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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Sodium-to-Potassium Ratio and Blood Pressure, Hypertension, and Related Factors.
Adv Nutr
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2014
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The potential cost-effectiveness and feasibility of dietary interventions aimed at reducing hypertension risk are of considerable interest and significance in public health. In particular, the effectiveness of restricted sodium or increased potassium intake on mitigating hypertension risk has been demonstrated in clinical and observational research. The role that modified sodium or potassium intake plays in influencing the renin-angiotensin system, arterial stiffness, and endothelial dysfunction remains of interest in current research. Up to the present date, no known systematic review has examined whether the sodium-to-potassium ratio or either sodium or potassium alone is more strongly associated with blood pressure and related factors, including the renin-angiotensin system, arterial stiffness, the augmentation index, and endothelial dysfunction, in humans. This article presents a systematic review and synthesis of the randomized controlled trials and observational research related to this issue. The main findings show that, among the randomized controlled trials reviewed, the sodium-to-potassium ratio appears to be more strongly associated with blood pressure outcomes than either sodium or potassium alone in hypertensive adult populations. Recent data from the observational studies reviewed provide additional support for the sodium-to-potassium ratio as a superior metric to either sodium or potassium alone in the evaluation of blood pressure outcomes and incident hypertension. It remains unclear whether this is true in normotensive populations and in children and for related outcomes including the renin-angiotensin system, arterial stiffness, the augmentation index, and endothelial dysfunction. Future study in these populations is warranted.
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Etiologic heterogeneity among non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes: the InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst. Monographs
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2014
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Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) comprises biologically and clinically heterogeneous subtypes. Previously, study size has limited the ability to compare and contrast the risk factor profiles among these heterogeneous subtypes.
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Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for sporadic Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia: the Interlymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst. Monographs
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2014
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The etiologic role of medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors in sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is unknown, but epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that risk factors may vary by age.
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Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for peripheral T-cell lymphomas: the InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst. Monographs
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2014
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Accounting for 10%-15% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas in Western populations, peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are the most common T-cell lymphoma but little is known about their etiology. Our aim was to identify etiologic risk factors for PTCL overall, and for specific PTCL subtypes, by analyzing data from 15 epidemiologic studies participating in the InterLymph Consortium.
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A review and critique of U.S. EPA's risk assessments for asbestos.
Crit. Rev. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2014
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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently conducted a risk assessment for exposure to Libby amphibole asbestos that is precedent-setting for two reasons. First, the Agency has not previously conducted a risk assessment for a specific type of asbestos fiber. Second, the risk assessment includes not only an inhalation unit risk (IUR) for the cancer endpoints, but also a reference concentration (RfC) for nonmalignant disease. In this paper, we review the procedures used by the Agency for both cancer and nonmalignant disease and discuss the strengths and limitations of these procedures. The estimate of the RfC uses the benchmark dose method applied to pleural plaques in a small subcohort of vermiculite workers in Marysville, Ohio. We show that these data are too sparse to inform the exposure-response relationship in the low-exposure region critical for estimation of an RfC, and that different models with very different exposure-response shapes fit the data equally well. Furthermore, pleural plaques do not represent a disease condition and do not appear to meet the EPA's definition of an adverse condition. The estimation of the IUR for cancer is based on a subcohort of Libby miners, discarding the vast majority of lung cancers and mesotheliomas in the entire cohort and ignoring important time-related factors in exposure and risk, including effect modification by age. We propose that an IUR based on an endpoint that combines lung cancer, mesothelioma, and nonmalignant respiratory disease (NMRD) in this cohort would protect against both malignant and nonmalignant disease. However, the IUR should be based on the entire cohort of Libby miners, and the analysis should properly account for temporal factors. We illustrate our discussion with our own independent analyses of the data used by the Agency.
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A critical review of perfluorooctanoate and perfluorooctanesulfonate exposure and cancer risk in humans.
Crit. Rev. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2014
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Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) are ubiquitous synthetic chemicals with no known effect on human cancer development. This article systematically and critically reviews the epidemiologic evidence regarding the association between PFOA and PFOS exposure and cancer risk in humans. Eighteen epidemiologic studies - eight of PFOA, four of PFOS, and six of both PFOA and PFOS - have estimated associations of exposure to these chemicals with cancer incidence or mortality, with studies equally divided between occupational and nonoccupational settings. Although some statistically significant positive associations have been reported, for example, with cancers of the prostate, kidney, testis, and thyroid, the majority of relative risk estimates for both PFOA and PFOS have been between 0.5 and 2.0 (with 95% confidence intervals including 1.0), inconsistently detected across studies, counterbalanced by negative associations, not indicative of a monotonic exposure-response relationship, and not coherent with toxicological evidence in animals, in which the primary target organs are the liver, testis (Leydig cells), and pancreas (acinar cells). Many positive associations with PFOA exposure were detected in community settings without occupational exposure and were not supported by results in exposed workers. Given that occupational exposure to PFOA and PFOS is one to two orders of magnitude higher than environmental exposure, the discrepant positive findings are likely due to chance, confounding, and/or bias. Taken together, the epidemiologic evidence does not support the hypothesis of a causal association between PFOA or PFOS exposure and cancer in humans.
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Validity of geographically modeled environmental exposure estimates.
Crit. Rev. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2014
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Geographic modeling is increasingly being used to estimate long-term environmental exposures in epidemiologic studies of chronic disease outcomes. However, without validation against measured environmental concentrations, personal exposure levels, or biologic doses, these models cannot be assumed a priori to be accurate. This article discusses three examples of epidemiologic associations involving exposures estimated using geographic modeling, and identifies important issues that affect geographically modeled exposure assessment in these areas. In air pollution epidemiology, geographic models of fine particulate matter levels have frequently been validated against measured environmental levels, but comparisons between ambient and personal exposure levels have shown only moderate correlations. Estimating exposure to magnetic fields by using geographically modeled distances is problematic because the error is larger at short distances, where field levels can vary substantially. Geographic models of environmental exposure to pesticides, including paraquat, have seldom been validated against environmental or personal levels, and validation studies have yielded inconsistent and typically modest results. In general, the exposure misclassification resulting from geographic models of environmental exposures can be differential and can result in bias away from the null even if non-differential. Therefore, geographic exposure models must be rigorously constructed and validated if they are to be relied upon to produce credible scientific results to inform epidemiologic research. To our knowledge, such models have not yet successfully predicted an association between an environmental exposure and a chronic disease outcome that has eventually been established as causal, and may not be capable of doing so in the absence of thorough validation.
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Outcomes after diagnosis of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome before 30 years of age: a population-based study.
JAMA Dermatol
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2014
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Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome (MF/SS) are rare in children and young adults, and thus the incidence and outcomes in this patient population are not well studied.
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A critical review of the epidemiology of Agent Orange/TCDD and prostate cancer.
Eur. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2014
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To inform risk assessment and regulatory decision-making, the relationship between 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and prostate cancer requires clarification. This article systematically and critically reviews the epidemiologic evidence on the association between exposure to TCDD or Agent Orange, a TCDD-contaminated herbicide used during the Vietnam War, and prostate cancer risk. Articles evaluated include 11 studies of three cohorts, four case-control or cross-sectional studies, and three case-only studies of military veterans with information on estimated Agent Orange or TCDD exposure; 13 studies of seven cohorts, one case-control study, and eight proportionate morbidity or mortality studies of Vietnam veterans without information on Agent Orange exposure; 11 cohort studies of workers with occupational exposure to TCDD; and two studies of one community cohort with environmental exposure to TCDD. The most informative studies, including those of Vietnam veterans involved in Agent Orange spraying or other handling, herbicide manufacturing or spraying workers with occupational TCDD exposure, and community members exposed to TCDD through an industrial accident, consistently reported no significant increase in prostate cancer incidence or mortality. Only some potentially confounded studies of Vietnam veterans compared with the general population, studies with unreliable estimates of Agent Orange exposure, and analyses of selected subgroups of Vietnam veterans reported positive associations. Overall, epidemiologic research offers no consistent or convincing evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to Agent Orange or TCDD and prostate cancer. More accurate exposure assessment is needed in large epidemiologic studies to rule out a causal association more conclusively.
