JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A Study of Possible Associations Between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Estrogen Receptor 2 Gene and Female Sexual Desire.
J Sex Med
PUBLISHED: 11-12-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Female sexual desire and arousal problems have been shown to have a heritable component of moderate size. Previous molecular genetic studies on sexual desire have mainly focused on genes associated with neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. Nevertheless, there is reason to believe that hormones with more specific functions concerning sexuality could have an impact on sexual desire and arousal.
Related JoVE Video
Application of the Gradient Boosted method in randomised clinical trials: Participant variables that contribute to depression treatment efficacy of duloxetine, SSRIs or placebo.
J Affect Disord
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Randomised, placebo-controlled trials of treatments for depression typically collect outcomes data but traditionally only analyse data to demonstrate efficacy and safety. Additional post-hoc statistical techniques may reveal important insights about treatment variables useful when considering inter-individual differences amongst depressed patients. This paper aims to examine the Gradient Boosted Model (GBM), a statistical technique that uses regression tree analyses and can be applied to clinical trial data to identify and measure variables that may influence treatment outcomes.
Related JoVE Video
Baseline patient characteristics associated with placebo remission and their impact on remission with duloxetine and selected SSRI antidepressants.
Curr Med Res Opin
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We examined whether identification of patients with placebo-remitter characteristics and placebo-nonremitter characteristics enhances the ability to identify drug-placebo treatment differences and, perhaps, differences between agents in major depressive disorder (MDD). We hypothesized: 1) that drug-placebo differences in remission rates would be greater for both duloxetine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) among placebo nonremitters than placebo remitters and: 2) that the difference between active treatments would also be greater in placebo nonremitters than placebo remitters.
Related JoVE Video
Serotonin depletion counteracts sex differences in anxiety-related behaviour in rat.
Psychopharmacology (Berl.)
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Numerous studies suggest (1) that a major physiological role of brain serotonin-containing neurons is to modulate sex steroid-driven behaviour such as sex and aggression, (2) that sex steroids influence brain serotonergic neurotransmission and (3) that brain serotonergic neurotransmission displays sexual dimorphism. Such observations indicate that an important task for brain serotonin is to either enhance or counteract sex differences in behaviour.
Related JoVE Video
Genetic polymorphisms in monoamine systems and outcome of cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The role of genetics for predicting the response to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) has only been studied in one previous investigation. The serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR), the catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) val158met, and the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2) G-703Tpolymorphisms are implicated in the regulation of amygdala reactivity and fear extinction and therefore might be of relevance for CBT outcome. The aim of the present study was to investigate if these three gene variants predicted response to CBT in a large sample of SAD patients.
Related JoVE Video
KIBRA polymorphism is related to enhanced memory and elevated hippocampal processing.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Several studies have linked the KIBRA rs17070145 T polymorphism to superior episodic memory in healthy humans. One study investigated the effect of KIBRA on brain activation patterns (Papassotiropoulos et al., 2006) and observed increased hippocampal activation in noncarriers of the T allele during retrieval. Noncarriers were interpreted to need more hippocampal activation to reach the same performance level as T carriers. Using large behavioral (N = 2230) and fMRI (N = 83) samples, we replicated the KIBRA effect on episodic memory performance, but found increased hippocampal activation in T carriers during episodic retrieval. There was no evidence of compensatory brain activation in noncarriers within the hippocampal region. In the main fMRI sample, T carriers performed better than noncarriers during scanning but, importantly, the difference in hippocampus activation remained after post hoc matching according to performance, sex, and age (N = 64). These findings link enhanced memory performance in KIBRA T allele carriers to elevated hippocampal functioning, rather than to neural compensation in noncarriers.
