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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Extracts of Devil's club (Oplopanax horridus) exert therapeutic efficacy in experimental models of acute myeloid leukemia.
Phytother Res
PUBLISHED: 10-24-2014
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Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a group of hematological malignancies defined by expanded clonal populations of immature progenitors (blasts) of myeloid phenotype in blood and bone marrow. Given a typical poor prognostic outlook, there is great need for novel agents with anti-AML activity. Devil’s club (Oplopanax horridus) is one of the most significant medicinal plants used among the indigenous people of Southeast Alaska and the coastal Pacific Northwest, with different linguistic groups utilizing various parts of the plant to treat many different conditions including cancer. Studies identifying medically relevant components in Devil’s club are limited. For this research study, samples were extracted in 70% ethanol before in vitro analysis, to assess effects on AML cell line viability as well as to study regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation and cysteine oxidation. The root extract displayed better in vitro anti-AML efficacy in addition to a noted anti-tyrosine kinase activity independent of an antioxidant effect. In vivo therapeutic studies using an immunocompetent murine model of AML further demonstrated that Devil’s club root extract improved the murine survival while decreasing immunosuppressive regulatory T cells and improving CD8+ T-cell functionality. This study defines for the first time an anti-AML efficacy for extracts of Devil’s club.
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Parotid gland solitary fibrous tumor with mandibular bone destruction and aggressive behavior.
J Clin Exp Dent
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2014
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Solitary fibrous tumor is associated with serosal surfaces. Location in the salivary glands is extremely unusual. Extrathoracic tumors have an excellent prognosis associated with their benign clinical behavior. We report an aggressive and recurrent case of this tumor. We review the clinical presentation, inmunohistochemical profiles and therapeutic approaches.
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Conventional but not plasmacytoid dendritic cells foster the systemic virus-induced type I IFN response needed for efficient CD8 T cell priming.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 06-27-2014
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Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are considered to be the principal type-I IFN (IFN-I) source in response to viruses, whereas the contribution of conventional DCs (cDCs) has been underestimated because, on a per-cell basis, they are not considered professional IFN-I-producing cells. We have investigated their respective roles in the IFN-I response required for CTL activation. Using a nonreplicative virus, baculovirus, we show that despite the high IFN-I-producing abilities of pDCs, in vivo cDCs but not pDCs are the pivotal IFN-I producers upon viral injection, as demonstrated by selective pDC or cDC depletion. The pathway involved in the virus-triggered IFN-I response is dependent on TLR9/MyD88 in pDCs and on stimulator of IFN genes (STING) in cDCs. Importantly, STING is the key molecule for the systemic baculovirus-induced IFN-I response required for CTL priming. The supremacy of cDCs over pDCs in fostering the IFN-I response required for CTL activation was also verified in the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus model, in which IFN-? promoter stimulator 1 plays the role of STING. However, when the TLR-independent virus-triggered IFN-I production is impaired, the pDC-induced IFNs-I have a primary impact on CTL activation, as shown by the detrimental effect of pDC depletion and IFN-I signaling blockade on the residual lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-triggered CTL response detected in IFN-? promoter stimulator 1(-/-) mice. Our findings reveal that cDCs play a major role in the TLR-independent virus-triggered IFN-I production required for CTL priming, whereas pDC-induced IFNs-I are dispensable but become relevant when the TLR-independent IFN-I response is impaired.
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Morphological revision of the genus Aiptasia and the family Aiptasiidae (Cnidaria, Actiniaria, Metridioidea).
Zootaxa
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2014
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Sea anemones of the genus Aiptasia Gosse, 1858 are conspicuous members of shallow-water environments worldwide and serve as a model system for studies of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. However, to date there have been no comprehensive analyses investigating the systematics of the group. In addition, previously published phylogenetic studies of sea anemones have shown that the genus is not monophyletic. Herein we revise the genus Aiptasia and the family Aiptasiidae Carlgren, 1924 using newly-collected material. We find that the formerly-named A. pallida (Agassiz in Verrill, 1864) (now Exaiptasia pallida comb. nov.) encompasses a single, widespread species from the tropics and subtropics; we erect a new genus, Exaiptasia gen. nov., for this species primarily based on cnidae, mode of asexual reproduction and symbionts. We also find morphological evidence that supports splitting A. mutabilis into two species: A. couchii (Cocks, 1851) and A. mutabilis. In addition, we find Bellactis Dube, 1983 (formerly placed within Sagartiidae Gosse, 1858) and Laviactis gen. nov. (formerly known Ragactis Andres, 1883, whose familial placement was previously uncertain) belonging within Aiptasiidae. Aiptasiidae is a morphologically homogeneous family whose members (those species in genera Aiptasia, Aiptasiogeton Schmidt, 1972, Bartholomea Duchassaing de Fombressin & Michelotti, 1864, Bellactis, Exaiptasia gen. nov., and Laviactis gen. nov.) are characterized by ectodermal longitudinal muscles in the distal column, rows of cinclides in mid-column, microbasic b-mastigophores in the column, and acontia with basitrichs and microbasic p-amastigophores.
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Versatility of nasolabial flaps in oral cavity reconstructions.
Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2014
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Describe the techniques involved and the results obtained witn nasolabial flaps in small and medium-sized defects of the oral cavity. The procedure is an easy resconstructive option with a high success rate and with very good aesthetic and functional outcomes.