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A systematic review of multivitamin-multimineral use and cardiovascular disease and cancer incidence and total mortality.
J Am Coll Nutr
PUBLISHED: 11-14-2013
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Multivitamin-multimineral (MVM) supplements are the most frequently used dietary supplements in the United States, with one third or more of the population using at least one daily. However, the health-related implications of MVM use are unclear. Thus, we systematically reviewed and summarized the prospective studies of MVM supplementation and all-cause and cause-specific mortality, as well as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer incidence, to critically evaluate the current evidence on this topic. We included studies of generally healthy adult populations that evaluated multivitamin (the most commonly used dietary supplement) and/or multimineral supplement use or simultaneous use of 3 or more vitamins and minerals. We did not evaluate individual supplements. A total of 12 cohort studies and 3 primary prevention randomized controlled trials met our inclusion criteria. The majority of the studies were conducted in the United States (n = 11), and the remaining were conducted in European countries (n = 3) and Japan (n = 1). Although between-study methodological variation was present, most relative risks hovered closely around or slightly below the null value. No clear patterns of associations by study country, gender, smoking status, or frequency of use were observed. Based upon the available scientific evidence to date, supplementation with MVMs does not appear to increase all-cause mortality, cancer incidence or mortality, or CVD incidence or mortality and may provide a modest protective benefit.
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Exposure to UV radiation and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma: a pooled analysis.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 09-09-2013
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Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure has been inversely associated with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) risk, but only inconsistently, only in a few studies, and without attention to HL heterogeneity. We conducted a pooled analysis of HL risk focusing on type and timing of UVR exposure and on disease subtypes by age, histology, and tumor-cell Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status. Four case-control studies contributed 1320 HL cases and 6381 controls. We estimated lifetime, adulthood, and childhood UVR exposure and history of sunburn and sunlamp use. We used 2-stage estimation with mixed-effects models and weighted pooled effect estimates by inverse marginal variances. We observed statistically significant inverse associations with HL risk for UVR exposures during childhood and adulthood, sunburn history, and sunlamp use, but we found no significant dose-response relationships. Risks were significant only for EBV-positive HL (pooled odds ratio, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.35 to 0.91 for the highest overall UVR exposure category), with a significant linear trend for overall exposure (P = .03). Pooled relative risk estimates were not heterogeneous across studies. Increased UVR exposure may protect against HL, particularly EBV-positive HL. Plausible mechanisms involving UVR induction of regulatory T cells or the cellular DNA damage response suggest opportunities for new prevention targets.
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Treatment and Mortality in Men with Localized Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Study in California.
Open Prost Cancer J
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2013
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To provide patients and physicians with population-based estimates of mortality from prostate cancer or other causes depending upon the primary treatment modality, stratified by patient age, tumor stage and grade.
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How do social factors explain outcomes in non-small-cell lung cancer among Hispanics in California? Explaining the Hispanic paradox.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2013
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Hispanics in the United States have lower age-adjusted mortality resulting from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate individual, clinical, and neighborhood factors in survival among Hispanics with NSCLC.
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Serum IgA to Epstein-Barr virus Early Antigen-Diffuse identifies Hodgkins lymphoma.
J. Med. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2013
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Hodgkins lymphoma is associated with immune dysregulation. Immune impairment often results in aberrant immune responses and lytic reactivation of ubiquitous Herpesviruses, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in mucosal tissues. Accordingly, the specificity of IgA to EBV early lytic antigens, which are important for reactivation, was evaluated to determine Hodgkins lymphoma-specific sero-reactive patterns. Sera from 42 patients with Hodgkins lymphoma were compared to sera from 17 patients with infectious mononucleosis (IM), another EBV-related condition that often presents in a similar manner; and to sera from 15 healthy EBV-seropositive subjects. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that like IM sera, most Hodgkins lymphoma sera contained IgA that labeled cells expressing EBV early lytic antigens whereas healthy EBV-seropositive sera did not. Further evaluation to distinguish Hodgkins lymphoma from IM showed that IgA in most Hodgkins lymphoma, irrespective of the presence of EBV in primary tumors, detected only modified forms of EBV lytic Early Antigen-Diffuse (EA-D) while IM sera detected the un-modified form as well, further supporting the presence of immune dysregulation in Hodgkins lymphoma patients. This IgA pattern distinguished Hodgkins lymphoma from IM sera with a sensitivity of 92.9%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 85%. Our findings lay the groundwork for additional scientific and clinical investigation, particularly into the potential for developing Hodgkins lymphoma-associated diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. J. Med. Virol. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Cancer mortality and quantitative oil production in the Amazon region of Ecuador, 1990-2010.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2013
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Controversy persists over whether cancer risk is increased in communities surrounding oil fields, especially in the Oriente region of Ecuador. This ecologic study uses quantitative exposure data, updated mortality data, and improved statistical methods to study the impact of oil exploration and production activities on cancer mortality rates in the Oriente.
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Education and counseling of pregnant patients with chronic hepatitis B: perspectives from obstetricians and perinatal nurses in Santa Clara County, California.
Asian Pac. J. Cancer Prev.
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2013
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This study aimed to better understand the barriers to perinatal hepatitis B prevention and to identify the reasons for poor hepatitis B knowledge and delivery of education to hepatitis B surface-antigen- positive pregnant women among healthcare providers in Santa Clara County, California.