Related JoVE Video
Ovarian morphology in premenstrual dysphoria.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Ovarian cyclicity is a prerequisite for premenstrual dysphoria (PMD), as illustrated by the fact that this condition is effectively eliminated by ovariectomy or by treatment with a GnRH agonist. Despite the possibility of differences in ovarian function between women with and without PMD, no study comparing ovarian morphology in these two groups has ever been published. Fifty-two women were recruited for this study; 26 had premenstrual dysphoria, fulfilling criteria slightly modified from those of the premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and 26 were asymptomatic age-matched controls. Ovarian morphology was assessed using transvaginal 7 MHz ultrasonography on day 5 after the start of menses, and venous blood was sampled for hormone analysis on days 3 and 8, the expected day of ovulation, and day -4 of the menstrual cycle. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to the prevalence of polycystic ovaries (PCO), the total number of follicles, the total ovarian volume or serum levels of androgen hormones. In addition, serum free testosterone levels in late premenstrual phase showed an inverse association to premenstrual symptoms of irritability and a similar inverse association trend to symptoms of depressed mood. Unexpectedly, the prevalence of ovaries with fewer than five antral or growing follicles was significantly higher in women with PMD than in controls (p=0.016). While the results do not support a role for PCO or androgen hormones in eliciting late luteal phase irritability, the possible relationship between oligofollicular ovaries and PMD deserves further study.
Related JoVE Video
Panic disorder is associated with the Val308Iso polymorphism in the hypocretin receptor gene.
Psychiatr. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Orexin A and B are neuropeptides influencing, for example, arousal and respiration. Although panic disorder is characterized by both enhanced proneness for arousal and by respiratory abnormalities, the possible influence of orexin-related genes on the risk of developing this disorder has not been studied until now.
Related JoVE Video
Study on the possible association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor polymorphism with the developmental course of symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity.
Int. J. Neuropsychopharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Several studies have, with conflicting results, investigated the relationship between the Val??Met polymorphism in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We assessed longitudinal, quantitative phenotypes of hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention in order to determine whether the Val??Met polymorphism is associated with age-specific and/or persistent symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity and/or inattention in a community-based cohort of 1236 Swedish individuals for which ADHD symptom data were collected when the participants were aged 8-9, 13-14 and 16-17 yr. The Met allele was associated with symptoms of ADHD at ages 8-9 and 13-14 yr. A multivariate regression analysis revealed that the observed effect of the Met allele on ADHD symptoms reflects an influence on persistent hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms. The present findings support the hypothesis that BDNF is involved in the pathogenesis of ADHD. The results highlight the importance of distinguishing between hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention, respectively, and demonstrate the value of using a longitudinal approach in genetic studies of ADHD symptoms.
Related JoVE Video
Preliminary evidence that allelic variation in the LMX1A gene influences training-related working memory improvement.
Neuropsychologia
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
LMX1A is a transcription factor involved in the development of dopamine (DA)-producing neurons in midbrain. Previous research has shown that allelic variations in three LMX1A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were related to risk of Parkinsons disease (PD), suggesting that these SNPs may influence the number of mesencephalic DA neurons. Prompted by the established link between striatal DA functions and working memory (WM) performance, we examined two of these SNPs in relation to the ability to benefit from 4 weeks of WM training. One SNP (rs4657412) was strongly associated with the magnitude of training-related gains in verbal WM. The allele linked to larger gains has previously been suggested to be associated with higher dopaminergic nerve cell density. No differential gains of either SNP were observed for spatial WM, and the genotype groups were also indistinguishable in tests of attention, interference control, episodic memory, perceptual speed, and reasoning for both SNPs. This pattern of data is in agreement with previous findings from our group, suggesting that cognitive effects of DA-related genes may be more easily detected in a training context than for single-assessment performance scores.
Related JoVE Video
Preliminary evidence that polymorphisms in dopamine-related transcription factors LMX1A, LMX1B and PITX3 are associated with schizophrenia.
Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The early development of dopaminergic pathways has been attributed importance for the aetiology of schizophrenia. Several transcription factors are involved in the survival and maturation of dopamine neurons, including LMX1A, LMX1B and PITX3. The possibility that polymorphisms in these genes may influence the development and/or the maintenance of dopaminergic neurons prompted us to investigate if five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously linked to Parkinsons disease are associated with this disorder. Preliminary evidence that genetic variation in LMX1A (rs6668493, rs4657411), LMX1B (rs10987386) and PITX3 (rs4919621) may increase the risk of developing schizophrenia is presented.
