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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
16p11.2 600 kb Duplications confer risk for typical and atypical Rolandic epilepsy.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2014
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Rolandic epilepsy (RE) is the most common idiopathic focal childhood epilepsy. Its molecular basis is largely unknown and a complex genetic etiology is assumed in the majority of affected individuals. The present study tested whether six large recurrent copy number variants at 1q21, 15q11.2, 15q13.3, 16p11.2, 16p13.11 and 22q11.2 previously associated with neurodevelopmental disorders also increase risk of RE. Our association analyses revealed a significant excess of the 600 kb genomic duplication at the 16p11.2 locus (chr16: 29.5-30.1 Mb) in 393 unrelated patients with typical (n = 339) and atypical (ARE; n = 54) RE compared with the prevalence in 65 046 European population controls (5/393 cases versus 32/65 046 controls; Fisher's exact test P = 2.83 × 10(-6), odds ratio = 26.2, 95% confidence interval: 7.9-68.2). In contrast, the 16p11.2 duplication was not detected in 1738 European epilepsy patients with either temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 330) and genetic generalized epilepsies (n = 1408), suggesting a selective enrichment of the 16p11.2 duplication in idiopathic focal childhood epilepsies (Fisher's exact test P = 2.1 × 10(-4)). In a subsequent screen among children carrying the 16p11.2 600 kb rearrangement we identified three patients with RE-spectrum epilepsies in 117 duplication carriers (2.6%) but none in 202 carriers of the reciprocal deletion. Our results suggest that the 16p11.2 duplication represents a significant genetic risk factor for typical and atypical RE.
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Analysis of ELP4, SRPX2, and interacting genes in typical and atypical rolandic epilepsy.
Epilepsia
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2014
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Rolandic epilepsy (RE) and its atypical variants (atypical rolandic epilepsy, ARE) along the spectrum of epilepsy-aphasia disorders are characterized by a strong but largely unknown genetic basis. Two genes with a putative (ELP4) or a proven (SRPX2) function in neuronal migration were postulated to confer susceptibility to parts of the disease spectrum: the ELP4 gene to centrotemporal spikes and SRPX2 to ARE. To reexamine these findings, we investigated a cohort of 280 patients of European ancestry with RE/ARE for the etiological contribution of these genes and their close interaction partners. We performed next-generation sequencing and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-array based genotyping to screen for sequence and structural variants. In comparison to European controls we could not detect an enrichment of rare deleterious variants of ELP4, SRPX2, or their interaction partners in affected individuals. The previously described functional p.N327S variant in the X chromosomal SRPX2 gene was detected in two affected individuals (0.81%) and also in controls (0.26%), with some preponderance of male patients. We did not detect an association of SNPs in the ELP4 gene with centrotemporal spikes as previously reported. In conclusion our data do not support a major role of ELP4 and SRPX2 in the etiology of RE/ARE.
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DEPDC5 mutations in genetic focal epilepsies of childhood.
Ann. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
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Recent studies reported DEPDC5 loss-of-function mutations in different focal epilepsy syndromes. Here we identified 1 predicted truncation and 2 missense mutations in 3 children with rolandic epilepsy (3 of 207). In addition, we identified 3 families with unclassified focal childhood epilepsies carrying predicted truncating DEPDC5 mutations (3 of 82). The detected variants were all novel, inherited, and present in all tested affected (n=11) and in 7 unaffected family members, indicating low penetrance. Our findings extend the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in DEPDC5 and suggest that rolandic epilepsy, albeit rarely, and other nonlesional childhood epilepsies are among the associated syndromes.
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Epilepsy, hippocampal sclerosis and febrile seizures linked by common genetic variation around SCN1A.