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Genome-wide association study identifies multiple risk loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
Sonja I Berndt, Christine F Skibola, Vijai Joseph, Nicola J Camp, Alexandra Nieters, Zhaoming Wang, Wendy Cozen, Alain Monnereau, Sophia S Wang, Rachel S Kelly, Qing Lan, Lauren R Teras, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Charles C Chung, Meredith Yeager, Angela R Brooks-Wilson, Patricia Hartge, Mark P Purdue, Brenda M Birmann, Bruce K Armstrong, Pierluigi Cocco, Yawei Zhang, Gianluca Severi, Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Charles Lawrence, Laurie Burdette, Jeffrey Yuenger, Amy Hutchinson, Kevin B Jacobs, Timothy G Call, Tait D Shanafelt, Anne J Novak, Neil E Kay, Mark Liebow, Alice H Wang, Karin E Smedby, Hans-Olov Adami, Mads Melbye, Bengt Glimelius, Ellen T Chang, Martha Glenn, Karen Curtin, Lisa A Cannon-Albright, Brandt Jones, W Ryan Diver, Brian K Link, George J Weiner, Lucia Conde, Paige M Bracci, Jacques Riby, Elizabeth A Holly, Martyn T Smith, Rebecca D Jackson, Lesley F Tinker, Yolanda Benavente, Nikolaus Becker, Paolo Boffetta, Paul Brennan, Lenka Foretova, Marc Maynadié, James McKay, Anthony Staines, Kari G Rabe, Sara J Achenbach, Celine M Vachon, Lynn R Goldin, Sara S Strom, Mark C Lanasa, Logan G Spector, Jose F Leis, Julie M Cunningham, J Brice Weinberg, Vicki A Morrison, Neil E Caporaso, Aaron D Norman, Martha S Linet, Anneclaire J De Roos, Lindsay M Morton, Richard K Severson, Elio Riboli, Paolo Vineis, Rudolph Kaaks, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Giovanna Masala, Elisabete Weiderpass, Maria-Dolores Chirlaque, Roel C H Vermeulen, Ruth C Travis, Graham G Giles, Demetrius Albanes, Jarmo Virtamo, Stephanie Weinstein, Jacqueline Clavel, Tongzhang Zheng, Theodore R Holford, Kenneth Offit, Andrew Zelenetz, Robert J Klein, John J Spinelli, Kimberly A Bertrand, Francine Laden, Edward Giovannucci, Peter Kraft, Anne Kricker, Jenny Turner, Claire M Vajdic, Maria Grazia Ennas, Giovanni M Ferri, Lucia Miligi, Liming Liang, Joshua Sampson, Simon Crouch, Ju-Hyun Park, Kari E North, Angela Cox, John A Snowden, Josh Wright, Angel Carracedo, Carlos Lopez-Otin, Sílvia Beà, Itziar Salaverria, David Martín-Garcia, Elias Campo, Joseph F Fraumeni, Silvia de Sanjosé, Henrik Hjalgrim, James R Cerhan, Stephen J Chanock, Nathaniel Rothman, Susan L Slager.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2013
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have previously identified 13 loci associated with risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL). To identify additional CLL susceptibility loci, we conducted the largest meta-analysis for CLL thus far, including four GWAS with a total of 3,100 individuals with CLL (cases) and 7,667 controls. In the meta-analysis, we identified ten independent associated SNPs in nine new loci at 10q23.31 (ACTA2 or FAS (ACTA2/FAS), P=1.22×10(-14)), 18q21.33 (BCL2, P=7.76×10(-11)), 11p15.5 (C11orf21, P=2.15×10(-10)), 4q25 (LEF1, P=4.24×10(-10)), 2q33.1 (CASP10 or CASP8 (CASP10/CASP8), P=2.50×10(-9)), 9p21.3 (CDKN2B-AS1, P=1.27×10(-8)), 18q21.32 (PMAIP1, P=2.51×10(-8)), 15q15.1 (BMF, P=2.71×10(-10)) and 2p22.2 (QPCT, P=1.68×10(-8)), as well as an independent signal at an established locus (2q13, ACOXL, P=2.08×10(-18)). We also found evidence for two additional promising loci below genome-wide significance at 8q22.3 (ODF1, P=5.40×10(-8)) and 5p15.33 (TERT, P=1.92×10(-7)). Although further studies are required, the proximity of several of these loci to genes involved in apoptosis suggests a plausible underlying biological mechanism.
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Anthropometric, behavioral, and female reproductive factors and risk of multiple myeloma: a pooled analysis.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 03-28-2013
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Risk of developing multiple myeloma (MM) rises with age and is greater among men and blacks than among women and whites, respectively, and possibly increased among obese persons. Other risk factors remain poorly understood. By pooling data from two complementary epidemiologic studies, we assessed whether obesity, smoking, or alcohol consumption alters MM risk and whether female reproductive history might explain the lower occurrence of MM in females than in males.
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Subtype of dietary fat in relation to risk of Hodgkin lymphoma: a population-based case-control study in Connecticut and Massachusetts.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2013
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Few epidemiological studies have examined the relationship between dietary fat, which may affect immune function and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that high dietary intake of fat and specific subtypes of fat is associated with the risk of HL among 486 HL cases and 630 population-based controls recruited between 1997 and 2000 in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) stratified by age and gender. Among younger adults, HL risk was significantly and positively associated with higher intake of saturated fat [ORs for increasing quartiles = 1.3, 1.8, and 2.1; p trend = 0.04] and negatively associated with higher intake of monounsaturated fat [ORs for increasing quartiles = 0.5, 0.5, and 0.4; p trend = 0.03), after adjustment for potential confounders including lifestyle and other dietary factors. The associations with saturated fat (ORs for increasing quartile = 2.4, 3.2, and 4.4; p trend < 0.01] and monounsaturated fat (ORs for increasing quartile = 0.3, 0.6, and 0.3; p trend = 0.04) were most apparent in younger women, whereas there was no significant association between intake of total fat or any type of fat and risk of HL in older females or younger or older males. These findings show that the associations between dietary fat and risk of HL may vary by gender and age and require confirmation in other populations.
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Racial patterns of extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, in California: a population-based study.
Br. J. Haematol.
PUBLISHED: 12-20-2011
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In order to investigate whether the clinical behaviour of extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) varies by race within a geographic region, we identified a total of 213 non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics and Asians/Pacific islanders (APIs) diagnosed with ENKTL in the California Cancer Registry between 2001 and 2008. The incidence and outcomes of the disease in these racial groups were analysed. The incidence rates in non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics and APIs were 0.05, 0.18 and 0.23 per 100,000 person-years, respectively, among males; and 0.03, 0.07 and 0.10 per 100,000 person-years, respectively, among females. The overall survival (OS) at 5 years was 28.6% in non-Hispanic whites, 30.4% in Hispanic, and 24.0% in APIs. In multivariate analysis, distant versus local/regional disease (Hazard Ratio [HR]=2.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.36, 2.96), initial treatment with chemotherapy plus radiotherapy (HR=0.39, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.70) or radiotherapy alone (HR=0.48, 95% CI: 0.23, 0.99) versus no therapy were associated with OS. However, OS was not affected by age, sex, race, chemotherapy alone, socioeconomic status, or human immunodeficiency virus infection. In conclusion, ENKTL is more common and clinically more similar among Hispanics and APIs than non-Hispanic whites with poor outcome in all racial groups.
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San Francisco hep B free: a grassroots community coalition to prevent hepatitis B and liver cancer.
J Community Health
PUBLISHED: 11-16-2011
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Chronic hepatitis B is the leading cause of liver cancer and the largest health disparity between Asian/Pacific Islanders (APIs) and the general US population. The Hep B Free model was launched to eliminate hepatitis B infection by increasing hepatitis B awareness, testing, vaccination, and treatment among APIs by building a broad, community-wide coalition. The San Francisco Hep B Free campaign is a diverse public/private collaboration unifying the API community, health care system, policy makers, businesses, and the general public in San Francisco, California. Mass-media and grassroots messaging raised citywide awareness of hepatitis B and promoted use of the existing health care system for hepatitis B screening and follow-up. Coalition partners reported semi-annually on activities, resources utilized, and system changes instituted. From 2007 to 2009, over 150 organizations contributed approximately $1,000,000 in resources to the San Francisco Hep B Free campaign. 40 educational events reached 1,100 healthcare providers, and 50% of primary care physicians pledged to screen APIs routinely for hepatitis B. Community events and fairs reached over 200,000 members of the general public. Of 3,315 API clients tested at stand-alone screening sites created by the campaign, 6.5% were found to be chronically infected and referred to follow-up care. A grassroots coalition that develops strong partnerships with diverse organizations can use existing resources to successfully increase public and healthcare provider awareness about hepatitis B among APIs, promote routine hepatitis B testing and vaccination as part of standard primary care, and ensure access to treatment for chronically infected individuals.
