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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Reduced amygdala and ventral striatal activity to happy faces in PTSD is associated with emotional numbing.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2014
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There has been a growing recognition of the importance of reward processing in PTSD, yet little is known of the underlying neural networks. This study tested the predictions that (1) individuals with PTSD would display reduced responses to happy facial expressions in ventral striatal reward networks, and (2) that this reduction would be associated with emotional numbing symptoms. 23 treatment-seeking patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder were recruited from the treatment clinic at the Centre for Traumatic Stress Studies, Westmead Hospital, and 20 trauma-exposed controls were recruited from a community sample. We examined functional magnetic resonance imaging responses during the presentation of happy and neutral facial expressions in a passive viewing task. PTSD participants rated happy facial expression as less intense than trauma-exposed controls. Relative to controls, PTSD participants revealed lower activation to happy (-neutral) faces in ventral striatum and and a trend for reduced activation in left amygdala. A significant negative correlation was found between emotional numbing symptoms in PTSD and right ventral striatal regions after controlling for depression, anxiety and PTSD severity. This study provides initial evidence that individuals with PTSD have lower reactivity to happy facial expressions, and that lower activation in ventral striatal-limbic reward networks may be associated with symptoms of emotional numbing.
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Inhibitory neural activity predicts response to cognitive-behavioral therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder.
J Clin Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2013
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Despite cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) being an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), many patients do not respond to CBT. Understanding the neural bases of treatment response may inform treatment refinement, thereby improving treatment response rates. Adequate working memory function is proposed to enable engagement in CBT.
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Neural responses to masked fear faces: sex differences and trauma exposure in posttraumatic stress disorder.
J Abnorm Psychol
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2010
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Although women have a greater propensity than men to develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following trauma, sex differences in neural activations to threat have received little investigation. This study tested the prediction that trauma would heighten activity in automatic fear-processing networks to a greater extent in women than in men. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were recorded in 23 participants with PTSD (13 women, 10 men), 21 trauma-exposed controls (9 women, 12 men), and 42 non-trauma-exposed controls (22 women, 20 men) while they viewed masked facial expressions of fear. Exposure to trauma was associated with enhanced brainstem activity to fear in women, regardless of the presence of PTSD, but in men, it was associated only with the development of PTSD. Men with PTSD displayed greater hippocampal activity to fear than did women. Both men and women with PTSD showed enhanced amygdala activity to fear relative to controls. The authors conclude that greater brainstem activation to threat stimuli may contribute to the greater prevalence of PTSD in women, and greater hippocampal activation in men may subserve an enhanced capacity for contextualizing fear-related stimuli.
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Alterations in theta activity associated with novelty and routinization processing in ADHD.
Clin Neurophysiol
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2010
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Novelty and routinization-related information processing disturbances were examined in adolescent males with ADHD using an oddball paradigm and electrophysiological measurement of theta (4-7Hz) activity.
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Preliminary evidence of the short allele of the serotonin transporter gene predicting poor response to cognitive behavior therapy in posttraumatic stress disorder.
Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2010
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This study was intended to assess the extent to which the low-expression alleles of the serotonin transporter gene promoter predict poor response to cognitive behavior therapy in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
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Duration of posttraumatic stress disorder predicts hippocampal grey matter loss.
Neuroreport
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2009
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To examine the impact of environmental stress on grey matter volume in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we investigated the relationship between duration of PTSD and grey matter volume of hippocampus and anterior cingulate cortex. Twenty-one participants with PTSD and 17 trauma-exposed controls, matched for age and sex and with no history of substance dependence, underwent a T1-weighted structural MRI scan and voxel-based morphometry was employed. After controlling for age, depression and whole-brain volume, analysis of covariance revealed significant reductions in hippocampus and rostral anterior cingulate cortex in PTSD, and there was a significant negative correlation between right hippocampal volume and PTSD duration. This pattern suggests that prolonged PTSD may have cumulative adverse effects on hippocampal volume, highlighting the potential role of genetic-environmental interactions.
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Heterogeneity of non-conscious fear perception in posttraumatic stress disorder as a function of physiological arousal: an fMRI study.
Psychiatry Res
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2009
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While posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often characterised by an excessive fear response and hyperarousal, research has generally neglected other clinical characteristics including hypoarousal. Findings indicate that concurrent autonomic activity is associated with increased non-conscious processing of fear, highlighting that autonomic responsivity may be an important determinant in the degree of activation within the brainstem-amygdala-MPFC (medial prefrontal cortex) network.
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Impact of the H1N1 influenza pandemic in two rural emergency departments.
Rural Remote Health
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The World Health Organization declared an influenza H1N1 global pandemic in June 2009, which resulted in a great deal of research. However, no studies have been published on incidence, characteristics and impact in rural emergency departments (EDs).
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.