Related JoVE Video
Associations between the angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism and monoamine metabolite concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid.
Psychiatry Res
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Angiotensin II has been suggested to influence central dopamine and serotonin turnover. Since the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) plays a key role in angiotensin regulation by converting inactive angiotensin I to active angiotensin II, we hypothesised that the functional insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in the ACE gene, which has previously been suggested to be associated with, depression and panic disorder, may influence monoamine activity. A well-established technique for assessing brain monoamine turnover in humans is to measure concentrations of monoamine metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We thus investigated possible associations between the ACE I/D polymorphism and CSF monoamine metabolite concentrations in a population of healthy male subjects. After having found such an association between the ACE I/D polymorphism and CSF levels of the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in this sample, I carriers displaying lower levels, we tried to replicate this observation in a population of violent male offenders from which also both CSF and DNA were available. Also in this sample, the same associations were found. Our results suggest that the ACE I/D polymorphism may play a role in the modulation of serotonergic and dopaminergic turnover in men.
Related JoVE Video
Association between the catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met polymorphism and panic disorder: a replication.
Psychiatry Res
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The association between the catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met polymorphism and panic disorder was studied in a Swedish sample of 211 patients and 452 controls. We found a significant excess of the Val allele in both male and female patients, the latter but not the former finding being in line with previous studies.
Related JoVE Video
Age-Related Olfactory Decline is Associated with the BDNF Val66met Polymorphism: Evidence from a Population-Based Study.
Front Aging Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The present study investigates the effect of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism on change in olfactory function in a large scale, longitudinal population-based sample (n = 836). The subjects were tested on a 13 item force-choice odor identification test on two test occasions over a 5-year-interval. Sex, education, health-related factors, and semantic ability were controlled for in the statistical analyses. Results showed an interaction effect of age and BDNF val66met on olfactory change, such that the magnitude of olfactory decline in the older age cohort (70-90 years old at baseline) was larger for the val homozygote carriers than for the met carriers. The older met carriers did not display larger age-related decline in olfactory function compared to the younger group. The BDNF val66met polymorphism did not affect the rate of decline in the younger age cohort (45-65 years). The findings are discussed in the light of the proposed roles of BDNF in neural development and maintenance.
Related JoVE Video
Manifesto for a European anxiety disorders research network.
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Despite the size, burden and costs of anxiety disorders, many patients remain unrecognised, and the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions in routine clinical practice can be disappointing. The European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) has established the ECNP Network Initiative (ECNP-NI) to help meet the goal of extending current understanding of the causes of central nervous system disorders, thereby contributing to improvements in clinical outcomes and reducing the associated societal burden. The Anxiety Disorders Research Network (ADRN) has been adopted within the ECNP-NI: this consensus statement summarises its overall aims and objectives.
Related JoVE Video
The dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) polymorphism is associated with premature ejaculation.
J Sex Med
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Previous research has suggested brain dopamine (DA) neurotransmission to be involved in the control of ejaculation. Furthermore, previous studies indicate a partly hereditary background to premature ejaculation.
Related JoVE Video
Further exploration of the possible influence of polymorphisms in HTR2C and 5HTT on body weight.
Metab. Clin. Exp.