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Nutrients and genetic variation involved in one-carbon metabolism and Hodgkin lymphoma risk: a population-based case-control study.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2011
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Nutritional and genetic determinants of the one-carbon metabolism pathway have been related to risk of malignant lymphomas, but little is known about their associations with Hodgkin lymphoma risk specifically. The authors examined nutrient intake (folate, vitamin B(2), vitamin B(6), vitamin B(12), methionine) and multivitamin use among 497 Hodgkin lymphoma patients and 638 population-based controls (Massachusetts and Connecticut, 1997-2000), and genetic variation (MTHFR 677C>T, MTHFR 1298A>C, MTR 2756A>G, SHMT1 1420C>T, TYMS 1494del6) and gene-diet interactions in a subset. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate multivariable odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Hodgkin lymphoma risk was not associated with total nutrient intake or intake from food alone (excluding supplements). Multivitamin use (odds ratio (OR) = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.96), total vitamin B(6) (OR(quartile 4 vs. 1) = 1.62) (P(trend) = 0.03), and total vitamin B(12) (OR(quartile 4 vs. 1) = 1.75) (P(trend) = 0.02) intakes were positively associated with risk of Epstein-Barr virus-negative, but not -positive, disease. The 5 genetic variants were not significantly associated with Hodgkin lymphoma risk; no significant gene-diet interactions were observed after Bonferroni correction. Study findings do not support a strong role for nutrients and genetic variation in the one-carbon metabolism pathway in susceptibility to Hodgkin lymphoma. Associations between diet and risk of Epstein-Barr virus-negative disease require confirmation in other populations.
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Sunlight exposure, vitamin D, and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the Nurses Health Study.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2011
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Case-control studies suggest increased sun exposure reduces non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) risk. Evidence from prospective cohort studies, however, is limited and inconsistent. We evaluated the association between ambient ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure and NHL in a nationwide cohort of women, the Nurses Health Study (NHS).
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Cigarette smoking, passive smoking, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk: evidence from the California Teachers Study.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2011
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Epidemiologic studies conducted to date have shown evidence of a causal relation between smoking and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) risk. However, previous studies did not account for passive smoking exposure in the never-smoking reference group. The California Teachers Study collected information about lifetime smoking and household passive smoking exposure in 1995 and about lifetime exposure to passive smoking in 3 settings (household, workplace, and social settings) in 1997-1998. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by fitting Cox proportional hazards models with follow-up through 2007. Compared with never smokers, ever smokers had a 1.11-fold (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 1.30) higher NHL risk that increased to a 1.22-fold (95% CI: 0.95, 1.57) higher risk when women with household passive smoking were excluded from the reference category. Statistically significant dose responses were observed for lifetime cumulative smoking exposure (intensity and pack-years; both P s for trend = 0.02) when women with household passive smoking were excluded from the reference category. Among never smokers, NHL risk increased with increasing lifetime exposure to passive smoking (relative risk = 1.51 (95% CI: 1.03, 2.22) for >40 years vs. ?5 years of passive smoking; P for trend = 0.03), particularly for follicular lymphoma (relative risk = 2.89 (95% CI: 1.23, 6.80); P for trend = 0.01). The present study provides evidence that smoking and passive smoking may influence NHL etiology, particularly for follicular lymphoma.
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Long-term exposure to air pollution and cardiorespiratory disease in the California teachers study cohort.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2011
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Several studies have linked long-term exposure to particulate air pollution with increased cardiopulmonary mortality; only two have also examined incident circulatory disease.
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Age-specific effects of hormone therapy use on overall mortality and ischemic heart disease mortality among women in the California Teachers Study.
Menopause
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2011
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Although the Womens Health Initiative trial suggested that menopausal hormone therapy (HT) does not reduce coronary heart disease mortality overall, subsequent results have suggested that there may be a benefit in younger women. The California Teachers Study questionnaire and mortality data were used to examine whether age modified the association between HT and the relative risk of overall mortality and ischemic heart disease deaths.
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Adulthood residential ultraviolet radiation, sun sensitivity, dietary vitamin D, and risk of lymphoid malignancies in the California Teachers Study.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2011
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To lend clarity to inconsistent prior findings of an inverse association between ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and risk of lymphoid malignancies, we examined the association of prospectively ascertained residential ambient UVR exposure with risk of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs), multiple myeloma (MM), and classical Hodgkin lymphoma in the California Teachers Study cohort. Among 121 216 eligible women, 629 were diagnosed with NHL, 119 with MM, and 38 with Hodgkin lymphoma between 1995-1996 and 2007. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Residential UVR levels within a 20-km radius were associated with reduced risk of overall NHL (RR for highest vs lowest statewide quartile of minimum UVR [? 5100 vs < 4915 W-h/m(2)], 0.58; 95% CI, 0.42-0.80), especially diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (RR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.17-0.78) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (RR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.21-1.01), and MM (RR for maximum UVR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.36-0.90). These associations were not modified by skin sensitivity to sunlight, race/ethnicity, body mass index, or neighborhood socioeconomic status. Dietary vitamin D also was not associated with risk of lymphoid malignancies. These results support a protective effect of routine residential UVR exposure against lymphomagenesis through mechanisms possibly independent of vitamin D.
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Lymphoid malignancies in U.S. Asians: incidence rate differences by birthplace and acculturation.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2011
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Malignancies of the lymphoid cells, including non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), HL, and multiple myeloma, occur at much lower rates in Asians than other racial/ethnic groups in the United States. It remains unclear whether these deficits are explained by genetic or environmental factors. To better understand environmental contributions, we examined incidence patterns of lymphoid malignancies among populations characterized by ethnicity, birthplace, and residential neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and ethnic enclave status.
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Establishment of VCA and EBNA1 IgA-based combination by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as preferred screening method for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a two-stage design with a preliminary performance study and a mass screening in southern China.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-28-2011
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A two-stage study was conducted in southern China to determine and validate an optimal combination of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related seromarkers for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) screening. In the first stage, six seromarkers [VCA-IgA, EA-IgA, Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1-IgA), EBNA1-IgG, Zta-IgA and Rta-IgG] were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and two traditional NPC screening seromarkers (VCA-IgA and EA-IgA) were detected by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) in serum samples from 191 NPC patients and 337 controls. An optimal combination of seromarkers for NPC diagnosis was selected using logistic regression models. Results showed that the diagnostic performances of VCA-IgA and EA-IgA tested by ELISA were superior to the performances of the same seromarkers by IFA. VCA-IgA combined with EBNA1-IgA by ELISA was identified as the optimal combination, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) up to 0.97, a sensitivity of 95.3% and a specificity of 94.1% for classification of NPCs vs. controls. In the second stage, 5,481 participants aged 30-59 years and without clinical evidence of NPC were recruited into a population-based NPC screening program from May 2008 to February 2009 in Sihui City, China. Their sera were tested simultaneously by both the new and the traditional screening schemes and eight early stage NPC patients were subsequently histopathologically confirmed. The traditional and the new screening schemes had comparable specificity (estimated as 98.5%), but the sensitivity of the new scheme (75.0%) was significantly higher than that of the traditional one (25.0%). The combination of VCA-IgA and EBNA1-IgA by ELISA outperforms the traditional NPC screening scheme and could become the preferred serodiagnostic strategy for NPC screening in high-incidence areas.
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Nativity and papillary thyroid cancer incidence rates among Hispanic women in California.
Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-28-2011
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Overall, the incidence of papillary thyroid cancer in Hispanic women residing in the United States (US) is similar to that of non-Hispanic white women. However, little is known as to whether rates in Hispanic women vary by nativity, which may influence exposure to important risk factors.
