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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Pathways Community Care Coordination in Low Birth Weight Prevention.
Matern Child Health J
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2014
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The evidence is limited on the effectiveness of home visiting care coordination in addressing poor birth outcome, including low birth weight (LBW). The Community Health Access Project (CHAP) utilizes community health workers (CHWs) to identify women at risk of having poor birth outcomes, connect them to health and social services, and track each identified health or social issue to a measurable completion. CHWs are trained individuals from the same highest risk communities. The CHAP Pathways Model is used to track each maternal health and social service need to resolution and CHWs are paid based upon outcomes. We evaluated the impact of the CHAP Pathways program on LBW in an urban Ohio community. Women participating in CHAP and having a live birth in 2001 through 2004 constituted the intervention group. Using birth certificate records, each CHAP birth was matched through propensity score to a control birth from the same census tract and year. Logistic regression was used to examine the association of CHAP participation with LBW while controlling for risk factors for LBW. We identified 115 CHAP clients and 115 control births. Among the intervention group there were seven LBW births (6.1 %) compared with 15 (13.0 %) among non-CHAP clients. The adjusted odds ratio for LBW was 0.35 (95 % confidence interval, 0.12-0.96) among CHAP clients. This study provides evidence that structured community care coordination coupled with tracking and payment for outcomes may reduce LBW birth among high-risk women.
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Trends in body mass index among Ohios third-grade children: 2004-2005 to 2009-2010.
J Acad Nutr Diet
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2013
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Substantial variation across states in the prevalence and trends in childhood overweight and obesity indicate a need for state-specific surveillance to make state comparisons to national estimates and identify high-risk populations. The purpose of this study was to examine body mass index (BMI) trends among third-grade children in Ohio between the 2004-2005 and 2009-2010 school years and examine changes in prevalence of obesity by specific demographic subgroups. Third-grade children (n=33,672) were directly weighed and measured throughout the school years by trained health care professionals. Trends in overweight/obesity (?85th percentile of BMI by age/sex), obesity (?95th percentile), and obesity level 2 (?97th percentile) over five time periods (2004-2005, 2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010) were modeled using logistic regression, accounting for the survey design and adjusting for sex, race/ethnicity, National School Lunch Program (NSLP) participation, and age. Differences in these BMI categories were also examined by these subgroups. BMI estimates did not demonstrate a statistically significant trend over the five time periods for overweight/obesity (34% to 36%), obesity (18% to 20%), or obesity level 2 (12% to 14%). However, increases in overweight/obesity prevalence were found in Hispanic children (37.8% vs 53.1%; P<0.01). Decreases in obesity (16.6% vs 14.1%; P=0.02) and obesity level 2 (11.3% vs 9.3%; P=0.02) were found among children not participating in NSLP and residing in suburban counties (obesity [17.3% vs 14.7%; P=0.03] and obesity level 2 [11.8% vs 9.8%; P=0.05]). Finally, decreases in overweight/obesity and obesity level 2 among boys were observed (15% vs 12.9%; P=0.02). Despite no significant overall trends in overweight/obesity, obesity, or obesity level 2 between 2004 and 2010, prevalence changed among specific subgroups. Obesity prevention efforts should be widespread and include special emphasis on groups experiencing increases or no change in prevalence.
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Methods for a survey of overweight and obesity coordinated with oral health surveillance among Ohio third-grade students.
Prev Chronic Dis
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2009
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Data on overweight and obesity prevalence among children enable state and local officials to develop, target, fund, and evaluate policies and programs to address childhood overweight. During the 2004-2005 school year, the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) conducted surveillance of elementary school-aged children through coordination with the ODH oral health survey to create a system that would provide county and state estimates of obesity and overweight prevalence.
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Access to patient-centered medical home among Ohios Children with Special Health Care Needs.
J Child Health Care
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Medical homes deliver primary care that is accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family centered, coordinated, compassionate and culturally effective. Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) require a wide range of support to maintain health, making medical home access particularly important. We sought to understand independent risk factors for lacking access. We analyzed Ohio, USA data from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (2005-2006). Among CSHCN, 55.6% had medical home access. The proportion achieving each medical home component was highest for having a personal doctor/nurse and lowest for receiving coordinated care, family-centered care and referrals. Specific subsets of CSHCN were significantly and independently more likely to lack medical home access: Hispanic (AOR=3.08), moderate/high severity of difficulty (AOR=2.84), and any public insurance (AOR=1.60). Efforts to advance medical home access must give special attention to these CSHCN populations and improvements must be made to referral access, family-centered care, and care coordination.
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Preconception health indicators: a comparison between non-Appalachian and Appalachian women.