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Receptors of the 5-HT2C subtype are of importance for the influence of serotonin on food intake, and 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms in this gene (HTR2C)--Cys23Ser (rs6318) and -759C>T (rs3813929)--have been reported to be associated with weight and/or antipsychotic-induced weight gain. The present study aimed to replicate these associations; in addition, the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) was assessed. The polymorphisms were genotyped in subjects recruited from the normal population (n = 510), and possible associations between genotype and body mass index (BMI) were assessed. The Ser23 allele was more common in underweight subjects (BMI <20) than in normal- and overweight (BMI > or =20) subjects (P = .006). The T allele of the -759C/T polymorphism was less common in the overweight group (BMI > or =25) (P = .007). Homozygosity for the short allele of 5-HTTLPR was more frequent in underweight subjects (P = .015). Our results are in agreement with previous studies, suggesting polymorphisms in HTR2C to be associated with body weight, particularly in women; and they also suggest that 5-HTTLPR may influence this phenotype. Further studies on the importance of the investigated genes for eating disorders and drug-induced weight gain are warranted.
Related JoVE Video
Acute and chronic treatment with serotonin reuptake inhibitors exert opposite effects on respiration in rats: possible implications for panic disorder.
J. Psychopharmacol. (Oxford)
PUBLISHED: 10-13-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Prompted by the suggested importance of respiration for the pathophysiology of panic disorder, we studied the influence of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) as well as other serotonin-modulating compounds on respiration in freely moving rats. The effect on respiration after acute administration of compounds enhancing synaptic levels of serotonin, that is, the serotonin reuptake inhibitors paroxetine and fluoxetine, the serotonin-releasing agents m-chlorophenylpiperazine and d-fenfluramine, and the selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100635, were investigated. All serotonin-releasing substances decreased respiratory rate in unrestrained, awake animals, suggesting the influence of serotonin on respiratory rate under these conditions to be mainly inhibitory. In line with a previous study, rats administered fluoxetine for 23 days or more, on the other hand, displayed an enhanced respiratory rate. The results reinforce the assumption that the effect of subchronic administration of a serotonin reuptake inhibitor on certain serotonin-regulated parameters may be opposite to that obtained after acute administration. We suggest that our observations may be of relevance for the fact that acute administration of SRIs, d-fenfluramine, or m-chlorophenylpiperazine often is anxiogenic in panic disorder patients, and that weeks of administration of an SRI leads to a very effective prevention of panic.
Related JoVE Video
Influence of androgen receptor repeat polymorphisms on personality traits in men.
J Psychiatry Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 05-19-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Testosterone has been attributed importance for various aspects of behaviour. The aim of our study was to investigate the potential influence of 2 functional polymorphisms in the amino terminal of the androgen receptor on personality traits in men.
Related JoVE Video
Update on research and treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder.
Harv Rev Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Many women in their reproductive years experience some mood, behavioral. or physical symptoms in the week prior to menses. Variability exists in the level of symptom burden in that some women experience mild symptoms, whereas a small minority experience severe and debilitating symptoms. For an estimated 5%-8% of premenopausal women, work or social functioning are affected by severe premenstrual syndrome. Many women in this group meet diagnostic criteria for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Among women who suffer from PMDD, mood and behavioral symptoms such as irritability, depressed mood, tension, and labile mood dominate. Somatic complaints, including breast tenderness and bloating, also can prove disruptive to womens overall functioning and quality of life. Recent evidence suggests that individual sensitivity to cyclical variations in levels of gonadal hormones may predispose certain women to experience these mood, behavioral, and somatic symptoms. Treatments include: antidepressants of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor class, taken intermittently or throughout the menstrual cycle; medications that suppress ovarian cyclicity; and newer oral contraceptives with novel progestins.
Related JoVE Video
Short onset of action of a serotonin reuptake inhibitor when used to reduce premenstrual irritability.
Neuropsychopharmacology
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Several studies suggest that serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) exert a more rapid effect when used for the treatment of symptoms such as anger and irritability then when used for depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, or anxiety. In line with this, premenstrual irritability can be effectively dampened by intermittent administration of an SRI, from ovulation to menstruation, indicating an onset of action of 10 days or less. How fast this effect appears, in terms of hours or days, is of considerable theoretical interest, but has previously not been studied in detail. To explore this issue, 22 women with marked premenstrual irritability, who previously had responded to paroxetine, were given this compound during two menstrual cycles and placebo during one cycle in a double-blind, cross-over fashion. The women were asked to start medication in the midst of the luteal phase when irritability had been intense for 2 days. The paroxetine cycles differed significantly from the placebo cycle as early as 14 h after drug intake with respect to the number of subjects experiencing sustained reduction in irritability. When the different cycles were compared with respect to irritability-rating scores for each time of assessment, the difference was significant at day 3. The side effect nausea had an even more rapid onset (4 h), but usually disappeared within 4 days. To summarize, this controlled trial shows that an SRI reduces premenstrual irritability already within a few days after the onset of treatment.