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GWAS of follicular lymphoma reveals allelic heterogeneity at 6p21.32 and suggests shared genetic susceptibility with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2011
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Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) represents a diverse group of hematological malignancies, of which follicular lymphoma (FL) is a prevalent subtype. A previous genome-wide association study has established a marker, rs10484561 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II region on 6p21.32 associated with increased FL risk. Here, in a three-stage genome-wide association study, starting with a genome-wide scan of 379 FL cases and 791 controls followed by validation in 1,049 cases and 5,790 controls, we identified a second independent FL-associated locus on 6p21.32, rs2647012 (OR(combined)? = 0.64, P(combined)? = 2 × 10(-21)) located 962 bp away from rs10484561 (r(2)<0.1 in controls). After mutual adjustment, the associations at the two SNPs remained genome-wide significant (rs2647012:OR(adjusted) ?= 0.70, P(adjusted)? =? 4 × 10(-12); rs10484561:OR(adjusted) ?= 1.64, P(adjusted) ?= 5 × 10(-15)). Haplotype and coalescence analyses indicated that rs2647012 arose on an evolutionarily distinct haplotype from that of rs10484561 and tags a novel allele with an opposite (protective) effect on FL risk. Moreover, in a follow-up analysis of the top 6 FL-associated SNPs in 4,449 cases of other NHL subtypes, rs10484561 was associated with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (OR(combined) ?= 1.36, P(combined)? =? 1.4 × 10(-7)). Our results reveal the presence of allelic heterogeneity within the HLA class II region influencing FL susceptibility and indicate a possible shared genetic etiology with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. These findings suggest that the HLA class II region plays a complex yet important role in NHL.
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Geographical and ethnic distribution of the HBV C/D recombinant on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2011
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Two forms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) C/D recombinant have been identified in western China, but little is known about their geographical and ethnic distributions, and particularly the clinical significance and specific mutations in the pre-core region. To address these questions, a total of 624 chronic HBV carriers from four ethnic populations representing five provinces in western China were enrolled in this study. Genotypes were firstly determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism, and then confirmed by full or partial genome nucleotide sequencing. The distribution of HBV genotypes was as follows: HBV/B: 40 (6.4%); HBV/C: 221 (35.4%); HBV/D: 39 (6.3%); HBV/CD: 324 (51.9%). In the 324 HBV C/D recombinant infections, 244 (75.3%) were infected with the "CD1" and 80 (24.7%) were infected with the "CD2." The distribution of HBV genotypes exhibited distinct patterns in different regions and ethnic populations. Geographically, the C/D recombinant was the most prevalent HBV strain on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Ethnically, the C/D recombinant had a higher prevalence in Tibetan patients than in other populations. Clinically, patients with HBV/CD1 showed significantly lower levels of serum total bilirubin than patients with HBV/C2. The prevalence of HBeAg was comparable between patients with HBV/CD1 and HBV/C2 (63.3% vs 50.0%, P?=?0.118) whether patients were taken together or stratified by age into three groups (65.6% vs 58.8% in <30 years, P?=?0.758; 61.9% vs 48.0% in 30-50 years, P?=?0.244; 64.3% vs 33.3%, P?=?0.336). Virologically HBV/CD1 had a significantly lower frequency of G1896A than HBV/C2. In conclusion, the HBV C/D recombinant is restricted to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in western China and is found predominantly in Tibetans. The predominance of the premature pre-core stop mutation G1896A in patients with the HBV C/D recombinant may account for the higher prevalence of HBeAg in these patients.
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A model program for hepatitis B vaccination and education of schoolchildren in rural China.
Int J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2011
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Incomplete hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine coverage and poor HBV-related knowledge in China leave millions of children unprotected from this life-threatening infection. To address these gaps, a pilot program for HBV education and vaccination was launched in rural China.
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Survival following non-small cell lung cancer among Asian/Pacific Islander, Latina, and Non-Hispanic white women who have never smoked.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2011
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Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among U.S. Asian/Pacific Islander (API) and Latina women despite low smoking prevalence. This study examined survival patterns following non-small cell lung cancer in a population-based sample of lung cancer cases from the San Francisco Bay Area Lung Cancer Study (SFBALCS).
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Papillary thyroid cancer incidence rates vary significantly by birthplace in Asian American women.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2011
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To investigate how birthplace influences the incidence of papillary thyroid cancer among Asian American women.
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Vitamin D receptor genotypes, ultraviolet radiation exposure, and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-12-2010
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Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure may influence risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) through vitamin D, with antineoplastic effects mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). To explore the role of vitamin D in NHL risk and the potential interaction with UVR, the authors genotyped 10 VDR polymorphisms in 2,448 NHL patients and 1,981 controls from Denmark and Sweden who were recruited in 1999-2002. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed with logistic regression. P values were 2-sided. Most VDR variants (e.g., rs731236/TaqI, rs15444410/BsmI) were not associated with overall risk of NHL, but there was some evidence of a positive association between rs4760655 and follicular lymphoma risk (nominal P(trend) = 0.004, corrected P(trend) = 0.24). There was no support for an effect of interaction between VDR variants and UVR exposure on risk of overall NHL or B-cell lymphoma subtypes. However, there was some evidence that rs731236 altered associations between UVR and T-cell NHL risk; while increasing UVR frequency lowered T-cell NHL risk among rs731236 TT carriers, an elevated risk was observed among rs731236 CC carriers (nominal P(interaction) ? 0.008, corrected P(interaction) ? 0.12). VDR does not appear to harbor major determinants of NHL risk, except perhaps for follicular lymphoma. Possible heterogeneity in effects of UVR exposure on T-cell lymphoma risk by VDR rs731236 genotype merits further investigation.
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Alcohol consumption over time and risk of lymphoid malignancies in the California Teachers Study cohort.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2010
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Several previous studies found inverse associations between alcohol consumption and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma. However, most studies were retrospective, and few distinguished former drinkers or infrequent drinkers from consistent nondrinkers. Therefore, the authors investigated whether history of alcohol drinking affected risks of NHL and multiple myeloma among 102,721 eligible women in the California Teachers Study, a prospective cohort study in which 496 women were diagnosed with B-cell NHL and 101 were diagnosed with multiple myeloma between 1995-1996 and December 31, 2007. Incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Risk of all types of B-cell NHL combined or multiple myeloma was not associated with self-reported past consumption of alcohol, beer, wine, or liquor at ages 18-22 years, at ages 30-35 years, or during the year before baseline. NHL subtypes were inconsistently associated with alcohol intake. However, women who were former alcohol drinkers at baseline were at elevated risk of overall B-cell NHL (rate ratio = 1.46, 95% confidence interval: 1.08, 1.97) and follicular lymphoma (rate ratio = 1.81, 95% confidence interval: 1.00, 3.28). The higher risk among former drinkers emphasizes the importance of classifying both current and past alcohol consumption and suggests that factors related to quitting drinking, rather than alcohol itself, may increase B-cell NHL risk.
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Disparities in liver cancer incidence by nativity, acculturation, and socioeconomic status in California Hispanics and Asians.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 10-12-2010
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Asians and Hispanics have the highest incidence rates of liver cancer in the United States, but little is known about how incidence patterns in these largely immigrant populations vary by nativity, acculturation, and socioeconomic status (SES). Such variations can identify high-priority subgroups for prevention and monitoring.
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Dietary phytocompounds and risk of lymphoid malignancies in the California Teachers Study cohort.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2010
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We examined whether dietary intake of isoflavones, lignans, isothiocyanates, antioxidants, or specific foods rich in these compounds is associated with reduced risk of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), multiple myeloma (MM), or Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) in a large, prospective cohort of women.
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Head and neck cancer-specific survival based on socioeconomic status in Asians and Pacific Islanders.
Cancer
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2010
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Lower socioeconomic status (SES) has been linked to higher incidence of head and neck cancer (HNC) and lower survival. However, little is known about the effect of SES on HNC survival in Asians and Pacific Islanders (APIs). This studys purpose was to examine the effect of SES on disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) in APIs with HNC using population-based data.
