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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Systolic blood pressure levels among adults with hypertension and incident cardiovascular events: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
JAMA Intern Med
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2014
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Studies document a progressive increase in heart disease risk as systolic blood pressure (SBP) rises above 115 mm Hg, but it is unknown whether an SBP lower than 120 mm Hg among adults with hypertension (HTN) lowers heart failure, stroke, and myocardial infarction risk.
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C-reactive protein and subclinical cardiovascular disease among African-Americans: (the Jackson Heart Study).
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown)
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2014
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Systemic inflammation has been implicated as an early marker for subclinical cardiovascular disease; however, findings have been inconsistent in the African-American population.
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Large multiethnic Candidate Gene Study for C-reactive protein levels: identification of a novel association at CD36 in African Americans.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2014
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C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable biomarker of systemic inflammation and a predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Large-scale genetic association studies for CRP have largely focused on individuals of European descent. We sought to uncover novel genetic variants for CRP in a multiethnic sample using the ITMAT Broad-CARe (IBC) array, a custom 50,000 SNP gene-centric array having dense coverage of over 2,000 candidate CVD genes. We performed analyses on 7,570 African Americans (AA) from the Candidate gene Association Resource (CARe) study and race-combined meta-analyses that included 29,939 additional individuals of European descent from CARe, the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and KORA studies. We observed array-wide significance (p < 2.2 × 10(-6)) for four loci in AA, three of which have been reported previously in individuals of European descent (IL6R, p = 2.0 × 10(-6); CRP, p = 4.2 × 10(-71); APOE, p = 1.6 × 10(-6)). The fourth significant locus, CD36 (p = 1.6 × 10(-6)), was observed at a functional variant (rs3211938) that is extremely rare in individuals of European descent. We replicated the CD36 finding (p = 1.8 × 10(-5)) in an independent sample of 8,041 AA women from WHI; a meta-analysis combining the CARe and WHI AA results at rs3211938 reached genome-wide significance (p = 1.5 × 10(-10)). In the race-combined meta-analyses, 13 loci reached significance, including ten (CRP, TOMM40/APOE/APOC1, HNF1A, LEPR, GCKR, IL6R, IL1RN, NLRP3, HNF4A and BAZ1B/BCL7B) previously associated with CRP, and one (ARNTL) previously reported to be nominally associated with CRP. Two novel loci were also detected (RPS6KB1, p = 2.0 × 10(-6); CD36, p = 1.4 × 10(-6)). These results highlight both shared and unique genetic risk factors for CRP in AA compared to populations of European descent.
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Whole-exome sequencing identifies rare and low-frequency coding variants associated with LDL cholesterol.
Leslie A Lange, Youna Hu, He Zhang, Chenyi Xue, Ellen M Schmidt, Zheng-zheng Tang, Chris Bizon, Ethan M Lange, Joshua D Smith, Emily H Turner, Goo Jun, Hyun Min Kang, Gina Peloso, Paul Auer, Kuo-Ping Li, Jason Flannick, Ji Zhang, Christian Fuchsberger, Kyle Gaulton, Cecilia Lindgren, Adam Locke, Alisa Manning, Xueling Sim, Manuel A Rivas, Oddgeir L Holmen, Omri Gottesman, Yingchang Lu, Douglas Ruderfer, Eli A Stahl, Qing Duan, Yun Li, Peter Durda, Shuo Jiao, Aaron Isaacs, Albert Hofman, Joshua C Bis, Adolfo Correa, Michael E Griswold, Johanna Jakobsdottir, Albert V Smith, Pamela J Schreiner, Mary F Feitosa, Qunyuan Zhang, Jennifer E Huffman, Jacy Crosby, Christina L Wassel, Ron Do, Nora Franceschini, Lisa W Martin, Jennifer G Robinson, Themistocles L Assimes, David R Crosslin, Elisabeth A Rosenthal, Michael Tsai, Mark J Rieder, Deborah N Farlow, Aaron R Folsom, Thomas Lumley, Ervin R Fox, Christopher S Carlson, Ulrike Peters, Rebecca D Jackson, Cornelia M van Duijn, André G Uitterlinden, Daniel Levy, Jerome I Rotter, Herman A Taylor, Vilmundur Gudnason, David S Siscovick, Myriam Fornage, Ingrid B Borecki, Caroline Hayward, Igor Rudan, Y Eugene Chen, Erwin P Bottinger, Ruth J F Loos, Pål Sætrom, Kristian Hveem, Michael Boehnke, Leif Groop, Mark McCarthy, Thomas Meitinger, Christie M Ballantyne, Stacey B Gabriel, Christopher J O'Donnell, Wendy S Post, Kari E North, Alexander P Reiner, Eric Boerwinkle, Bruce M Psaty, David Altshuler, Sekar Kathiresan, Dan-Yu Lin, Gail P Jarvik, L Adrienne Cupples, Charles Kooperberg, James G Wilson, Deborah A Nickerson, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Stephen S Rich, Russell P Tracy, Cristen J Willer, .
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a treatable, heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified 157 variants associated with lipid levels but are not well suited to assess the impact of rare and low-frequency variants. To determine whether rare or low-frequency coding variants are associated with LDL-C, we exome sequenced 2,005 individuals, including 554 individuals selected for extreme LDL-C (>98(th) or <2(nd) percentile). Follow-up analyses included sequencing of 1,302 additional individuals and genotype-based analysis of 52,221 individuals. We observed significant evidence of association between LDL-C and the burden of rare or low-frequency variants in PNPLA5, encoding a phospholipase-domain-containing protein, and both known and previously unidentified variants in PCSK9, LDLR and APOB, three known lipid-related genes. The effect sizes for the burden of rare variants for each associated gene were substantially higher than those observed for individual SNPs identified from GWASs. We replicated the PNPLA5 signal in an independent large-scale sequencing study of 2,084 individuals. In conclusion, this large whole-exome-sequencing study for LDL-C identified a gene not known to be implicated in LDL-C and provides unique insight into the design and analysis of similar experiments.