Related JoVE Video
Association between the AGTR1 polymorphism +1166A>C and serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.
Regul. Pept.
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Genetic factors have been shown to influence high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels, however, which genes that are involved in this process remains to be clarified. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is of importance for the regulation of inflammation, and blockade of angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AGTR1) influences hsCRP levels. These findings prompted us to investigate whether a polymorphism in the AGTR1 gene may influence hsCRP levels. Additionally, a polymorphism in the CRP gene that has previously been shown to influence hsCRP levels was genotyped. Serum levels of hsCRP were measured in 270 42-year-old women recruited from the population registry. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms were analysed: +1166A>C and +1444C>T of the AGTR1 and CRP gene, respectively. The A allele of the AGTR1 polymorphism +1166A>C was dose-dependently associated with higher hsCRP levels (p=0.014, adjusted for confounding factors and multiple comparisons). hsCRP levels were not significantly influenced by the CRP +1444C>T genotype; however, an interaction between the two studied polymorphisms with respect to hsCRP levels was observed (p=0.018). The significant association between the AGTR1 polymorphism and hsCRP levels, which appears to be independent of anthropometric and metabolic traits, is yet another indication of a direct influence of RAS on inflammation.
Related JoVE Video
Genetic variation in brain-derived neurotrophic factor is associated with serotonin transporter but not serotonin-1A receptor availability in men.
Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The serotonergic system, including the serotonin transporter (5-HTT), which is the target of many antidepressants, seems to be influenced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).
Related JoVE Video
Early postnatal oestradiol exposure causes insulin resistance and signs of inflammation in circulation and skeletal muscle.
J. Endocrinol.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Early postnatal events can predispose to metabolic and endocrine disease in adulthood. In this study, we evaluated the programming effects of a single early postnatal oestradiol injection on insulin sensitivity in adult female rats. We also assessed the expression of genes involved in inflammation and glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue and analysed circulating inflammation markers as possible mediators of insulin resistance. Neonatal oestradiol exposure reduced insulin sensitivity and increased plasma levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1. In skeletal muscle, oestradiol increased the expression of genes encoding complement component 3 (C3), Mcp-1, retinol binding protein-4 (Rbp4) and transforming growth factor beta1 (Tgfbeta1). C3 and MCP-1 are both related to insulin resistance, and C3, MCP-1 and TGFbeta1 are also involved in inflammation. Expression of genes encoding glucose transporter-4 (Glut 4), carnitine-palmitoyl transferase 1b (Cpt1b), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (Ppard) and uncoupling protein 3 (Ucp3), which are connected to glucose uptake, lipid oxidation, and energy uncoupling, was down regulated. Expression of several inflammatory genes in skeletal muscle correlated negatively with whole-body insulin sensitivity. In s.c. inguinal adipose tissue, expression of Tgfbeta1, Ppard and C3 was decreased, while expression of Rbp4 and Cpt1b was increased. Inguinal adipose tissue weight was increased but adipocyte size was unaltered, suggesting an increased number of adipocytes. We suggest that early neonatal oestrogen exposure may reduce insulin sensitivity by inducing chronic, low-grade systemic and skeletal muscle inflammation and disturbances of glucose and lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle in adulthood.
