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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
3D human tissue models that incorporate diabetic foot ulcer-derived fibroblasts mimic in vivo features of chronic wounds.
Tissue Eng Part C Methods
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2014
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Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) are a major, debilitating complication of diabetes mellitus. Unfortunately, many DFUs are refractory to existing treatments and frequently lead to amputation. The development of more effective therapies has been hampered by the lack of predictive in vitro methods to investigate the mechanisms underlying impaired healing. To address this need for realistic wound healing models, we established patient-derived fibroblasts from DFUs and site-matched controls and used them to construct three-dimensional (3D) models of chronic wound healing. Incorporation of DFU-derived fibroblasts into these models accurately recapitulated the following key aspects of chronic ulcers: reduced stimulation of angiogenesis, increased keratinocyte proliferation, decreased re-epithelialization, and impaired extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. In addition to reflecting clinical attributes of DFUs, the wound healing potential of DFU fibroblasts demonstrated in this suite of models correlated with in vivo wound closure in mice. Thus, the reported panel of 3D DFU models provides a more biologically-relevant platform for elucidating the cell-cell and cell-matrix related mechanisms responsible for chronic wound pathogenesis and may improve translation of in vitro findings into efficacious clinical applications.
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Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibition prevents blood-retinal barrier breakdown, inflammation and neuronal cell death in the retina of type 1 diabetic rats.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2014
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Diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of vision loss in working-age population, is often associated with inflammation and apoptosis. We have previously reported that sitagliptin, a DPP-IV inhibitor, exerts beneficial effects in the retina of type 2 diabetic animals. The present study aimed to evaluate whether sitagliptin can exert protective effects in the retina of type 1 diabetic animals by a mechanism independent of insulin secretion and glycemia normalization. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated orally with sitagliptin (5mg/kg/day) for the last two weeks of 4 weeks of diabetes. Sitagliptin treatment did not change the weight and glucose, HbA1c or insulin levels. However, it prevented the diabetes-induced increase in DPP-IV/CD26 activity and levels in serum and retina. Sitagliptin also prevented the increase in blood-retinal barrier (BRB) permeability and inhibited the changes in immunoreactivity and endothelial subcellular distribution of occludin, claudin-5 and ZO-1 proteins induced by diabetes. Furthermore, sitagliptin decreased the retinal inflammatory state and neuronal apoptosis. Sitagliptin inhibited the BRB breakdown in a type 1 diabetic animal model, by a mechanism independent of normalization of glycemia, by preventing changes in tight junctions (TJs) organization. Sitagliptin also exerted protective effects against inflammation and pro-apoptotic state in the retina of diabetic rats. Altogether, these results suggest that sitagliptin might be envisaged to be used to prevent or delay some of the alterations associated with the development of diabetic retinopathy.
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Neurotensin-loaded collagen dressings reduce inflammation and improve wound healing in diabetic mice.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2013
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Impaired wound healing is an important clinical problem in diabetes mellitus and results in failure to completely heal diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), which may lead to lower extremity amputations. In the present study, collagen based dressings were prepared to be applied as support for the delivery of neurotensin (NT), a neuropeptide that acts as an inflammatory modulator in wound healing. The performance of NT alone and NT-loaded collagen matrices to treat wounds in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic induced mice was evaluated. Results showed that the prepared dressings were not-cytotoxic up to 72h after contact with macrophages (Raw 264.7) and human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell lines. Moreover, those cells were shown to adhere to the collagen matrices without noticeable change in their morphology. NT-loaded collagen dressings induced faster healing (17% wound area reduction) in the early phases of wound healing in diabetic wounded mice. In addition, they also significantly reduced inflammatory cytokine expression namely, TNF-? (p<0.01) and IL-1? (p<0.01) and decreased the inflammatory infiltrate at day 3 post-wounding (inflammatory phase). After complete healing, metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) is reduced in diabetic skin (p<0.05) which significantly increased fibroblast migration and collagen (collagen type I, alpha 2 (COL1A2) and collagen type III, alpha 1 (COL3A1)) expression and deposition. These results suggest that collagen-based dressings can be an effective support for NT release into diabetic wound enhancing the healing process. Nevertheless, a more prominent scar is observed in diabetic wounds treated with collagen when compared to the treatment with NT alone.
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Chitosan-based dressings loaded with neurotensin-an efficient strategy to improve early diabetic wound healing.
Acta Biomater
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2013
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One important complication of diabetes mellitus is chronic, non-healing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). This study aims to develop and use dressings based on chitosan derivatives for the sustained delivery of neurotensin (NT), a neuropeptide that acts as an inflammatory modulator in wound healing. Three different derivatives, namely N-carboxymethyl chitosan, 5-methyl pyrrolidinone chitosan (MPC) and N-succinyl chitosan, are presented as potential biomaterials for wound healing applications. Our results show that MPC has the best fluid handling capacity and delivery profile, also being non-toxic to Raw 264.7 and HaCaT cells. NT-loaded and non-loaded MPC dressings were applied to control/diabetic wounds to evaluate their in vitro/in vivo performance. The results show that the former induced more rapid healing (50% wound area reduction) in the early phases of wound healing in diabetic mice. A NT-loaded MPC foam also reduced expression of the inflammatory cytokine TNF-? (P<0.001) and decreased the amount of inflammatory infiltrate on day 3. On day 10 MMP-9 was reduced in diabetic skin (P<0.001), significantly increasing fibroblast migration and collagen (COL1A1, COL1A2 and COL3A1) expression and deposition. These results suggest that MPC-based dressings may work as an effective support for sustained NT release to reduce DFUs.