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Echocardiographic Measures of Cardiac Structure and Function Are Associated with Risk of Atrial Fibrillation in Blacks: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Several studies have examined the link between atrial fibrillation (AF) and various echocardiographic measures of cardiac structure and function in whites and other racial groups but not in blacks. Exploring AF risk factors in blacks is important given that the lower incidence of AF in this racial group despite higher risk factors, is not completely explained.
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Comparable ascertainment of newly-diagnosed atrial fibrillation using active cohort follow-up versus surveillance of centers for medicare and medicaid services in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Increasingly, epidemiologic studies use administrative data to identify atrial fibrillation (AF). Capture of incident AF is not well documented. We examined incidence rates and concordance of AF diagnosis based on active cohort follow-up versus surveillance of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.
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Increased Burden of Cardiovascular Disease in Carriers of APOL1 Genetic Variants.
Circ. Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-30-2013
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Two distinct alleles in the gene encoding apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1), a major component of HDL, confer protection against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infection and also increase risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Approximately 14% of African-Americans carry two APOL1 risk alleles, accounting for the high CKD burden in this population.
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Rationale and Design of a Multicenter Echocardiographic Study to Assess the Relationship Between Cardiac Structure and Function and Heart Failure Risk in a Biracial Cohort of Community Dwelling Elderly Persons: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARI
Circ Cardiovasc Imaging
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2013
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-Heart failure (HF) is an important public health concern particularly among persons over 65 years of age. Women and African Americans are critically understudied populations that carry a sizeable portion of the HF burden. Limited normative and prognostic data exist regarding measures of cardiac structure, diastolic function, and novel measures of systolic deformation in older adults living in the community.
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Gene-environment interaction between SCN5A-1103Y and hypokalemia influences QT interval prolongation in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study.
Am. Heart J.
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2013
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African-American ancestry, hypokalemia, and QT interval prolongation on the electrocardiogram are all risk factors for sudden cardiac death (SCD), but their interactions remain to be characterized. SCN5A-1103Y is a common missense variant, of African ancestry, of the cardiac sodium channel gene. SCN5A-1103Y is known to interact with QT-prolonging factors to promote ventricular arrhythmias in persons at high risk for SCD, but its clinical impact in the general African-American population has not been established.
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Aldosterone, C-reactive protein, and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide are associated with the development of metabolic syndrome and longitudinal changes in metabolic syndrome components: findings from the Jackson Heart Study.
Diabetes Care
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2013
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Several pathomechanisms are implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome (MetS), most of which have not been investigated in African Americans (AAs). We examined the contribution of a selected panel of biomarkers to the development of MetS in Jackson Heart Study (JHS) participants in this investigation.
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Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction in African-Americans - The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
JACC Heart Fail
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2013
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In an entirely African-American cohort, we compared clinical characteristics, cardiac structure and function, and all cause mortality in heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) in relation to HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and those without HF.
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Genome-wide association analysis of blood-pressure traits in African-ancestry individuals reveals common associated genes in African and non-African populations.
Nora Franceschini, Ervin Fox, Zhaogong Zhang, Todd L Edwards, Michael A Nalls, Yun Ju Sung, Bamidele O Tayo, Yan V Sun, Omri Gottesman, Adebawole Adeyemo, Andrew D Johnson, J Hunter Young, Ken Rice, Qing Duan, Fang Chen, Yun Li, Hua Tang, Myriam Fornage, Keith L Keene, Jeanette S Andrews, Jennifer A Smith, Jessica D Faul, Zhang Guangfa, Wei Guo, Yu Liu, Sarah S Murray, Solomon K Musani, Sathanur Srinivasan, Digna R Velez Edwards, Heming Wang, Lewis C Becker, Pascal Bovet, Murielle Bochud, Ulrich Broeckel, Michel Burnier, Cara Carty, Daniel I Chasman, Georg Ehret, Wei-Min Chen, Guanjie Chen, Wei Chen, Jingzhong Ding, Albert W Dreisbach, Michele K Evans, Xiuqing Guo, Melissa E Garcia, Rich Jensen, Margaux F Keller, Guillaume Lettre, Vaneet Lotay, Lisa W Martin, Jason H Moore, Alanna C Morrison, Thomas H Mosley, Adesola Ogunniyi, Walter Palmas, George Papanicolaou, Alan Penman, Joseph F Polak, Paul M Ridker, Babatunde Salako, Andrew B Singleton, Daniel Shriner, Kent D Taylor, Ramachandran Vasan, Kerri Wiggins, Scott M Williams, Lisa R Yanek, Wei Zhao, Alan B Zonderman, Diane M Becker, Gerald Berenson, Eric Boerwinkle, Erwin Bottinger, Mary Cushman, Charles Eaton, Fredrik Nyberg, Gerardo Heiss, Joel N Hirschhron, Virginia J Howard, Konrad J Karczewsk, Matthew B Lanktree, Kiang Liu, Yongmei Liu, Ruth Loos, Karen Margolis, Michael Snyder, , Bruce M Psaty, Nicholas J Schork, David R Weir, Charles N Rotimi, Michèle M Sale, Tamara Harris, Sharon L R Kardia, Steven C Hunt, Donna Arnett, Susan Redline, Richard S Cooper, Neil J Risch, D C Rao, Jerome I Rotter, Aravinda Chakravarti, Alex P Reiner, Daniel Levy, Brendan J Keating, Xiaofeng Zhu.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2013
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High blood pressure (BP) is more prevalent and contributes to more severe manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in African Americans than in any other United States ethnic group. Several small African-ancestry (AA) BP genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been published, but their findings have failed to replicate to date. We report on a large AA BP GWAS meta-analysis that includes 29,378 individuals from 19 discovery cohorts and subsequent replication in additional samples of AA (n = 10,386), European ancestry (EA) (n = 69,395), and East Asian ancestry (n = 19,601). Five loci (EVX1-HOXA, ULK4, RSPO3, PLEKHG1, and SOX6) reached genome-wide significance (p < 1.0 × 10(-8)) for either systolic or diastolic BP in a transethnic meta-analysis after correction for multiple testing. Three of these BP loci (EVX1-HOXA, RSPO3, and PLEKHG1) lack previous associations with BP. We also identified one independent signal in a known BP locus (SOX6) and provide evidence for fine mapping in four additional validated BP loci. We also demonstrate that validated EA BP GWAS loci, considered jointly, show significant effects in AA samples. Consequently, these findings suggest that BP loci might have universal effects across studied populations, demonstrating that multiethnic samples are an essential component in identifying, fine mapping, and understanding their trait variability.
