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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Repeat midurethral sling compared with urethral bulking for recurrent stress urinary incontinence.
Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2014
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To compare the effectiveness and safety of repeat midurethral sling with urethral bulking after failed midurethral sling.
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Long-term outcomes after native tissue vs. biological graft-augmented repair in the posterior compartment.
Int Urogynecol J
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2011
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We aimed to compare the outcomes of native tissue vs. biological graft-augmented repair in the posterior compartment. We hypothesized that the addition of graft would result in superior anatomic and functional outcomes.
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Sexual function before and after non-surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence.
Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2011
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OBJECTIVES: (1) to describe sexual function in women seeking treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI); (2) to compare the impact on sexual function of three SUI treatments; and (3) to investigate whether non-surgical treatment of SUI is associated with improved sexual function. METHODS: Women with SUI were randomized to continence pessary, behavioral therapy (pelvic floor muscle training and continence strategies), or combination therapy. Sexual function was assessed at baseline and 3-months using short forms of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse-Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire (PISQ-12) and the Personal Experiences Questionnaire (SPEQ). Successful treatment of SUI was assessed with a patient global impression of improvement. ANOVA was used to compare scores between groups. RESULTS: At baseline, sexual function was worse among women with mixed incontinence compared to those with pure SUI. After therapy, successful treatment of SUI was associated with greater improvement in PISQ-12 score (2.26 ± 3.24 versus 0.48 ± 3.76, p=0.0007), greater improvement in incontinence with sexual activity (0.45 ± 0.84 versus 0.01 ± 0.71, p=0.0002), and greater reduction in restriction in sexual activity related to fear of incontinence (0.32 ± 0.76 versus -0.06 ± 0.78, p=0.0008). Among those successfully treated for SUI, improvement in continence during sexual activity was greater in both the combined therapy group (p=0.019) and the behavioral group (p=0.02) compared to the pessary group. CONCLUSIONS: Successful non-surgical treatment of SUI is associated with improvements in incontinence-specific measures of sexual function. Behavioral therapy may be preferred to pessary for treatment of SUI among women whose incontinence interferes with sexual function.
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Effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence in women.
Open Access J Urol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
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The purpose of this research was review the epidemiology of the association of obesity and urinary incontinence, and to summarize the published data on the effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence.
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Video. Magnetic retraction for NOTES transvaginal cholecystectomy.
Surg Endosc
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2010
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Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has the potential to decrease the burden of an operation on a patient. Limitations of the endoscopic platform require innovative solutions to provide retraction and create an operation comparable with the gold standard, laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
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Racial differences in pelvic organ prolapse.
Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2009
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To compare the estimated prevalence of, risk factors for, and level of bother associated with subjectively reported and objectively measured pelvic organ prolapse in a racially diverse cohort.
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The impact of obesity on urinary incontinence symptoms, severity, urodynamic characteristics and quality of life.
J. Urol.
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2009
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We compared urinary incontinence severity measures and the impact of stress urinary incontinence in normal, overweight and obese women.
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Video. NOTES: transvaginal cholecystectomy with assisting articulating instruments.
Surg Endosc
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2009
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Transvaginal cholecystectomy has been performed at several institutions using hybrid natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) techniques.
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Urinary frequency in community-dwelling women: what is normal?
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2009
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The objective of the study was to assess urinary frequency in community-dwelling women.
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Natural orifice surgery: initial clinical experience.
Surg Endosc
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2009
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Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has moved quickly from preclinical investigation to clinical implementation. However, several major technical problems limit clinical NOTES including safe access, retraction and dissection of the gallbladder, and clipping of key structures. This study aimed to identify challenges and develop solutions for NOTES during the initial clinical experience.
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Impact of surgically induced weight loss on pelvic floor disorders.
Int Urogynecol J
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Given the increased prevalence of obesity and pelvic floor disorders (PFDs), we estimated changes in prevalence, bother, and quality of life (QOL) for PFDs in obese women undergoing bariatric surgery. We hypothesized PFDs would improve after surgical weight loss.
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Pelvic floor symptoms improve similarly after pessary and behavioral treatment for stress incontinence.
Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg
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The objective of this study was to determine if differences exist in pelvic symptom distress and impact on women randomized to pessary versus behavioral therapy for treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI).
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.