Matern Child Health J
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To compare preconception health indicators (PCHIs) among non-pregnant women aged 18-44 years residing in Appalachian and non-Appalachian counties in 13 U.S. states. Data from the 1997-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to estimate the prevalence of PCHIs among women in states with ?1 Appalachian county. Counties were classified as Appalachian (n = 36,496 women) or non-Appalachian (n = 88,312 women) and Appalachian counties were categorized according to economic status. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression models examined differences in PCHIs among women by (1) Appalachian residence, and (2) economic classification. Appalachian women were younger, lower income, and more often white and married compared to women in non-Appalachia. Appalachian women had significantly higher odds of reporting
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Inter-rater reliability of ohio school-based overweight and obesity surveillance data.
J Acad Nutr Diet
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Measurement of height and weight in large studies may force the use of multiple measurers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) measures collected by multiple measurers in a large, statewide BMI surveillance program. A random subsample of schools (n=30) was selected from schools that participated in the 2009 to 2010 Ohio third-grade Oral Health/BMI surveillance program. Children (n=1,189) were measured by multiple volunteer health professional measurers and again by a trained researcher, who was standard across all schools. Mean differences for height, weight, and BMI percentiles were calculated for BMI category classifications. Agreement was estimated by the reliability coefficient, McNemars test, and Kappa statistic. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were estimated using the trained researcher measures as the reference. Overall mean differences (95% confidence interval) were 0.45 (0.41-0.48) cm for height, 0.07 (-0.01-0.15) kg for weight, and 1.37 (1.20-1.53) for BMI. The correlation coefficient for all three measures was over 0.9 (P<0.01), indicating a strong positive association between measures. BMI category classifications showed substantial reliability (Kappa range: 0.94-0.96). Percentage agreement ranged from 98% to 99% for all BMI categories, as did sensitivities and specificities. Positive predictive values for all BMI categories were approximately 97%, and close to 100% for negative predictive values. Reliability for height, weight, BMI percentile, and BMI classification was very high, supporting the use of multiple trained measurers in a statewide BMI surveillance program. Similar methods can be applied to other public health and clinical settings to improve anthropometric measurement reliability.
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Improving Care for Women with a History of Gestational Diabetes: A Provider Perspective.
Matern Child Health J
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To identify perceived roles with regard to care for women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) history and resources for improving care among women with a history of GDM from the perspective of obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), certified nurse midwives (CNM), family practitioners, and internists. In 2010, a survey was sent to a random sample of OB/GYNs, CNM, family practitioners, and internists (n = 2,375) in Ohio to assess knowledge, attitudes, and postpartum practices regarding diabetes prevention for women with a history of GDM. A total of 904 practitioners completed the survey (46 %). Over 70 % of CNMs strongly agreed it is part of their job to help women with GDM history improve diet and increase exercise, compared with 60 % of family practitioners/internists and 55 % of OB/GYNs (p < 0.001). More OB/GYNs and CNMs identified a need for more local nutrition specialists and patient education materials, compared with family practitioners/ internists. Between 60 and 70 % of OB/GYNs and CNMs reported lifestyle modification programs and corresponding reimbursement would better support them to provide improved care. Health care providers giving care to women with GDM history have varying perceptions of their roles, however, there was agreement on resources needed to improve care.
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Comprehensive Smoke-Free Policies: A Tool for Improving Preconception Health?
Matern Child Health J
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Lower income women are at higher risk for preconception and prenatal smoking, are less likely to spontaneously quit smoking during pregnancy, and have higher prenatal relapse rates than women in higher income groups. Policies prohibiting tobacco smoking in public places are intended to reduce exposure to secondhand smoke; additionally, since these policies promote a smoke-free norm, there have been associations between smoke-free policies and reduced smoking prevalence. Given the public health burden of smoking, particularly among women who become pregnant, our objective was to assess the impact of smoke-free policies on the odds of preconception smoking among low-income women. We estimated the odds of preconception smoking among low-income women in Ohio between 2002 and 2009 using data from repeated cross-sectional samples of women participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). A logistic spline regression was applied fitting a knot at the point of enforcement of the Ohio Smoke-free Workplace Act to evaluate whether this policy was associated with changes in the odds of smoking. After adjusting for individual- and environmental-level factors, the Ohio Smoke-free Workplace Act was associated with a small, but statistically significant reduction in the odds of preconception smoking in WIC participants. Comprehensive smoke-free policies prohibiting smoking in public places and workplaces may also be associated with reductions in smoking among low-income women. This type of policy or environmental change strategy may promote a tobacco-free norm and improve preconception health among a population at risk for smoking.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.