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Gender differences in the association of visceral and subcutaneous adiposity with adiponectin in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2013
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Adiponectin, paradoxically reduced in obesity and with lower levels in African Americans (AA), modulates several cardiometabolic risk factors. Because abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT), known to be reduced in AA, and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) compartments may confer differential metabolic risk profiles, we investigated the associations of VAT and SAT with serum adiponectin, separately by gender, with the hypothesis that VAT is more strongly inversely associated with adiponectin than SAT.
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Assessing the phenotypic effects in the general population of rare variants in genes for a dominant Mendelian form of diabetes.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2013
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Genome sequencing can identify individuals in the general population who harbor rare coding variants in genes for Mendelian disorders and who may consequently have increased disease risk. Previous studies of rare variants in phenotypically extreme individuals display ascertainment bias and may demonstrate inflated effect-size estimates. We sequenced seven genes for maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) in well-phenotyped population samples (n = 4,003). We filtered rare variants according to two prediction criteria for disease-causing mutations: reported previously in MODY or satisfying stringent de novo thresholds (rare, conserved and protein damaging). Approximately 1.5% and 0.5% of randomly selected individuals from the Framingham and Jackson Heart Studies, respectively, carry variants from these two classes. However, the vast majority of carriers remain euglycemic through middle age. Accurate estimates of variant effect sizes from population-based sequencing are needed to avoid falsely predicting a substantial fraction of individuals as being at risk for MODY or other Mendelian diseases.
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Loci influencing blood pressure identified using a cardiovascular gene-centric array.
Santhi K Ganesh, Vinicius Tragante, Wei Guo, Yiran Guo, Matthew B Lanktree, Erin N Smith, Toby Johnson, Berta Almoguera Castillo, John Barnard, Jens Baumert, Yen-Pei Christy Chang, Clara C Elbers, Martin Farrall, Mary E Fischer, Nora Franceschini, Tom R Gaunt, Johannes M I H Gho, Christian Gieger, Yan Gong, Aaron Isaacs, Marcus E Kleber, Irene Mateo Leach, Caitrin W McDonough, Matthijs F L Meijs, Olle Mellander, Cliona M Molony, Ilja M Nolte, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Tom S Price, Ramakrishnan Rajagopalan, Jonathan Shaffer, Sonia Shah, Haiqing Shen, Nicole Soranzo, Peter J van der Most, Erik P A van Iperen, Jessica van Setten, Jessic A Van Setten, Judith M Vonk, Li Zhang, Amber L Beitelshees, Gerald S Berenson, Deepak L Bhatt, Jolanda M A Boer, Eric Boerwinkle, Ben Burkley, Amber Burt, Aravinda Chakravarti, Wei Chen, Rhonda M Cooper-DeHoff, Sean P Curtis, Albert Dreisbach, David Duggan, Georg B Ehret, Richard R Fabsitz, Myriam Fornage, Ervin Fox, Clement E Furlong, Ron T Gansevoort, Marten H Hofker, G Kees Hovingh, Susan A Kirkland, Kandice Kottke-Marchant, Abdullah Kutlar, Andrea Z LaCroix, Taimour Y Langaee, Yun R Li, Honghuang Lin, Kiang Liu, Steffi Maiwald, Rainer Malik, , Gurunathan Murugesan, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Jeffery R O'Connell, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Willem H Ouwehand, Walter Palmas, Brenda W Penninx, Carl J Pepine, Mary Pettinger, Joseph F Polak, Vasan S Ramachandran, Jane Ranchalis, Susan Redline, Paul M Ridker, Lynda M Rose, Hubert Scharnag, Nicholas J Schork, Daichi Shimbo, Alan R Shuldiner, Sathanur R Srinivasan, Ronald P Stolk, Herman A Taylor, Barbara Thorand, Mieke D Trip, Cornelia M van Duijn, W Monique Verschuren, Cisca Wijmenga, Bernhard R Winkelmann, Sharon Wyatt, J Hunter Young, Bernhard O Boehm, Mark J Caulfield, Daniel I Chasman, Karina W Davidson, Pieter A Doevendans, Garret A FitzGerald, John G Gums, Hakon Hakonarson, Hans L Hillege, Thomas Illig, Gail P Jarvik, Julie A Johnson, John J P Kastelein, Wolfgang Koenig, Winfried März, Braxton D Mitchell, Sarah S Murray, Albertine J Oldehinkel, Daniel J Rader, Muredach P Reilly, Alex P Reiner, Eric E Schadt, Roy L Silverstein, Harold Snieder, Alice V Stanton, André G Uitterlinden, Pim van der Harst, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Nilesh J Samani, Andrew D Johnson, Patricia B Munroe, Paul I W de Bakker, Xiaofeng Zhu, Daniel Levy, Brendan J Keating, Folkert W Asselbergs.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2013
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Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable determinant of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ?50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ?2100 candidate genes for cardiovascular phenotypes in 61 619 individuals of European ancestry from cohort studies in the USA and Europe. We identified novel associations between rs347591 and SBP (chromosome 3p25.3, in an intron of HRH1) and between rs2169137 and DBP (chromosome1q32.1 in an intron of MDM4) and between rs2014408 and SBP (chromosome 11p15 in an intron of SOX6), previously reported to be associated with MAP. We also confirmed 10 previously known loci associated with SBP, DBP, MAP or PP (ADRB1, ATP2B1, SH2B3/ATXN2, CSK, CYP17A1, FURIN, HFE, LSP1, MTHFR, SOX6) at array-wide significance (P < 2.4 × 10(-6)). We then replicated these associations in an independent set of 65 886 individuals of European ancestry. The findings from expression QTL (eQTL) analysis showed associations of SNPs in the MDM4 region with MDM4 expression. We did not find any evidence of association of the two novel SNPs in MDM4 and HRH1 with sequelae of high BP including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or stroke. In summary, we identified two novel loci associated with BP and confirmed multiple previously reported associations. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, some of which may eventually provide new targets for therapeutic intervention.