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A prospective study of Epstein-Barr virus antibodies and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2010
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Severe immunosuppression is an established risk factor for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but an association with subclinical immune dysfunction is unclear. We conducted a case-control study nested in the Physicians Health Study and the Nurses Health Study cohorts to determine whether patterns of antibody response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) were associated with NHL risk. We measured antibody titers against viral capsid antigen, early antigen, and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA-1 and EBNA-2) in blood samples collected before diagnosis from 340 cases and 662 matched controls. Using conditional logistic regression, we estimated rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for elevated versus normal titers and the ratio of anti-EBNA-1 to anti-EBNA-2 titers (? 1.0 vs > 1.0). We found no association between EBV serostatus, elevated titers, or an EBNA-1/EBNA-2 ratio ? 1.0 and NHL risk overall. For chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, suggestive associations were noted for elevated anti-EBNA-2 (RR, 1.74; 95% CI, 0.99-3.05), anti-viral capsid antigen (RR, 1.58; 95% CI, 0.79-3.14), and EBNA-1/EBNA-2 ratio ? 1.0 (RR, 1.52; 95% CI, 0.91-2.55). There was no evidence of heterogeneity by subtype. Overall, we found no evidence that EBV antibody profile predicts NHL risk in immunocompetent persons, with the possible exception of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma.
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Oral contraceptives, menopausal hormone therapy use and risk of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the California Teachers Study.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 07-05-2010
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We examined oral contraceptive (OC) and menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) use in relation to risk of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Women under age 85 years participating in the California Teachers Study with no history of hematopoietic cancer were followed from 1995 through 2007. A total of 516 of 114,131 women eligible for OC use analysis and 402 of 54,758 postmenopausal women eligible for MHT use analysis developed B-cell NHL. Multivariable adjusted and age stratified Cox proportional hazards models were fit to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Ever versus never OC use was marginally associated with lower B-cell NHL risk, particularly among women first using OCs before age 25 years (RR=0.72, 95% CI=0.51-0.99); yet, no duration-response effect was observed. No association was observed for ever versus never MHT use among postmenopausal women (RR=1.05, 95% CI=0.83-1.33) overall or by formulation (estrogen alone, ET, or estrogen plus progestin, EPT). Among women with no MHT use, having bilateral oophorectomy plus hysterectomy was associated with greater B-cell NHL risk than having natural menopause (RR=3.15, 95% CI=1.62-6.13). Bilateral oophorectomy plus hysterectomy was not associated with risk among women who used ET or EPT. These results indicate that exogenous hormone use does not strongly influence B-cell NHL risk.
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A genome-wide association study of Hodgkins lymphoma identifies new susceptibility loci at 2p16.1 (REL), 8q24.21 and 10p14 (GATA3).
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2010
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To identify susceptibility loci for classical Hodgkins lymphoma (cHL), we conducted a genome-wide association study of 589 individuals with cHL (cases) and 5,199 controls with validation in four independent samples totaling 2,057 cases and 3,416 controls. We identified three new susceptibility loci at 2p16.1 (rs1432295, REL, odds ratio (OR) = 1.22, combined P = 1.91 × 10(-8)), 8q24.21 (rs2019960, PVT1, OR = 1.33, combined P = 1.26 × 10(-13)) and 10p14 (rs501764, GATA3, OR = 1.25, combined P = 7.05 × 10(-8)). Furthermore, we confirmed the role of the major histocompatibility complex in disease etiology by revealing a strong human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association (rs6903608, OR = 1.70, combined P = 2.84 × 10(-50)). These data provide new insight into the pathogenesis of cHL.
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Lower respiratory tract infection in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) infected with group A Streptococcus.
Microb. Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2010
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Group A Streptococcus (GAS), a human-specific pathogen, is best known for causing pharyngitis ("strep-throat") and necrotizing fasciitis ("flesh-eating disease"). However, the organism is also an uncommon but important cause of community-acquired bronchopneumonia, an infection with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Inasmuch as little is known about the molecular pathogenesis of GAS lower respiratory tract infection, we sought to develop a relevant human infection model. Nine cynomolgus macaques were infected by intra-bronchial instillation of either sterile saline or GAS (10(5) or 10(7) CFU). Animals were continuously monitored and sacrificed at five days post-inoculation. Serial bronchial alveolar lavage specimens and tissues collected at necropsy were used for histologic and immunohistochemical examination, quantitative microbial culture, lung and blood biomarker analysis, and in vivo GAS gene expression studies. The lower respiratory tract disease observed in cynomolgus macaques mimicked the clinical and pathological features of severe GAS bronchopneumonia in humans. This new monkey model will be useful for testing hypotheses bearing on the molecular pathogenesis of GAS in the lower respiratory tract.
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Parents ages at birth and risk of adult-onset hematologic malignancies among female teachers in California.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2010
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Although advanced parental age at ones birth has been associated with increased risk of breast and prostate cancers, few studies have examined its effect on adult-onset sporadic hematologic malignancies. The authors examined the association of parents ages at womens births with risk of hematologic malignancies among 110,999 eligible women aged 22-84 years recruited into the prospective California Teachers Study. Between 1995 and 2007, 819 women without a family history of hematologic malignancies were diagnosed with incident lymphoma, leukemia (primarily acute myeloid leukemia), or multiple myeloma. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models provided estimates of relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. Paternal age was positively associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma after adjustment for race and birth order (relative risk for age > or =40 vs. <25 years = 1.51, 95% confidence interval: 1.08, 2.13; P-trend = 0.01). Further adjustment for maternal age did not materially alter the association. By contrast, the elevated non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk associated with advanced maternal age (> or =40 years) became null when paternal age was included in the statistical model. No association was observed for acute myeloid leukemia or multiple myeloma. Advanced paternal age may play a role in non-Hodgkin lymphoma etiology. Potential etiologic mechanisms include de novo gene mutations, aberrant paternal gene imprinting, or telomere/telomerase biology.
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Asian ethnicity and breast cancer subtypes: a study from the California Cancer Registry.
Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2010
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The distribution of breast cancer molecular subtypes has been shown to vary by race/ethnicity, highlighting the importance of host factors in breast tumor biology. We undertook the current analysis to determine population-based distributions of breast cancer subtypes among six ethnic Asian groups in California. We defined immunohistochemical (IHC) surrogates for each breast cancer subtype among Chinese, Japanese, Filipina, Korean, Vietnamese, and South Asian patients diagnosed with incident, primary, invasive breast cancer between 2002 and 2007 in the California Cancer Registry as: hormone receptor-positive (HR+)/HER2- [estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and/or progesterone receptor-positive (PR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-)], triple-negative (ER-, PR-, and HER2-), and HER2-positive (ER±, PR±, and HER2+). We calculated frequencies of breast cancer subtypes among Asian ethnic groups and evaluated their associations with clinical and demographic factors. Complete IHC data were available for 8,140 Asian women. Compared to non-Hispanic White women, Korean [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5-2.2], Filipina (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.2-1.5), Vietnamese (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1-1.6), and Chinese (OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.0-1.3) women had a significantly increased risk of being diagnosed with HER2-positive breast cancer subtypes after adjusting for age, stage, grade, socioeconomic status, histology, diagnosis year, nativity, and hospital ownership status. We report a significant ethnic disparity in HER2-positive breast cancer in a large population-based cohort enriched for Asian-Americans. Given the poor prognosis and high treatment costs of HER2-positive breast cancer, our results have implications for healthcare resource utilization, cancer biology, and clinical care.
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Body size and the risk of endometrial cancer by hormone therapy use in postmenopausal women in the California Teachers Study cohort.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2010
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To investigate whether hormone therapy (HT) and obesity are associated with endometrial cancer risk among postmenopausal women in the California Teachers Study cohort.