Related JoVE Video
Possible association between the androgen receptor gene and autism spectrum disorder.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Autism is a highly heritable disorder but the specific genes involved remain largely unknown. The higher prevalence of autism in men than in women, in conjunction with a number of other observations, has led to the suggestion that prenatal brain exposure to androgens may be of importance for the development of this condition. Prompted by this hypothesis, we investigated the potential influence of variation in the androgen receptor (AR) gene on the susceptibility for autism. To this end, 267 subjects with autism spectrum disorder and 617 controls were genotyped for three polymorphisms in exon 1 of the AR gene: the CAG repeat, the GGN repeat and the rs6152 SNP. In addition, parents and affected siblings were genotyped for 118 and 32 of the cases, respectively. Case-control comparisons revealed higher prevalence of short CAG alleles as well as of the A allele of the rs6152 SNP in female cases than in controls, but revealed no significant differences with respect to the GGN repeat. Analysis of the 118 families using transmission disequilibrium test, on the other hand, suggested an association with the GGN polymorphism, the rare 20-repeat allele being undertransmitted to male cases and the 23-repeat allele being overtransmitted to female cases. Sequencing of the AR gene in 46 patients revealed no mutations or rare variants. The results lend some support for an influence of the studied polymorphisms on the susceptibility for autism, but argue against the possibility that mutations in the AR gene are common in subjects with this condition.
Related JoVE Video
Do polymorphisms in transcription factors LMX1A and LMX1B influence the risk for Parkinsons disease?
J Neural Transm
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The key symptoms of Parkinsons disease (PD) are caused by degeneration of dopamine neurons originating in substantia nigra. Whereas, transcription factor LMX1A is crucial for the differentiation of mesencephalic dopamine neurons, LMX1B appears to be important for both the development and the survival of these cells. The aim of this study was to investigate if genetic variation in LMX1A and LMX1B differs between patients with PD (n = 357) and control subjects (n = 1428) by genotyping 33 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in LMX1A and 11 SNPs in LMX1B. Three SNPs in LMX1A and one in LMX1B were associated with PD. After splitting for gender, six SNPs were associated with PD in women and four in men. The significances obtained did not survive correction for multiple testing, and our results should hence be interpreted with caution, but are partly in line with a previous report, and should thus be of sufficient interest to encourage further studies of these genes in PD.
Related JoVE Video
Genotype over-diagnosis in amygdala responsiveness: affective processing in social anxiety disorder.
J Psychiatry Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Although the amygdala is thought to be a crucial brain region for negative affect, neuroimaging studies do not always show enhanced amygdala response to aversive stimuli in patients with anxiety disorders. Serotonin (5-HT)-related genotypes may contribute to interindividual variability in amygdala responsiveness. The short (s) allele of the 5-HT transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and the T variant of the G-703T polymorphism in the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2) gene have previously been associated with amygdala hyperresponsivity to negative faces in healthy controls. We investigated the influence of these polymorphisms on amygdala responsiveness to angry faces in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) compared with healthy controls.
Related JoVE Video
Serotonin transporter genotype is associated with cognitive performance but not regional 5-HT1A receptor binding in humans.
Int. J. Neuropsychopharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The human serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene is one of the most extensively studied in psychiatry. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the 5-HTT gene (5-HTTLPR) has been associated with several psychiatric disorders as well as anxiety-related personality traits. In search of a mechanistic understanding of the functional implications of 5-HTTLPR, the influence of this polymorphism on regional 5-HT1A receptor density has previously been examined in two positron emission tomography (PET) studies in humans, yielding, however, contradictory results. In the present study, 54 control subjects were examined with [11C]WAY 100635 PET and a battery of cognitive tests. Regional binding potential (BP) of [11C]WAY 100635 to 5-HT1A receptor was calculated for the dorsal raphe nuclei, the hippocampus, the anterior cingulate, the insula, the temporal cortex and the frontal cortex. The influence of 5-HTTLPR genotype on regional 5-HT1A BP and cognitive performance was investigated. No differences in 5-HT1A receptor density between carriers and non-carriers of the S allele were found. Thus, we could not replicate any of the previously reported associations between 5-HTTLPR and 5-HT1A density. There was, however, a highly significant association between 5-HTTLPR genotype and performance in Wisconsin Card Sorting Test; carriers of the S allele had a superior performance compared to the LL carriers. These observations suggest that functional implications of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism are not likely to be mediated by differences in 5-HT1A expression levels and that other biomarkers must be considered for future investigations at phenotype level.