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Associations of adiponectin and leptin with incident coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke in african americans: the jackson heart study.
Front Public Health
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Background: Because the predictive significance of previously reported racial differences in leptin and adiponectin levels remains unclear, we assessed the prospective association of these adipokines with the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in African Americans, a population with a high prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods: Serum specimens from 4,571 Jackson Heart Study participants without prevalent CVD at baseline examination (2000-2004) were analyzed for adiponectin and leptin levels. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate the associations of the two adipokines with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and incident ischemic stroke. Results: During 6.2?years average of follow-up, 98 incident CHD and 87 incident ischemic stroke events were documented. Among study participants (64% women; mean age 54?±?13?years), the mean (standard deviation, SD) was 6.04 (4.32) ?g/mL in women and 4.03 (3.14) ?g/mL in men for adiponectin and 37.35 (23.90) ng/mL in women and 11.03 (10.05) ng/mL in men for leptin. After multivariable adjustment that included age, body mass index, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, systolic blood pressure, hypertension medication, smoking, and physical activity, adiponectin was directly associated in women with incident stroke, HR?=?1.41 (1.04-1.91) per one SD increase (p?=?0.03), but not in men (p?=?0.42). It was not associated with incident CHD in women or men. Leptin was not associated with incident CHD or incident stroke. Conclusion: In the largest community-based African American cohort, adiponectin was associated among women with a higher risk of incident stroke. Whether adiponectin harbors harmful properties, or it is produced in response to vascular inflammation to counter the atherosclerotic process, or the putative "adiponectin resistance" phenomenon acts, should be further assessed.
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Association of adiponectin with left ventricular mass in blacks: the Jackson Heart Study.
Circ Heart Fail
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2011
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Blacks have a higher prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy than whites. Several population-based studies have reported an inverse association between adiponectin and left ventricular mass (LVM); however, the relationship between adiponectin levels and LVM has yet to be defined in blacks. The Jackson Heart Study cohort provides an opportunity to test the hypothesis that the inverse association between adiponectin and LVM may be modified by risk factors common among blacks.
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Relation of obesity to circulating B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations in blacks: the Jackson Heart Study.
Circulation
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2011
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Lower plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations in obese individuals ("natriuretic handicap") may play a role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension. Whether this phenomenon may contribute to hypertension in blacks is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that body mass index is inversely related to BNP concentrations in blacks.
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Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk.