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Neurotensin modulates the migratory and inflammatory response of macrophages under hyperglycemic conditions.
Biomed Res Int
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2013
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Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are characterized by an unsatisfactory inflammatory and migratory response. Skin inflammation involves the participation of many cells and particularly macrophages. Macrophage function can be modulated by neuropeptides; however, little is known regarding the role of neurotensin (NT) as a modulator of macrophages under inflammatory and hyperglycemic conditions. RAW 264.7 cells were maintained at 10/30 mM glucose, stimulated with/without LPS (1 ?g/mL), and treated with/without NT(10 nM). The results show that NT did not affect macrophage viability. However, NT reverted the hyperglycemia-induced impair in the migration of macrophages. The expression of IL-6 and IL-1? was significantly increased under 10 mM glucose in the presence of NT, while IL-1? and IL-12 expression significantly decreased under inflammatory and hyperglycemic conditions. More importantly, high glucose modulates NT and NT receptor expression under normal and inflammatory conditions. These results highlight the effect of NT on cell migration, which is strongly impaired under hyperglycemic conditions, as well as its effect in decreasing the proinflammatory status of macrophages under hyperglycemic and inflammatory conditions. These findings provide new insights into the potential therapeutic role of NT in chronic wounds, such as in DFU, characterized by a deficit in the migratory properties of cells and a chronic proinflammatory status.
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Increased skin inflammation and blood vessel density in human and experimental diabetes.
Int J Low Extrem Wounds
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2013
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Systemic inflammation is associated with impaired wound healing in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Using immunohistochemistry techniques, the authors investigated changes in skin inflammation and skin blood vessels in human and experimental diabetes. Comparing to the non-DM human subjects, the total number of inflammatory cells per biopsy and the number of inflammatory cells around blood vessels, a strong indication of inflammation, were higher in DM subjects irrespective of their risk for developing diabetic foot ulcer. Inflammatory cell infiltration was robustly increased in all DM animal models compared with their non-DM controls. The number and density of blood vessels and CD31 positive proliferating endothelial cells around preexisting skin vessels was also higher in the DM patients. However, there were no differences in the skin blood flow between the non-DM and DM subjects. The number of skin blood vessels was also increased in the DM animals; however, these differences were less obvious than the ones observed for inflammatory cells. We conclude that skin inflammation and skin blood vessel density is increased in diabetic human subjects and in rodent and rabbit models of diabetes.
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Role of endothelial progenitor cells and inflammatory cytokines in healing of diabetic foot ulcers.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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To evaluate changes in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and cytokines in patients with diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) in association with wound healing.
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Methamphetamine transiently increases the blood-brain barrier permeability in the hippocampus: role of tight junction proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9.
Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2011
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Methamphetamine (METH) is a powerful stimulant drug of abuse that has steadily gained popularity worldwide. It is known that METH is highly neurotoxic and causes irreversible damage of brain cells leading to neurological and psychiatric abnormalities. Recent studies suggested that METH-induced neurotoxicity might also result from its ability to compromise blood-brain barrier (BBB) function. Due to the crucial role of BBB in the maintenance of brain homeostasis and protection against toxic molecules and pathogenic organisms, its dysfunction could have severe consequences. In this study, we investigated the effect of an acute high dose of METH (30mg/kg) on BBB permeability after different time points and in different brain regions. For that, young adult mice were sacrificed 1h, 24h or 72h post-METH administration. METH increased BBB permeability, but this effect was detected only at 24h after administration, being therefore a transitory effect. Interestingly, we also found that the hippocampus was the most susceptible brain region to METH, comparing to frontal cortex and striatum. Moreover, in an attempt to identify the key players in METH-induced BBB dysfunction we further investigated potential alterations in tight junction (TJ) proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). METH was able to decrease the protein levels of zonula occludens (ZO)-1, claudin-5 and occludin in the hippocampus 24h post-injection, and increased the activity and immunoreactivity of MMP-9. The pre-treatment with BB-94 (30mg/kg), a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, prevented the METH-induced increase in MMP-9 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. Overall, the present data demonstrate that METH transiently increases the BBB permeability in the hippocampus, which can be explained by alterations on TJ proteins and MMP-9.
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Calcium dobesilate inhibits the alterations in tight junction proteins and leukocyte adhesion to retinal endothelial cells induced by diabetes.
Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2010
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Calcium dobesilate (CaD) has been used in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy in the last decades, but its mechanisms of action are not elucidated. CaD is able to correct the excessive vascular permeability in the retina of diabetic patients and in experimental diabetes. We investigated the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of CaD against the increase in blood-retinal barrier (BRB) permeability induced by diabetes.
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High glucose and oxidative/nitrosative stress conditions induce apoptosis in retinal endothelial cells by a caspase-independent pathway.
Exp. Eye Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2009
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Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of vision loss among working-age adults. Retinal endothelial cell apoptosis is an early event in DR, and oxidative stress is known to play an important role in this pathology. Recently, we found that high glucose induces apoptosis in retinal neural cells by a caspase-independent mechanism. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying retinal endothelial cell apoptosis induced by high glucose and oxidative/nitrosative stress conditions. Endothelial cells (TR-iBRB2 rat retinal endothelial cell line) were exposed to high glucose (long-term exposure, 7 days), or to NOC-18 (nitric oxide donor; 250microM) or H(2)O(2) (100microM) for 24h. Cell viability was assessed by the MTT assay and cell proliferation by [methyl-(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA. Apoptotic cells were detected with Hoechst or Annexin V staining. Active caspases were detected by an apoptosis detection kit. Active caspase-3 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) protein levels were assessed by Western blot or immunohistochemistry. High glucose, NOC-18 and H(2)O(2) increased apoptosis in retinal endothelial cells. High glucose and mannitol decreased cell proliferation, but mannitol did not induce apoptosis. Caspase activation did not increase in high glucose- or NOC-18-treated cells, but it increased in cells exposed to H(2)O(2). However, the protein levels of AIF decreased in mitochondrial fractions and increased in nuclear fractions, in all conditions. These results are the first demonstrating that retinal endothelial cell apoptosis induced by high glucose is independent of caspase activation, and is correlated with AIF translocation to the nucleus. NOC-18 and H(2)O(2) also activate a caspase-independent apoptotic pathway, although H(2)O(2) can also induce caspase-mediated apoptosis.
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Heme oxygenase-1 protects retinal endothelial cells against high glucose- and oxidative/nitrosative stress-induced toxicity.
PLoS ONE
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Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of visual loss and blindness, characterized by microvascular dysfunction. Hyperglycemia is considered the major pathogenic factor for the development of diabetic retinopathy and is associated with increased oxidative/nitrosative stress in the retina. Since heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an enzyme with antioxidant and protective properties, we investigated the potential protective role of HO-1 in retinal endothelial cells exposed to high glucose and oxidative/nitrosative stress conditions. Retinal endothelial cells were exposed to elevated glucose, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by MTT assay, Hoechst staining, TUNEL assay and Annexin V labeling. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected by the oxidation of 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. The content of HO-1 was assessed by immunobloting and immunofluorescence. HO activity was determined by bilirubin production. Long-term exposure (7 days) of retinal endothelial cells to elevated glucose decreased cell viability and had no effect on HO-1 content. However, a short-time exposure (24 h) to elevated glucose did not alter cell viability, but increased both the levels of intracellular ROS and HO-1 content. Moreover, the inhibition of HO with SnPPIX unmasked the toxic effect of high glucose and revealed the protection conferred by HO-1. Oxidative/nitrosative stress conditions increased cell death and HO-1 protein levels. These effects of elevated glucose and HO inhibition on cell death were confirmed in primary endothelial cells (HUVECs). When cells were exposed to oxidative/nitrosative stress conditions there was also an increase in retinal endothelial cell death and HO-1 content. The inhibition of HO enhanced ROS production and the toxic effect induced by exposure to H(2)O(2) and NOC-18 (NO donor). Overexpression of HO-1 prevented the toxic effect induced by H(2)O(2) and NOC-18. In conclusion, HO-1 exerts a protective effect in retinal endothelial cells exposed to hyperglycemic and oxidative/nitrosative stress conditions.
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Mechanisms involved in the development and healing of diabetic foot ulceration.
Diabetes
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We examined the role of vascular function and inflammation in the development and failure to heal diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). We followed 104 diabetic patients for a period of 18.4 ± 10.8 months. At the beginning of the study, we evaluated vascular reactivity and serum inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. DFUs developed in 30 (29%) patients. DFU patients had more severe neuropathy, higher white blood cell count, and lower endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation in the macrocirculation. Complete ulcer healing was achieved in 16 (53%) patients, whereas 13 (47%) patients did not heal. There were no differences in the above parameters between the two groups, but patients whose ulcers failed to heal had higher tumor necrosis factor-?, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9), and fibroblast growth factor 2 serum levels when compared with those who healed. Skin biopsy analysis showed that compared with control subjects, diabetic patients had increased immune cell infiltration, expression of MMP-9, and protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B), which negatively regulates the signaling of insulin, leptin, and growth factors. We conclude that increased inflammation, expression of MMP-9, PTP1B, and aberrant growth factor levels are the main factors associated with failure to heal DFUs. Targeting these factors may prove helpful in the management of DFUs.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.