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Genome-wide association study of follicular lymphoma identifies a risk locus at 6p21.32.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2010
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To identify susceptibility loci for non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes, we conducted a three-stage genome-wide association study. We identified two variants associated with follicular lymphoma at 6p21.32 (rs10484561, combined P = 1.12 x 10(-29) and rs7755224, combined P = 2.00 x 10(-19); r(2) = 1.0), supporting the idea that major histocompatibility complex genetic variation influences follicular lymphoma susceptibility. We also found confirmatory evidence of a previously reported association between chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma and rs735665 (combined P = 4.24 x 10(-9)).
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Crossveinless-2 is required for the relocalization of Chordin protein within the vertebral field in mouse embryos.
Dev. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2010
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Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), as well as the BMP-binding molecules Chordin (Chd), Crossveinless-2 (CV2) and Twisted Gastrulation (Tsg), are essential for axial skeletal development in the mouse embryo. We previously reported a strong genetic interaction between CV2 and Tsg and proposed a role for this interaction in the shaping of the BMP morphogenetic field during vertebral development. In the present study we investigated the roles of CV2 and Chd in the formation of the vertebral morphogenetic field. We performed immunostainings for CV2 and Chd protein on wild-type, CV2(-/-) or Chd(-/-) mouse embryo sections at the stage of onset of the vertebral phenotypes. By comparing mRNA and protein localizations we found that CV2 does not diffuse away from its place of synthesis, the vertebral body. The most interesting finding of this study was that Chd synthesized in the intervertebral disc accumulates in the vertebral body. This relocalization does not take place in CV2(-/-) mutants. Instead, Chd was found to accumulate at its site of synthesis in CV2(-/-) embryos. These results indicate a CV2-dependent flow of Chd protein from the intervertebral disc to the vertebral body. Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation was decreased in CV2(-/-)vertebral bodies. This impaired BMP signaling may result from the decreased levels of Chd/BMP complexes diffusing from the intervertebral region. The data indicate a role for CV2 and Chd in the establishment of the vertebral morphogenetic field through the long-range relocalization of Chd/BMP complexes. The results may have general implications for the formation of embryonic organ-forming morphogenetic fields.
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Body size and the risk of ovarian cancer by hormone therapy use in the California Teachers Study cohort.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2010
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To investigate whether obesity and hormone therapy (HT) are associated with ovarian cancer risk among women in the California Teachers Study cohort.
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HLA-A alleles and infectious mononucleosis suggest a critical role for cytotoxic T-cell response in EBV-related Hodgkin lymphoma.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2010
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A proportion of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is believed to be causally related to infection with the ubiquitous lymphotropic EBV. The determining factors for development of EBV-related HL remain poorly understood, but likely involve immunological control of the viral infection. Accordingly, markers of the HLA class I region have been associated with risk of EBV-related HL. To study the host genetic component of EBV-related HL further, we investigated the lymphomas association with HLA-A*01 and HLA-A*02 simultaneously in the setting of infectious mononucleosis (IM), a risk factor for EBV-related HL, in a case-series analysis including 278 EBV-related and 656 EBV-unrelated cases of HL. By logistic regression, HLA-A*01 alleles [odds ratio (OR) per allele, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.60-2.88] were associated with increased and HLA-A*02 alleles (OR per allele, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.51-0.97) with decreased risk of EBV-related HL. These allele-specific associations corresponded to nearly 10-fold variation in risk of EBV-related HL between HLA-A*01 and HLA-A*02 homozygotes. History of IM was also associated with risk of EBV-related HL (OR, 3.40; 95% CI, 1.74-6.66). The association between history of IM and EBV-related HL was not seen in the presence of HLA-A*02 because this allele appeared to neutralize the effect of IM on EBV-related HL risk. Our findings suggest that HLA class I-restricted EBV-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses and events in the early immune response to EBV infection in IM play critical roles in the pathogenesis of EBV-related HL.
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Disparities in breast cancer survival among Asian women by ethnicity and immigrant status: a population-based study.
Am J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2010
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We investigated heterogeneity in ethnic composition and immigrant status among US Asians as an explanation for disparities in breast cancer survival.
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Hepatitis B and liver cancer knowledge and practices among healthcare and public health professionals in China: a cross-sectional study.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2010
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Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause of liver disease and liver cancer and a major source of health-related discrimination in China. To better target HBV detection and prevention programs, it is necessary to assess existing HBV knowledge, educational resources, reporting, and preventive practices, particularly among those health professionals who would be responsible for implementing such programs.
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Hidden breast cancer disparities in Asian women: disaggregating incidence rates by ethnicity and migrant status.
Am J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2010
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We estimated trends in breast cancer incidence rates for specific Asian populations in California to determine if disparities exist by immigrant status and age.
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Higher incidence of head and neck cancers among Vietnamese American men in California.
Head Neck
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2010
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Our aim was to determine the incidence rates of head and neck cancer in Vietnamese Californians compared with other Asian and non-Asian Californians.
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Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in relation to Hodgkin lymphoma risk in northern Denmark.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2010
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There are few known modifiable risk factors for Hodgkin lymphoma, but the recent finding of an inverse association between routine regular-strength aspirin use and Hodgkin lymphoma risk suggests that aspirin may protect against Hodgkin lymphoma development. To further investigate this association using prospectively collected data, we conducted a population-based case-control study in northern Denmark. A total of 478 incident Hodgkin lymphoma cases were identified in nationwide health-care databases from 1991 to 2008. Ten population controls were matched to each case on age, sex, and county using risk-set sampling. Use of aspirin, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) from 1989 to 2007 was ascertained by linkage to a population-based prescription database. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios for associations between medication use and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for ever use (>2 prescriptions) compared with never/rare use (< or =2 prescriptions) of low-dose aspirin was 0.7 (0.5-1.2). The association with low-dose aspirin use did not vary appreciably by recentness, duration, or intensity of use. Recent use (>2 prescriptions in the 1-2 years before the index date), short-term use (<7 years), and medium/high-intensity use (> or =25% of duration of use covered by prescription) of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors or other NSAIDs was associated with increased Hodgkin lymphoma risk possibly due to prodromal symptoms among cases. In conclusion, our results provide some evidence of a protective effect of low-dose aspirin, but not other NSAIDs, against Hodgkin lymphoma development.
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Past recreational physical activity, body size, and all-cause mortality following breast cancer diagnosis: results from the Breast Cancer Family Registry.
Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2010
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Few studies have considered the joint association of body mass index (BMI) and physical activity, two modifiable factors, with all-cause mortality after breast cancer diagnosis. Women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer (n = 4,153) between 1991 and 2000 were enrolled in the Breast Cancer Family Registry through population-based sampling in Northern California, USA; Ontario, Canada; and Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. During a median follow-up of 7.8 years, 725 deaths occurred. Baseline questionnaires assessed moderate and vigorous recreational physical activity and BMI prior to diagnosis. Associations with all-cause mortality were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for established prognostic factors. Compared with no physical activity, any recreational activity during the 3 years prior to diagnosis was associated with a 34% lower risk of death [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.51-0.85] for women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors, but not those with ER-negative tumors; this association did not appear to differ by race/ethnicity or BMI. Lifetime physical activity was not associated with all-cause mortality. BMI was positively associated with all-cause mortality for women diagnosed at age > or =50 years with ER-positive tumors (compared with normal-weight women, HR for overweight = 1.39, 95% CI: 0.90-2.15; HR for obese = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.11-2.82). BMI associations did not appear to differ by race/ethnicity. Our findings suggest that physical activity and BMI exert independent effects on overall mortality after breast cancer.