, Georg B Ehret, Patricia B Munroe, Kenneth M Rice, Murielle Bochud, Andrew D Johnson, Daniel I Chasman, Albert V Smith, Martin D Tobin, Germaine C Verwoert, Shih-Jen Hwang, Vasyl Pihur, Peter Vollenweider, Paul F O'Reilly, Najaf Amin, Jennifer L Bragg-Gresham, Alexander Teumer, Nicole L Glazer, Lenore Launer, Jing Hua Zhao, Yurii Aulchenko, Simon Heath, Siim Sõber, Afshin Parsa, Jian'an Luan, Pankaj Arora, Abbas Dehghan, Feng Zhang, Gavin Lucas, Andrew A Hicks, Anne U Jackson, John F Peden, Toshiko Tanaka, Sarah H Wild, Igor Rudan, Wilmar Igl, Yuri Milaneschi, Alex N Parker, Cristiano Fava, John C Chambers, Ervin R Fox, Meena Kumari, Min Jin Go, Pim van der Harst, Wen Hong Linda Kao, Marketa Sjögren, D G Vinay, Myriam Alexander, Yasuharu Tabara, Sue Shaw-Hawkins, Peter H Whincup, Yongmei Liu, Gang Shi, Johanna Kuusisto, Bamidele Tayo, Mark Seielstad, Xueling Sim, Khanh-Dung Hoang Nguyen, Terho Lehtimäki, Giuseppe Matullo, Ying Wu, Tom R Gaunt, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Matthew N Cooper, Carl G P Platou, Elin Org, Rebecca Hardy, Santosh Dahgam, Jutta Palmen, Veronique Vitart, Peter S Braund, Tatiana Kuznetsova, Cuno S P M Uiterwaal, Adebowale Adeyemo, Walter Palmas, Harry Campbell, Barbara Ludwig, Maciej Tomaszewski, Ioanna Tzoulaki, Nicholette D Palmer, Thor Aspelund, Melissa Garcia, Yen-Pei C Chang, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Nanette I Steinle, Diederick E Grobbee, Dan E Arking, Sharon L Kardia, Alanna C Morrison, Dena Hernandez, Samer Najjar, Wendy L McArdle, David Hadley, Morris J Brown, John M Connell, Aroon D Hingorani, Ian N M Day, Debbie A Lawlor, John P Beilby, Robert W Lawrence, Robert Clarke, Jemma C Hopewell, Halit Ongen, Albert W Dreisbach, Yali Li, J Hunter Young, Joshua C Bis, Mika Kähönen, Jorma Viikari, Linda S Adair, Nanette R Lee, Ming-Huei Chen, Matthias Olden, Cristian Pattaro, Judith A Hoffman Bolton, Anna Köttgen, Sven Bergmann, Vincent Mooser, Nish Chaturvedi, Timothy M Frayling, Muhammad Islam, Tazeen H Jafar, Jeanette Erdmann, Smita R Kulkarni, Stefan R Bornstein, Jürgen Gräßler, Leif Groop, Benjamin F Voight, Johannes Kettunen, Philip Howard, Andrew Taylor, Simonetta Guarrera, Fulvio Ricceri, Valur Emilsson, Andrew Plump, Inês Barroso, Kay-Tee Khaw, Alan B Weder, Steven C Hunt, Yan V Sun, Richard N Bergman, Francis S Collins, Lori L Bonnycastle, Laura J Scott, Heather M Stringham, Leena Peltonen, Markus Perola, Erkki Vartiainen, Stefan-Martin Brand, Jan A Staessen, Thomas J Wang, Paul R Burton, María Soler Artigas, Yanbin Dong, Harold Snieder, Xiaoling Wang, Haidong Zhu, Kurt K Lohman, Megan E Rudock, Susan R Heckbert, Nicholas L Smith, Kerri L Wiggins, Ayo Doumatey, Daniel Shriner, Gudrun Veldre, Margus Viigimaa, Sanjay Kinra, Dorairaj Prabhakaran, Vikal Tripathy, Carl D Langefeld, Annika Rosengren, Dag S Thelle, Anna Maria Corsi, Andrew Singleton, Terrence Forrester, Gina Hilton, Colin A McKenzie, Tunde Salako, Naoharu Iwai, Yoshikuni Kita, Toshio Ogihara, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Tomonori Okamura, Hirotsugu Ueshima, Satoshi Umemura, Susana Eyheramendy, Thomas Meitinger, H-Erich Wichmann, Yoon Shin Cho, Hyung-Lae Kim, Jong-Young Lee, James Scott, Joban S Sehmi, Weihua Zhang, Bo Hedblad, Peter Nilsson, George Davey Smith, Andrew Wong, Narisu Narisu, Alena Stančáková, Leslie J Raffel, Jie Yao, Sekar Kathiresan, Christopher J O'Donnell, Stephen M Schwartz, M Arfan Ikram, W T Longstreth, Thomas H Mosley, Sudha Seshadri, Nick R G Shrine, Louise V Wain, Mario A Morken, Amy J Swift, Jaana Laitinen, Inga Prokopenko, Paavo Zitting, Jackie A Cooper, Steve E Humphries, John Danesh, Asif Rasheed, Anuj Goel, Anders Hamsten, Hugh Watkins, Stephan J L Bakker, Wiek H van Gilst, Charles S Janipalli, K Radha Mani, Chittaranjan S Yajnik, Albert Hofman, Francesco U S Mattace-Raso, Ben A Oostra, Ayse Demirkan, Aaron Isaacs, Fernando Rivadeneira, Edward G Lakatta, Marco Orrù, Angelo Scuteri, Mika Ala-Korpela, Antti J Kangas, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Pasi Soininen, Taru Tukiainen, Peter Würtz, Rick Twee-Hee Ong, Marcus Dörr, Heyo K Kroemer, Uwe Völker, Henry Völzke, Pilar Galán, Serge Hercberg, Mark Lathrop, Diana Zelenika, Panos Deloukas, Massimo Mangino, Tim D Spector, Guangju Zhai, James F Meschia, Michael A Nalls, Pankaj Sharma, Janos Terzic, M V Kranthi Kumar, Matthew Denniff, Ewa Zukowska-Szczechowska, Lynne E Wagenknecht, F Gerald R Fowkes, Fadi J Charchar, Peter E H Schwarz, Caroline Hayward, Xiuqing Guo, Charles Rotimi, Michiel L Bots, Eva Brand, Nilesh J Samani, Ozren Polašek, Philippa J Talmud, Fredrik Nyberg, Diana Kuh, Maris Laan, Kristian Hveem, Lyle J Palmer, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Juan P Casas, Karen L Mohlke, Paolo Vineis, Olli Raitakari, Santhi K Ganesh, Tien Y Wong, E Shyong Tai, Richard S Cooper, Markku Laakso, Dabeeru C Rao, Tamara B Harris, Richard W Morris, Anna F Dominiczak, Mika Kivimäki, Michael G Marmot, Tetsuro Miki, Danish Saleheen, Giriraj R Chandak, Josef Coresh, Gerjan Navis, Veikko Salomaa, Bok-Ghee Han, Xiaofeng Zhu, Jaspal S Kooner, Olle Melander, Paul M Ridker, Stefania Bandinelli, Ulf B Gyllensten, Alan F Wright, James F Wilson, Luigi Ferrucci, Martin Farrall, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Peter P Pramstaller, Roberto Elosua, Nicole Soranzo, Eric J G Sijbrands, David Altshuler, Ruth J F Loos, Alan R Shuldiner, Christian Gieger, Pierre Meneton, André G Uitterlinden, Nicholas J Wareham, Vilmundur Gudnason, Jerome I Rotter, Rainer Rettig, Manuela Uda, David P Strachan, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Jacques S Beckmann, Eric Boerwinkle, Ramachandran S Vasan, Michael Boehnke, Martin G Larson, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Bruce M Psaty, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Aravinda Chakravarti, Paul Elliott, Cornelia M van Duijn, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Daniel Levy, Mark J Caulfield, Toby Johnson.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (?140?mm?Hg systolic blood pressure or? ?90?mm?Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3, NPR3-C5orf23, ADM, FURIN-FES, GOSR2, GNAS-EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention.