Related JoVE Video
Ghrelin influences novelty seeking behavior in rodents and men.
PLoS ONE
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Recent discoveries indicate an important role for ghrelin in drug and alcohol reward and an ability of ghrelin to regulate mesolimbic dopamine activity. The role of dopamine in novelty seeking, and the association between this trait and drug and alcohol abuse, led us to hypothesize that ghrelin may influence novelty seeking behavior. To test this possibility we applied several complementary rodent models of novelty seeking behavior, i.e. inescapable novelty-induced locomotor activity (NILA), novelty-induced place preference and novel object exploration, in rats subjected to acute ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor; GHSR) stimulation or blockade. Furthermore we assessed the possible association between polymorphisms in the genes encoding ghrelin and GHSR and novelty seeking behavior in humans. The rodent studies indicate an important role for ghrelin in a wide range of novelty seeking behaviors. Ghrelin-injected rats exhibited a higher preference for a novel environment and increased novel object exploration. Conversely, those with GHSR blockade drastically reduced their preference for a novel environment and displayed decreased NILA. Importantly, the mesolimbic ventral tegmental area selective GHSR blockade was sufficient to reduce the NILA response indicating that the mesolimbic GHSRs might play an important role in the observed novelty responses. Moreover, in untreated animals, a striking positive correlation between NILA and sucrose reward behavior was detected. Two GHSR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs2948694 and rs495225, were significantly associated with the personality trait novelty seeking, as assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), in human subjects. This study provides the first evidence for a role of ghrelin in novelty seeking behavior in animals and humans, and also points to an association between food reward and novelty seeking in rodents.
Related JoVE Video
Decreased medial temporal lobe activation in BDNF (66)Met allele carriers during memory encoding.
Neuropsychologia
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The Met allele of the Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val(66)Met polymorphism has been associated with impaired activity-dependent secretion of BDNF protein and decreased memory performance. Results from imaging studies relating Val(66)Met to brain activation during memory processing have been inconsistent, with reports of both increased and decreased activation in the Medial Temporal Lobe (MTL) in Met carriers relative to Val homozygotes. Here, we extensively studied BDNF Val(66)Met in relation to brain activation and white matter integrity as well as memory performance in a large imaging (n=194) and behavioral (n=2229) sample, respectively. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate MTL activation in healthy participants in the age of 55-75 years during a face-name episodic encoding and retrieval task. White matter integrity was measured using diffusion tensor imaging. BDNF Met allele carriers had significantly decreased activation in the MTL during encoding processes, but not during retrieval processes. In contrast to previous proposals, the effect was not modulated by age and the polymorphism was not related to white matter integrity. Met carriers had lower memory performance than Val homozygotes, but differences were subtle and not significant. In conclusion, the BDNF Met allele has a negative influence on MTL functioning, preferentially during encoding processes, which might translate into impaired episodic memory function.
Related JoVE Video
The Genetics of Sexuality and Aggression (GSA) twin samples in Finland.
Twin Res Hum Genet
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The Genetics of Sexuality and Aggression (GSA) project was launched at the Abo Akademi University in Turku, Finland in 2005 and has so far undertaken two major population-based data collections involving twins and siblings of twins. To date, it consists of about 14,000 individuals (including 1,147 informative monozygotic twin pairs, 1,042 informative same-sex dizygotic twin pairs, 741 informative opposite-sex dizygotic twin pairs). Participants have been recruited through the Central Population Registry of Finland and were 18-49 years of age at the time of the data collections. Saliva samples for DNA genotyping (n = 4,278) and testosterone analyses (n = 1,168) were collected in 2006. The primary focus of the data collections has been on sexuality (both sexual functioning and sexual behavior) and aggressive behavior. This paper provides an overview of the data collections as well as an outline of the phenotypes and biological data assembled within the project. A detailed overview of publications can be found at the projects Web site: http://www.cebg.fi/.