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Genetic variation in chromosomal translocation breakpoint and immune function genes and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2010
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Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 10 (IL10) are promising candidate susceptibility genes for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Chromosomal translocation breakpoint genes are of interest, given their documented involvement in lymphoma progression.
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Racial and social class gradients in life expectancy in contemporary California.
Soc Sci Med
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2010
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Life expectancy, or the estimated average age of death, is among the most basic measures of a populations health. However, monitoring differences in life expectancy among sociodemographically defined populations has been challenging, at least in the United States (US), because death certification does not include collection of markers of socioeconomic status (SES). In order to understand how SES and race/ethnicity independently and jointly affected overall health in a contemporary US population, we assigned a small-area-based measure of SES to all 689,036 deaths occurring in California during a three-year period (1999-2001) overlapping the most recent US census. Residence at death was geocoded to the smallest census area available (block group) and assigned to a quintile of a multifactorial SES index. We constructed life tables using mortality rates calculated by age, sex, race/ethnicity and neighborhood SES quintile, and produced corresponding life expectancy estimates. We found a 19.6 (+/-0.6) year gap in life expectancy between the sociodemographic groups with the longest life expectancy (highest SES quintile of Asian females; 84.9 years) and the shortest (lowest SES quintile of African-American males; 65.3 years). A positive SES gradient in life expectancy was observed among whites and African-Americans but not Hispanics or Asians. Age-specific mortality disparities varied among groups. Race/ethnicity and neighborhood SES had substantial and independent influences on life expectancy, underscoring the importance of monitoring health outcomes simultaneously by these factors. African-American males living in the poorest 20% of California neighborhoods had life expectancy comparable to that reported for males living in developing countries. Neighborhood SES represents a readily-available metric for ongoing surveillance of health disparities in the US.
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Decreased necrotizing fasciitis capacity caused by a single nucleotide mutation that alters a multiple gene virulence axis.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2010
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Single-nucleotide changes are the most common cause of natural genetic variation among members of the same species, but there is remarkably little information bearing on how they alter bacterial virulence. We recently discovered a single-nucleotide mutation in the group A Streptococcus genome that is epidemiologically associated with decreased human necrotizing fasciitis ("flesh-eating disease"). Working from this clinical observation, we find that wild-type mtsR function is required for group A Streptococcus to cause necrotizing fasciitis in mice and nonhuman primates. Expression microarray analysis revealed that mtsR inactivation results in overexpression of PrsA, a chaperonin involved in posttranslational maturation of SpeB, an extracellular cysteine protease. Isogenic mutant strains that overexpress prsA or lack speB had decreased secreted protease activity in vivo and recapitulated the necrotizing fasciitis-negative phenotype of the DeltamtsR mutant strain in mice and monkeys. mtsR inactivation results in increased PrsA expression, which in turn causes decreased SpeB secreted protease activity and reduced necrotizing fasciitis capacity. Thus, a naturally occurring single-nucleotide mutation dramatically alters virulence by dysregulating a multiple gene virulence axis. Our discovery has broad implications for the confluence of population genomics and molecular pathogenesis research.
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Family history of breast cancer and all-cause mortality after breast cancer diagnosis in the Breast Cancer Family Registry.
Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
PUBLISHED: 11-18-2009
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Although having a family history of breast cancer is a well established breast cancer risk factor, it is not known whether it influences mortality after breast cancer diagnosis. We studied 4,153 women with first primary incident invasive breast cancer diagnosed between 1991 and 2000, and enrolled in the Breast Cancer Family Registry through population-based sampling in Northern California, USA; Ontario, Canada; and Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. Cases were oversampled for younger age at diagnosis and/or family history of breast cancer. Carriers of germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 were excluded. Cases and their relatives completed structured questionnaires assessing breast cancer risk factors and family history of cancer. Cases were followed for a median of 6.5 years, during which 725 deaths occurred. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to evaluate associations between family history of breast cancer at the time of diagnosis and risk of all-cause mortality after breast cancer diagnosis, adjusting for established prognostic factors. The hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.84-1.15) for having at least one first- or second-degree relative with breast cancer, and 0.85 (95% CI = 0.70-1.02) for having at least one first-degree relative with breast cancer, compared with having no such family history. Estimates did not vary appreciably when stratified by case or tumor characteristics. In conclusion, family history of breast cancer is not associated with all-cause mortality after breast cancer diagnosis for women without a known germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Therefore, clinical management should not depend on family history of breast cancer.
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Long-term and recent recreational physical activity and survival after breast cancer: the California Teachers Study.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 10-20-2009
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Long-term physical activity is associated with lower breast cancer risk. Little information exists on its association with subsequent survival.
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Body size, recreational physical activity, and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk among women in the California teachers study.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-12-2009
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Nutritional status and physical activity are known to alter immune function, which may be relevant to lymphomagenesis. The authors examined body size measurements and recreational physical activity in relation to risk of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in the prospective California Teachers Study. Between 1995 and 2007, 574 women were diagnosed with incident B-cell NHL among 121,216 eligible women aged 22-84 years at cohort entry. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by fitting Cox proportional hazards models for all B-cell NHL combined and for the 3 most common subtypes: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma. Height was positively associated with risk of all B-cell NHLs (for >1.70 vs. 1.61-1.65 m, relative risk = 1.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.16, 1.96) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (relative risk = 1.93, 95% confidence interval: 1.09, 3.41). Weight and body mass index at age 18 years were positive predictors of B-cell NHL risk overall. These findings indicate that greater height, which may reflect genetics, early life immune function, infectious exposures, nutrition, or growth hormone levels, may play a role in NHL etiology. Adiposity at age 18 years may be more relevant to NHL etiology than that in later life.
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Reproductive factors and non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk in the California Teachers Study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2009
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Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a malignancy etiologically linked to immunomodulatory exposures and disorders. Endogenous female sex hormones may modify immune function and influence NHL risk. Few studies have examined associations between reproductive factors, which can serve as surrogates for such hormonal exposures, and NHL risk by subtype.
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The Jade Ribbon Campaign: a model program for community outreach and education to prevent liver cancer in Asian Americans.
J Immigr Minor Health
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2009
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The Jade Ribbon Campaign (JRC) is a culturally targeted, community-based outreach program to promote the prevention, early detection, and management of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and liver cancer among Asian Americans. In 2001, 476 Chinese American adults from the San Francisco Bay Area attended an HBV screening clinic and educational seminar. The prevalence of chronic HBV infection was 13%; only 8% of participants showed serologic evidence of protective antibody from prior vaccination. Participants reported low preventive action before the clinic, but after one year, 67% of those with chronic HBV infection had consulted a physician for liver cancer screening, and 78% of all participants had encouraged family members to be tested for HBV. The increase in HBV awareness, screening, and physician follow-up suggests that culturally aligned interventions similar to the JRC may help reduce the disproportionate burden of disease to chronic HBV infection among Asian Americans.
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Eliminating the threat of chronic hepatitis B in the Asian and Pacific Islander community: a call to action.
Asian Pac. J. Cancer Prev.
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2009
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Chronic hepatitis B in the Asian and Pacific Islander (API) population is among our nations greatest ethnic and racial health disparities. Despite comprising 4.3% of the population, API make up a disproportionate half of the 1.2-2 million Americans living with chronic hepatitis B. As many as two-thirds of API are not aware of their infection because they have not been tested. This lack of knowledge prevents them from undergoing life-saving liver cancer screening and potential treatment. Likewise, those not protected are unaware that they should be vaccinated. Instead, there is a pervasive lack of awareness among API and healthcare providers. New concerted public health actions are needed to eliminate this major health disparity.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.