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Combined admixture mapping and association analysis identifies a novel blood pressure genetic locus on 5p13: contributions from the CARe consortium.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2011
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Admixture mapping based on recently admixed populations is a powerful method to detect disease variants with substantial allele frequency differences in ancestral populations. We performed admixture mapping analysis for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), followed by trait-marker association analysis, in 6303 unrelated African-American participants of the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium. We identified five genomic regions (P< 0.001) harboring genetic variants contributing to inter-individual BP variation. In follow-up association analyses, correcting for all tests performed in this study, three loci were significantly associated with SBP and one significantly associated with DBP (P< 10(-5)). Further analyses suggested that six independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contributed to the phenotypic variation observed in the admixture mapping analysis. These six SNPs were examined for replication in multiple, large, independent studies of African-Americans [Womens Health Initiative (WHI), Maywood, Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA) and Howard University Family Study (HUFS)] as well as one native African sample (Nigerian study), with a total replication sample size of 11 882. Meta-analysis of the replication set identified a novel variant (rs7726475) on chromosome 5 between the SUB1 and NPR3 genes, as being associated with SBP and DBP (P< 0.0015 for both); in meta-analyses combining the CARe samples with the replication data, we observed P-values of 4.45 × 10(-7) for SBP and 7.52 × 10(-7) for DBP for rs7726475 that were significant after accounting for all the tests performed. Our study highlights that admixture mapping analysis can help identify genetic variants missed by genome-wide association studies because of drastically reduced number of tests in the whole genome.
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Association of genetic variation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure among African Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource study.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2011
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The prevalence of hypertension in African Americans (AAs) is higher than in other US groups; yet, few have performed genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in AA. Among people of European descent, GWASs have identified genetic variants at 13 loci that are associated with blood pressure. It is unknown if these variants confer susceptibility in people of African ancestry. Here, we examined genome-wide and candidate gene associations with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium consisting of 8591 AAs. Genotypes included genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data utilizing the Affymetrix 6.0 array with imputation to 2.5 million HapMap SNPs and candidate gene SNP data utilizing a 50K cardiovascular gene-centric array (ITMAT-Broad-CARe [IBC] array). For Affymetrix data, the strongest signal for DBP was rs10474346 (P= 3.6 × 10(-8)) located near GPR98 and ARRDC3. For SBP, the strongest signal was rs2258119 in C21orf91 (P= 4.7 × 10(-8)). The top IBC association for SBP was rs2012318 (P= 6.4 × 10(-6)) near SLC25A42 and for DBP was rs2523586 (P= 1.3 × 10(-6)) near HLA-B. None of the top variants replicated in additional AA (n = 11 882) or European-American (n = 69 899) cohorts. We replicated previously reported European-American blood pressure SNPs in our AA samples (SH2B3, P= 0.009; TBX3-TBX5, P= 0.03; and CSK-ULK3, P= 0.0004). These genetic loci represent the best evidence of genetic influences on SBP and DBP in AAs to date. More broadly, this work supports that notion that blood pressure among AAs is a trait with genetic underpinnings but also with significant complexity.
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Genome-wide association studies of the PR interval in African Americans.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2011
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The PR interval on the electrocardiogram reflects atrial and atrioventricular nodal conduction time. The PR interval is heritable, provides important information about arrhythmia risk, and has been suggested to differ among human races. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified common genetic determinants of the PR interval in individuals of European and Asian ancestry, but there is a general paucity of GWA studies in individuals of African ancestry. We performed GWA studies in African American individuals from four cohorts (n?=?6,247) to identify genetic variants associated with PR interval duration. Genotyping was performed using the Affymetrix 6.0 microarray. Imputation was performed for 2.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using combined YRI and CEU HapMap phase II panels. We observed a strong signal (rs3922844) within the gene encoding the cardiac sodium channel (SCN5A) with genome-wide significant association (p<2.5 x 10??) in two of the four cohorts and in the meta-analysis. The signal explained 2% of PR interval variability in African Americans (beta ?=?5.1 msec per minor allele, 95% CI ?=?4.1-6.1, p?=?3 x 10?²³). This SNP was also associated with PR interval (beta?=?2.4 msec per minor allele, 95% CI?=?1.8-3.0, p?=?3 x 10?¹?) in individuals of European ancestry (n?=?14,042), but with a smaller effect size (p for heterogeneity <0.001) and variability explained (0.5%). Further meta-analysis of the four cohorts identified genome-wide significant associations with SNPs in SCN10A (rs6798015), MEIS1 (rs10865355), and TBX5 (rs7312625) that were highly correlated with SNPs identified in European and Asian GWA studies. African ancestry was associated with increased PR duration (13.3 msec, p?=?0.009) in one but not the other three cohorts. Our findings demonstrate the relevance of common variants to African Americans at four loci previously associated with PR interval in European and Asian samples and identify an association signal at one of these loci that is more strongly associated with PR interval in African Americans than in Europeans.
