in poorly mobilized patients receiving high-dose granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.
J Clin Apher
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Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) alone or in conjunction with chemotherapy is commonly used to mobilize hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) into peripheral blood for progenitor cell harvest for autologous HPC transplantation. However, in up to 30% of patients, HPC are not effectively mobilized. In this study, we report the efficacy and safety profiles of a mobilization strategy using high-dose (up to 36 ?g/kg) G-CSF in poorly mobilized patients.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.