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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Proteome-wide epitope mapping of antibodies using ultra-dense peptide arrays.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2014
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Antibodies are of importance for the field of proteomics, both as reagents for imaging cells, tissues, and organs and as capturing agents for affinity enrichment in mass-spectrometry-based techniques. It is important to gain basic insights regarding the binding sites (epitopes) of antibodies and potential cross-reactivity to nontarget proteins. Knowledge about an antibody's linear epitopes is also useful in, for instance, developing assays involving the capture of peptides obtained from trypsin cleavage of samples prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we describe, for the first time, the design and use of peptide arrays covering all human proteins for the analysis of antibody specificity, based on parallel in situ photolithic synthesis of a total of 2.1 million overlapping peptides. This has allowed analysis of on- and off-target binding of both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, complemented with precise mapping of epitopes based on full amino acid substitution scans. The analysis suggests that linear epitopes are relatively short, confined to five to seven residues, resulting in apparent off-target binding to peptides corresponding to a large number of unrelated human proteins. However, subsequent analysis using recombinant proteins suggests that these linear epitopes have a strict conformational component, thus giving us new insights regarding how antibodies bind to their antigens.
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Overexpression of sigma factor SigB improves temperature and butanol tolerance of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.
J. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2014
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Among phenotypes of interest for an industrial cyanobacteria host are improved tolerance to temperature, salt, and solvent stress. Cellular responses to many stresses are controlled by the network of sensory receptors and downstream regulatory proteins. We applied transcription factor engineering to Synechocystis and tested mutant strains for tolerance to temperature and the biofuel 1-butanol. Histidine kinases (Hik), response regulators (Rre), and an RNA polymerase sigma factor (SigB) were overexpressed or deleted. Overexpression of SigB increased both temperature and butanol tolerance and lowered the intracellular concentration of reactive oxygen species. This report demonstrates that alteration of regulatory proteins in a cyanobacterium can be a useful tool to improve stress tolerance.
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Using transcriptomics to improve butanol tolerance of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2013
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Cyanobacteria are emerging as promising hosts for production of advanced biofuels such as n-butanol and alkanes. However, cyanobacteria suffer from the same product inhibition problems as those that plague other microbial biofuel hosts. High concentrations of butanol severely reduce growth, and even small amounts can negatively affect metabolic processes. An understanding of how cyanobacteria are affected by their biofuel product can enable identification of engineering strategies for improving their tolerance. Here we used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to assess the transcriptome response of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to two concentrations of exogenous n-butanol. Approximately 80 transcripts were differentially expressed at 40 mg/liter butanol, and 280 transcripts were different at 1 g/liter butanol. Our results suggest a compromised cell membrane, impaired photosynthetic electron transport, and reduced biosynthesis. Accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scaled with butanol concentration. Using the physiology and transcriptomics data, we selected several genes for overexpression in an attempt to improve butanol tolerance. We found that overexpression of several proteins, notably, the small heat shock protein HspA, improved tolerance to butanol. Transcriptomics-guided engineering created more solvent-tolerant cyanobacteria strains that could be the foundation for a more productive biofuel host.
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Active-site motions and polarity enhance catalytic turnover of hydrated subtilisin dissolved in organic solvents.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2009
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The enzyme subtilisin Carlsberg was surfactant-solubilized into two organic solvents, isooctane and tetrahydrofuran, and hydrated through stepwise changes in the thermodynamic water activity, a(w). The apparent turnover number k(cat)(app) in these systems ranged from 0.2 to 80 s(-1) and increased 11-fold in isooctane and up to 50-fold in tetrahydrofuran with increasing a(w). (19)F NMR relaxation experiments employing an active-site inhibitor were used to assess the dependence of active-site motions on a(w). The rates of NMR-derived fast (k > 10(7) s(-1)) and slow (k < 10(4) s(-1)) active-site motions increased in both solvents upon hydration, but only the slow motions correlated with k(cat). The (19)F chemical shift was a sensitive probe of the local electronic environment and provided an empirical measure of the active-site dielectric constant epsilon(as), which increased with hydration to epsilon(as) approximately 13 in each solvent. In both solvents, the transition state free energy data and epsilon(as) followed Kirkwoods model for the continuum solvation of a dipole, indicating that water also enhanced catalysis by altering the active-sites electronic environment and increasing its polarity to better stabilize the transition state. These results reveal that favorable dynamic and electrostatic effects both contribute to accelerated catalysis by solubilized subtilisin Carlsberg upon hydration in organic solvents.
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Automated solid-phase subcloning based on beads brought into proximity by magnetic force.
PLoS ONE
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In the fields of proteomics, metabolic engineering and synthetic biology there is a need for high-throughput and reliable cloning methods to facilitate construction of expression vectors and genetic pathways. Here, we describe a new approach for solid-phase cloning in which both the vector and the gene are immobilized to separate paramagnetic beads and brought into proximity by magnetic force. Ligation events were directly evaluated using fluorescent-based microscopy and flow cytometry. The highest ligation efficiencies were obtained when gene- and vector-coated beads were brought into close contact by application of a magnet during the ligation step. An automated procedure was developed using a laboratory workstation to transfer genes into various expression vectors and more than 95% correct clones were obtained in a number of various applications. The method presented here is suitable for efficient subcloning in an automated manner to rapidly generate a large number of gene constructs in various vectors intended for high throughput applications.
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Multiplex epitope mapping using bacterial surface display reveals both linear and conformational epitopes.
Sci Rep
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As antibody-based diagnosis and therapy grow at an increased pace, there is a need for methods which rapidly and accurately determine antibody-antigen interactions. Here, we report a method for the multiplex determination of antibody epitopes using bacterial cell-surface display. A protein-fragment library with 10(7) cell clones, covering 60 clinically-relevant protein targets, was created and characterized with massively parallel sequencing. Using this multi-target fragment library we determined simultaneously epitopes of commercial monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies targeting PSMA, EGFR, and VEGF. Off-target binding was observed for one of the antibodies, which demonstrates the methods ability to reveal cross-reactivity. We exemplify the detection of structural epitopes by mapping the therapeutic antibody Avastin. Based on our findings we suggest this method to be suitable for mapping linear and structural epitopes of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies in a multiplex fashion and could find applicability in serum profiling as well as other protein-protein interaction studies.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.