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Genome-wide association study of coronary heart disease and its risk factors in 8,090 African Americans: the NHLBI CARe Project.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2011
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Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality in African Americans. To identify common genetic polymorphisms associated with CHD and its risk factors (LDL- and HDL-cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C), hypertension, smoking, and type-2 diabetes) in individuals of African ancestry, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 8,090 African Americans from five population-based cohorts. We replicated 17 loci previously associated with CHD or its risk factors in Caucasians. For five of these regions (CHD: CDKN2A/CDKN2B; HDL-C: FADS1-3, PLTP, LPL, and ABCA1), we could leverage the distinct linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in African Americans to identify DNA polymorphisms more strongly associated with the phenotypes than the previously reported index SNPs found in Caucasian populations. We also developed a new approach for association testing in admixed populations that uses allelic and local ancestry variation. Using this method, we discovered several loci that would have been missed using the basic allelic and global ancestry information only. Our conclusions suggest that no major loci uniquely explain the high prevalence of CHD in African Americans. Our project has developed resources and methods that address both admixture- and SNP-association to maximize power for genetic discovery in even larger African-American consortia.
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European ancestry as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation in African Americans.
Circulation
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2010
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Despite a higher burden of standard atrial fibrillation (AF) risk factors, African Americans have a lower risk of AF than whites. It is unknown whether the higher risk is due to genetic or environmental factors. Because African Americans have varying degrees of European ancestry, we sought to test the hypothesis that European ancestry is an independent risk factor for AF.
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Genome-wide association analysis identifies multiple loci related to resting heart rate.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2010
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Higher resting heart rate is associated with increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. Though heritable factors play a substantial role in population variation, little is known about specific genetic determinants. This knowledge can impact clinical care by identifying novel factors that influence pathologic heart rate states, modulate heart rate through cardiac structure and function or by improving our understanding of the physiology of heart rate regulation. To identify common genetic variants associated with heart rate, we performed a meta-analysis of 15 genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including 38,991 subjects of European ancestry, estimating the association between age-, sex- and body mass-adjusted RR interval (inverse heart rate) and approximately 2.5 million markers. Results with P < 5 × 10(-8) were considered genome-wide significant. We constructed regression models with multiple markers to assess whether results at less stringent thresholds were likely to be truly associated with RR interval. We identified six novel associations with resting heart rate at six loci: 6q22 near GJA1; 14q12 near MYH7; 12p12 near SOX5, c12orf67, BCAT1, LRMP and CASC1; 6q22 near SLC35F1, PLN and c6orf204; 7q22 near SLC12A9 and UfSp1; and 11q12 near FADS1. Associations at 6q22 400 kb away from GJA1, at 14q12 MYH6 and at 1q32 near CD34 identified in previously published GWAS were confirmed. In aggregate, these variants explain approximately 0.7% of RR interval variance. A multivariant regression model including 20 variants with P < 10(-5) increased the explained variance to 1.6%, suggesting that some loci falling short of genome-wide significance are likely truly associated. Future research is warranted to elucidate underlying mechanisms that may impact clinical care.
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Heritability and genetic linkage of left ventricular mass, systolic and diastolic function in hypertensive African Americans (From the GENOA Study).
Am. J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2010
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Much of the interindividual variation in left ventricular (LV) structure and function is unexplained by established risk factors and may be due to novel or genetic factors. We used pedigree information from 454 tandem markers across the genome to estimate the heritability and linkage of various echocardiographic measures of LV structure and function in a cohort of African-American hypertensive siblings.
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Association of genome-wide variation with the risk of incident heart failure in adults of European and African ancestry: a prospective meta-analysis from the cohorts for heart and aging research in genomic epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2010
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Although genetic factors contribute to the onset of heart failure (HF), no large-scale genome-wide investigation of HF risk has been published to date. We have investigated the association of 2,478,304 single-nucleotide polymorphisms with incident HF by meta-analyzing data from 4 community-based prospective cohorts: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, the Cardiovascular Health Study, the Framingham Heart Study, and the Rotterdam Study.
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Candidate gene association resource (CARe): design, methods, and proof of concept.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2010
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The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institutes Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe), a planned cross-cohort analysis of genetic variation in cardiovascular, pulmonary, hematologic, and sleep-related traits, comprises >40,000 participants representing 4 ethnic groups in 9 community-based cohorts. The goals of CARe include the discovery of new variants associated with traits using a candidate gene approach and the discovery of new variants using the genome-wide association mapping approach specifically in African Americans.
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Genomic variation associated with mortality among adults of European and African ancestry with heart failure: the cohorts for heart and aging research in genomic epidemiology consortium.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2010
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Prognosis and survival are significant concerns for individuals with heart failure (HF). To better understand the pathophysiology of HF prognosis, the association between 2,366,858 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and all-cause mortality was evaluated among individuals with incident HF from 4 community-based prospective cohorts: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, the Cardiovascular Health Study, the Framingham Heart Study, and the Rotterdam Study.
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Left ventricular dysfunction as a risk factor for cardiovascular and noncardiovascular hospitalizations in African Americans.
Am. Heart J.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2010
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A substantial portion of the public health burden of heart failure is due to hospitalizations, many of which are for causes other than cardiovascular disease. We assessed whether left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction was associated with increased risk of both cardiovascular and noncardiovascular hospitalizations in a community sample of African Americans.
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Simultaneous rupture of bronchus and aortic valve from blunt trauma.
