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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
2-Aminothiazolones as anti-HIV agents that act as gp120-CD4 inhibitors.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2014
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We report here the synthesis of 2-aminothiazolones along with their biological properties as novel anti-HIV agents. Such compounds have proven to act through the inhibition of the gp120-CD4 protein-protein interaction that occurs at the very early stage of the HIV-1 entry process. No cytotoxicity was found for these compounds, and broad antiviral activities against laboratory strains and pseudotyped viruses were documented. Docking simulations have also been applied to predict the mechanism, at the molecular level, by which the inhibitors were able to interact within the Phe43 cavity of HIV-1 gp120. Furthermore, a preliminary absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) evaluation was performed. Overall, this study led the basis for the development of more potent HIV entry inhibitors.
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In vitro phenotypes to elvitegravir and dolutegravir in primary macrophages and lymphocytes of clonal recombinant viral variants selected in patients failing raltegravir.
J. Antimicrob. Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2013
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The cross-resistance profiles of elvitegravir and dolutegravir on raltegravir-resistant variants is still controversial or not available in macrophages and lack extensive evaluations on wide panels of clonal variants. Thus, a complete evaluation in parallel with all currently available integrase inhibitors (INIs) was performed.
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Infection and coinfection of human rhinovirus C in stem cell transplant recipients.
Clin. Dev. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2013
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In 54 adult stem cell transplant recipients, the presence and persistence of human rhinoviruses (including the novel lineage C) were evaluated by molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis, independently from respiratory symptoms. In the same group of patients, the presence of other coinfecting respiratory pathogens, including the novel enterovirus 109, was also evaluated.
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The new and less toxic protease inhibitor saquinavir-NO maintains anti-HIV-1 properties in vitro indistinguishable from those of the parental compound saquinavir.
Antiviral Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2011
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Although, the antiviral activity, tolerability and convenience of protease inhibitors have improved significantly in recent years, toxicity-associated adverse events including diarrhea, lipid alterations, disturbance of glucose homeostasis and liver enzyme elevations still remain a major concern during treatment of HIV-1 patients. We have recently shown that the covalent attachment of the NO moiety to the HIV-1 protease inhibitor saquinavir (Saq-NO) reduces its toxicity. In this study, we evaluated in vitro the anti-HIV activity of Saq-NO vs. its parental compound Saq. Site directed mutants with the most frequently identified Saq associated resistance mutations and their combinations were generated on proviral AD8-based backbones. Phenotypic assays were conducted using wild type clinical isolates and fully replicating recombinant viruses with Saq and Saq-NO in parallel on purified CD4+ T cells. The following recombinant viruses were generated and tested: L33F, M46I, G48V, I54V, I84V + L90M, M46I + L90M, G48V + L90M, M46I + I54V + L90M, L33F + M46I + L90M. The fold change resistance compared to the wild type viruses was between 1.3 and 7 for all single mutants, between 3.4 and 20 for double mutants and between 16.7 and 28.5 for viruses carrying three mutations for both compounds. The results clearly demonstrate that Saq-NO maintains an anti-HIV-1 profile very similar to that of Saq. The possibility to reduce Saq associated side effects and to increase the concentration of the drug in vivo may allow a higher and possibly more effective dosage of Saq-NO in HIV-1-infected patients and to increase the genetic barrier of this PI thus impairing the selection of resistant clones.
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The role of infections and coinfections with newly identified and emerging respiratory viruses in children.
Virol. J.
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Acute respiratory infections are a major cause of morbidity in children both in developed and developing countries. A wide range of respiratory viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza A and B viruses, parainfluenza viruses (PIVs), adenovirus, rhinovirus (HRV), have repeatedly been detected in acute lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in children in the past decades. However, in the last ten years thanks to progress in molecular technologies, newly discovered viruses have been identified including human Metapneumovirus (hMPV), coronaviruses NL63 (HcoV-NL63) and HKU1 (HcoV-HKU1), human Bocavirus (HBoV), new enterovirus (HEV), parechovirus (HpeV) and rhinovirus (HRV) strains, polyomaviruses WU (WUPyV) and KI (KIPyV) and the pandemic H1N1v influenza A virus. These discoveries have heavily modified previous knowledge on respiratory infections mainly highlighting that pediatric population is exposed to a variety of viruses with similar seasonal patterns. In this context establishing a causal link between a newly identified virus and the disease as well as an association between mixed infections and an increase in disease severity can be challenging. This review will present an overview of newly recognized as well as the main emerging respiratory viruses and seek to focus on the their contribution to infection and co-infection in LRTIs in childhood.
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Epidemiological, molecular and clinical features of enterovirus 109 infection in children and in adult stem cell transplant recipients.
Virol. J.
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A novel human enterovirus (HEV) type within the species HEV-C, named EV109, was discovered from cases of respiratory illness in Nicaragua in September 2010. The aim of this study, was to retrospectively examine the presence and the role of EV109 in respiratory samples from two patients populations; infants below the age of 2 years, hospitalized for acute respiratory diseases (ARDs) and adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.
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Viral tropism by geno2pheno as a tool for predicting CD4 decrease in HIV-1-infected naive patients with high CD4 counts.
J. Antimicrob. Chemother.
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To investigate the value of tropism (determined by genotypic testing) to predict CD4 depletion in HIV-infected antiretroviral-naive patients with high CD4 counts.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.