Related JoVE Video
A possible association between panic disorder and a polymorphism in the preproghrelingene.
Psychiatry Res
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate whether polymorphisms in the preproghrelin gene are associated with anxiety disorders, such as panic disorder, in humans. Panic disorder is a severe anxiety disorder, characterized by sudden attacks of intense fear or anxiety in combination with somatic symptoms. The preproghrelin gene codes for two gut-derived circulating peptides that have been linked to anxiety-like behaviour in rodents: ghrelin (an orexigenic, pro-obesity hormone) and obestatin. In the present study, we genotyped three missense mutations in the preproghrelin gene in 215 patients suffering from panic disorder and in 451 controls. The A allele of the rs4684677 polymorphism was significantly associated with panic disorder, while there were no significant associations with the two other polymorphisms studied. We conclude that the rs4684677 (Gln90Leu) polymorphism in the preproghrelin gene may be associated with increased risk of panic disorder. It will be important to confirm these findings in additional panic disorder patient groups.
Related JoVE Video
A reassessment of the possible effects of the serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphism 5-HTTLPR on premature ejaculation.
Arch Sex Behav
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A population-based sample of 1673 (valid phenotypic and genotypic data were available from 1412 individuals) Finnish male twins and siblings of twins aged 18-45 years provided questionnaire data regarding ejaculatory function as well as saliva samples for genotype analyses. Genotypic analyses were conducted controlling for between-subjects dependence. No significant association was found between the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and a composite variable measuring premature ejaculation or between this polymorphism and a self-report measure of ejaculation latency time. Previously conducted studies have found contradicting results regarding the possible role of 5-HTTLPR in premature ejaculation. Methodological inconsistencies have been pointed out in these studies, which have all been conducted on rather small samples. While differences in terms of measurement of ejaculatory function could partly explain why positive findings from some earlier studies could not be replicated, the present study, given the large sample size and multifactorial measures used, indicated that the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism has a limited, if any, impact on ejaculatory function.
Related JoVE Video
Premenstrual dysphoric disorder: evidence for a new category for DSM-5.
Am J Psychiatry
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Premenstrual dysphoric disorder, which affects 2%–5% of premenopausal women, was included in Appendix B of DSMIV, "Criterion Sets and Axes Provided for Further Study." Since then, aided by the inclusion of specific and rigorous criteria in DSM-IV, there has been an explosion of research on the epidemiology, phenomenology, pathogenesis, and treatment of the disorder. In 2009, the Mood Disorders Work Group for DSM-5 convened a group of experts to examine the literature on premenstrual dysphoric disorder and provide recommendations regarding the appropriate criteria and placement for the disorder in DSM-5. Based on thorough review and lengthy discussion, the work group proposed that the information on the diagnosis, treatment, and validation of the disorder has matured sufficiently for it to qualify as a full category in DSM-5. A move to the position of category, rather than a criterion set in need of further study, will provide greater legitimacy for the disorder and encourage the growth of evidence-based research, ultimately leading to new treatments.
Related JoVE Video
The extreme male brain revisited: gender coherence in adults with autism spectrum disorder.
Br J Psychiatry
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The extreme male brain theory suggests that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is an extreme variant of male intelligence. However, somewhat paradoxically, many individuals with ASD display androgynous physical features regardless of gender.
Related JoVE Video
A study of possible associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the serotonin receptor 1A, 1B, and 2C genes and self-reported ejaculation latency time.
J Sex Med
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Previous research has indicated that serotonergic genes may influence ejaculatory function. Attempts to investigate effects of polymorphisms in serotonergic genes have been carried out, but so far, no study has conducted exploratory genotype analyses regarding the serotonin receptor 1A, 1B, and 2C subtypes, which have been hypothesized to mediate the inhibitory effects of serotonin on ejaculation in rodents.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.