Ann. Thorac. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2010
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We report the case of a 29-year-old woman with combined bronchial rupture and aortic valve tear after blunt chest trauma. She was successfully treated with primary repair of both lesions. The importance of chest computed tomography and transthoracic echocardiography in the diagnosis of these lesions is discussed.
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Significance of the amyloidogenic transthyretin Val 122 Ile allele in African Americans in the Arteriosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) and Cardiovascular Health (CHS) Studies.
Am. Heart J.
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2010
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Many African Americans carry an amyloidogenic transthyretin mutation (TTR V122I), with a high risk for cardiac TTR amyloid deposition after the age of 65 years. We wished to determine the allele frequency and its clinical penetrance in community-dwelling African Americans.
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Common variants in KCNN3 are associated with lone atrial fibrillation.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2010
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Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia. Previous studies have identified several genetic loci associated with typical AF. We sought to identify common genetic variants underlying lone AF. This condition affects a subset of individuals without overt heart disease and with an increased heritability of AF. We report a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies conducted using 1,335 individuals with lone AF (cases) and 12,844 unaffected individuals (referents). Cases were obtained from the German AF Network, Heart and Vascular Health Study, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, the Cleveland Clinic and Massachusetts General Hospital. We identified an association on chromosome 1q21 to lone AF (rs13376333, adjusted odds ratio = 1.56; P = 6.3 x 10(-12)), and we replicated this association in two independent cohorts with lone AF (overall combined odds ratio = 1.52, 95% CI 1.40-1.64; P = 1.83 x 10(-21)). rs13376333 is intronic to KCNN3, which encodes a potassium channel protein involved in atrial repolarization.
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The relation of C--reactive protein to chronic kidney disease in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study.
BMC Nephrol
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2010
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African Americans have an increased incidence and worse prognosis with chronic kidney disease (CKD--estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] <60 ml/min/1.73 m2) than their counterparts of European-descent. Inflammation has been related to renal disease in non-Hispanic whites, but there are limited data on the role of inflammation in renal dysfunction in African Americans in the community.
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Clinical correlates and heritability of QT interval duration in blacks: the Jackson Heart Study.
Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2009
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Electrocardiographic QT interval prolongation is a risk factor for sudden cardiac death and drug-induced arrhythmia. The clinical correlates and heritability of QT interval duration in blacks have not been well studied despite their higher risk for sudden cardiac death compared with non-Hispanic whites. We sought to investigate potential correlates of the QT interval and estimate its heritability in the Jackson Heart Study.
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Distribution and determinants of Doppler-derived diastolic flow indices in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study (JHS).
Am. Heart J.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2009
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The objective of this study is to investigate the distribution and determinants of diastolic function in a middle-aged cohort of African Americans (AA).
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Association of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations with longitudinal blood pressure tracking in African Americans: findings from the Jackson Heart Study.
Hypertension
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Water and sodium retention precedes the development of high blood pressure (BP) and explains a compensatory rise in B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations. It is unclear whether BNP concentrations antedate the BP progression. We hypothesized that higher BNP concentrations in our African American cohort will be associated with longitudinal increases in BP, progression of BP stage, and incident hypertension. Our study sample consisted of 888 normotensive (based on BP at examination 1 [2000-2004]) participants of the Jackson Heart Study (mean age, 47±12 years; 61% women). We examined the relation of BNP concentrations at the baseline examination to change in systolic and diastolic BPs, BP progression (an increase by 1 BP stage as defined by THE sixth report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure) and incident hypertension by examination 2 (2005-2008) adjusting for baseline BP stages, systolic and diastolic BPS, traditional risk factors, and echocardiographic left ventricular mass. Over a median follow-up period of 5.0±0.8 years, 36.9% progressed to a higher BP stage and 19.3% developed hypertension. In multivariable regression models, higher log-BNP concentrations at examination 1 were significantly and positively associated with changes in systolic and diastolic BPs (P<0.05 for both). Baseline log-BNP was significantly associated with BP progression (P=0.046). Every SD increase in baseline log BNP was associated with a 12% increased risk of BP progression. Log-BNP was not significantly associated with incident hypertension (P=0.12). In our community-based sample of African Americans, higher BNP concentrations predicted a longitudinal increase in systolic and diastolic BPs and progression of BP stage.
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Impact of ancestry and common genetic variants on QT interval in African Americans.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
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Ethnic differences in cardiac arrhythmia incidence have been reported, with a particularly high incidence of sudden cardiac death and low incidence of atrial fibrillation in individuals of African ancestry. We tested the hypotheses that African ancestry and common genetic variants are associated with prolonged duration of cardiac repolarization, a central pathophysiological determinant of arrhythmia, as measured by the electrocardiographic QT interval.
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Burden of rare sarcomere gene variants in the Framingham and Jackson Heart Study cohorts.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
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Rare sarcomere protein variants cause dominant hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. To evaluate whether allelic variants in eight sarcomere genes are associated with cardiac morphology and function in the community, we sequenced 3,600 individuals from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) and Jackson Heart Study (JHS) cohorts. Out of the total, 11.2% of individuals had one or more rare nonsynonymous sarcomere variants. The prevalence of likely pathogenic sarcomere variants was 0.6%, twice the previous estimates; however, only four of the 22 individuals had clinical manifestations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Rare sarcomere variants were associated with an increased risk for adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio: 2.3) in the FHS cohort, suggesting that cardiovascular risk assessment in the general population can benefit from rare variant analysis.
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Variants in CXADR and F2RL1 are associated with blood pressure and obesity in African-Americans in regions identified through admixture mapping.
J. Hypertens.
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Genetic variants in 296 genes in regions identified through admixture mapping of hypertension, BMI, and lipids were assessed for association with hypertension, blood pressure (BP), BMI, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C).
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