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Luna, a Drosophila KLF6/KLF7, is maternally required for synchronized nuclear and centrosome cycles in the preblastoderm embryo.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Krüppel like factors (KLFs) are conserved transcription factors that have been implicated in many developmental processes including differentiation, organ patterning, or regulation of stem cell pluripotency. We report the generation and analysis of loss-of-function mutants of Drosophila Klf6/7, the luna gene. We demonstrate that luna mutants are associated with very early embryonic defects prior to cellularization at the syncytial stage and cause DNA separation defects during the rapid mitotic cycles resulting in un-coupled DNA and centrosome cycles. These defects manifest themselves, both in animals that are maternally homozygous and heterozygous mutant. Surprisingly, luna is only required during the syncytial stages and not later in development, suggesting that the DNA segregation defect is linked to centrosomes, since centrosomes are dispensable for later cell divisions.
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Hidden among sea anemones: the first comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the order Actiniaria (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Hexacorallia) reveals a novel group of hexacorals.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Sea anemones (order Actiniaria) are among the most diverse and successful members of the anthozoan subclass Hexacorallia, occupying benthic marine habitats across all depths and latitudes. Actiniaria comprises approximately 1,200 species of solitary and skeleton-less polyps and lacks any anatomical synapomorphy. Although monophyly is anticipated based on higher-level molecular phylogenies of Cnidaria, to date, monophyly has not been explicitly tested and at least some hypotheses on the diversification of Hexacorallia have suggested that actiniarians are para- or poly-phyletic. Published phylogenies have demonstrated the inadequacy of existing morphological-based classifications within Actiniaria. Superfamilial groups and most families and genera that have been rigorously studied are not monophyletic, indicating conflict with the current hierarchical classification. We test the monophyly of Actiniaria using two nuclear and three mitochondrial genes with multiple analytical methods. These analyses are the first to include representatives of all three currently-recognized suborders within Actiniaria. We do not recover Actiniaria as a monophyletic clade: the deep-sea anemone Boloceroides daphneae, previously included within the infraorder Boloceroidaria, is resolved outside of Actiniaria in several of the analyses. We erect a new genus and family for B. daphneae, and rank this taxon incerti ordinis. Based on our comprehensive phylogeny, we propose a new formal higher-level classification for Actiniaria composed of only two suborders, Anenthemonae and Enthemonae. Suborder Anenthemonae includes actiniarians with a unique arrangement of mesenteries (members of Edwardsiidae and former suborder Endocoelantheae). Suborder Enthemonae includes actiniarians with the typical arrangement of mesenteries for actiniarians (members of former suborders Protantheae, Ptychodacteae, and Nynantheae and subgroups therein). We also erect subgroups within these two newly-erected suborders. Although some relationships among these newly-defined groups are still ambiguous, morphological and molecular results are consistent enough to proceed with a new higher-level classification and to discuss the putative functional and evolutionary significance of several morphological attributes within Actiniaria.
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Sea anemones (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Actiniaria) from coral reefs in the southern Gulf of Mexico.
Zookeys
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Seven sea anemone species from coral reefs in the southern Gulf of Mexico are taxonomically diagnosed and images from living specimens including external and internal features, and cnidae are provided. Furthermore, the known distribution ranges from another 10 species are extended. No species records of sea anemones have been previously published in the primary scientific literature for coral reefs in the southern Gulf of Mexico and thus, this study represents the first inventory for the local actiniarian fauna.
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Phylogenetic signal in mitochondrial and nuclear markers in sea anemones (Cnidaria, Actiniaria).
Integr. Comp. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2010
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The mitochondrial genome of basal animals is generally more slowly evolving than that of bilaterians. This difference in rate complicates the study of relationships among members of these lineages and the discovery of cryptic species or the testing of morphological species concepts within them. We explore the properties of mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal genes in the cnidarian order Actiniaria, using both an ordinal- and familial-scale sample of taxa. Although the markers do not show significant incongruence, they differ in their phylogenetic informativeness and the kinds of relationships they resolve. Among the markers studied here, the fragments of 12S rDNA and 18S rDNA most effectively recover well-supported nodes; those of 16S rDNA and 28S rDNA are less effective. The general patterns we observed are similar to those in other hexacorallians, although Actiniaria alone show saturation of transitions for ordinal-scale analyses.
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Nucleo-cytoplasmic localization domains regulate Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) protein stability and tumor suppressor function.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-21-2010
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The tumor suppressor KLF6 and its oncogenic cytoplasmic splice variant KLF6-SV1 represent a paradigm in cancer biology in that their antagonistic cancer functions are encoded within the same gene. As a consequence of splicing, KLF6-SV1 loses both the C-terminus C2H2 three zinc finger (ZF) domain, which characterizes all KLF proteins, as well as the adjacent 5 basic region (5BR), a putative nuclear localization signal (NLS). It has been hypothesized that this NLS is a functional domain critical to direct the distinct subcellular localization of the tumor suppressor and its splice variant.
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Phylogenetic relationships among deep-sea and chemosynthetic sea anemones: actinoscyphiidae and actinostolidae (Actiniaria: Mesomyaria).
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2010
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Sea anemones (Cnidaria, Actiniaria) are present in all marine ecosystems, including chemosynthetic environments. The high level of endemicity of sea anemones in chemosynthetic environments and the taxonomic confusion in many of the groups to which these animals belong makes their systematic relationships obscure. We use five molecular markers to explore the phylogenetic relationships of the superfamily Mesomyaria, which includes most of the species that live in chemosynthetic, deep-sea, and polar sea habitats and to test the monophyly of the recently defined clades Actinostolina and Chemosynthina. We found that sea anemones of chemosynthetic environments derive from at least two different lineages: one lineage including acontiate deep-sea taxa and the other primarily encompassing shallow-water taxa.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.