Brain
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2013
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Epilepsy comprises several syndromes, amongst the most common being mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. Seizures in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis are typically drug-resistant, and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is frequently associated with important co-morbidities, mandating the search for better understanding and treatment. The cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is unknown, but there is an association with childhood febrile seizures. Several rarer epilepsies featuring febrile seizures are caused by mutations in SCN1A, which encodes a brain-expressed sodium channel subunit targeted by many anti-epileptic drugs. We undertook a genome-wide association study in 1018 people with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 7552 control subjects, with validation in an independent sample set comprising 959 people with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 3591 control subjects. To dissect out variants related to a history of febrile seizures, we tested cases with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with (overall n = 757) and without (overall n = 803) a history of febrile seizures. Meta-analysis revealed a genome-wide significant association for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with febrile seizures at the sodium channel gene cluster on chromosome 2q24.3 [rs7587026, within an intron of the SCN1A gene, P = 3.36 × 10(-9), odds ratio (A) = 1.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.26-1.59]. In a cohort of 172 individuals with febrile seizures, who did not develop epilepsy during prospective follow-up to age 13 years, and 6456 controls, no association was found for rs7587026 and febrile seizures. These findings suggest SCN1A involvement in a common epilepsy syndrome, give new direction to biological understanding of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with febrile seizures, and open avenues for investigation of prognostic factors and possible prevention of epilepsy in some children with febrile seizures.
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Mutations in GRIN2A cause idiopathic focal epilepsy with rolandic spikes.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2013
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Idiopathic focal epilepsy (IFE) with rolandic spikes is the most common childhood epilepsy, comprising a phenotypic spectrum from rolandic epilepsy (also benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, BECTS) to atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE), Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike and waves during slow-wave sleep (CSWS). The genetic basis is largely unknown. We detected new heterozygous mutations in GRIN2A in 27 of 359 affected individuals from 2 independent cohorts with IFE (7.5%; P = 4.83 × 10(-18), Fishers exact test). Mutations occurred significantly more frequently in the more severe phenotypes, with mutation detection rates ranging from 12/245 (4.9%) in individuals with BECTS to 9/51 (17.6%) in individuals with CSWS (P = 0.009, Cochran-Armitage test for trend). In addition, exon-disrupting microdeletions were found in 3 of 286 individuals (1.0%; P = 0.004, Fishers exact test). These results establish alterations of the gene encoding the NMDA receptor NR2A subunit as a major genetic risk factor for IFE.
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Autosomal recessive cortical myoclonic tremor and epilepsy: association with a mutation in the potassium channel associated gene CNTN2.
Brain
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2013
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We characterize a consanguineous Egyptian family with an autosomal recessively inherited familial cortical myoclonic tremor and epilepsy. We used multipoint linkage analysis to map the causative mutation to a 12.7 megabase interval within 1q31.3-q32.2 with a log of odds score of 3.6. For further investigation of the linked region in an efficient and unbiased manner, we performed exome sequencing. Within the suspected region we identified a homozygous single base pair deletion (c.503_503delG) leading to a frameshift in the coding region of the sixth exon of CNTN2 alias TAG-1 (p.Trp168fs), which segregated in the respective family. Many studies point towards an important role of the CNTN2 product contactin 2 in neuronal excitability. Contactin 2, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neuronal membrane protein, and another transmembrane protein called contactin associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2 alias CASPR2) are together necessary to maintain voltage-gated potassium channels at the juxtaparanodal region. CNTN2 knockout mice were previously reported to suffer from spontaneous seizures and mutations in the CNTNAP2 gene have been described to cause epilepsy in humans. To further delineate the role of CNTN2 in patients with epilepsy, we sequenced the coding exons in 189 Caucasian patients with epilepsy. No recessive mutation was detected and heterozygote carriers of rare CNTN2 variants do not seem to be predisposed to epilepsy. Given the severity of the mutation and the proposed function of the gene, we consider this mutation as the most likely cause for cortical myoclonic tremor and epilepsy in this family.
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RBFOX1 and RBFOX3 mutations in rolandic epilepsy.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Partial deletions of the gene encoding the neuronal splicing regulator RBFOX1 have been reported in a range of neurodevelopmental diseases, including idiopathic generalized epilepsy. The RBFOX1 protein and its homologues (RBFOX2 and RBFOX3) regulate alternative splicing of many neuronal transcripts involved in the homeostatic control of neuronal excitability. In this study, we explored if structural microdeletions and exonic sequence variations in RBFOX1, RBFOX2, RBFOX3 confer susceptibility to rolandic epilepsy (RE), a common idiopathic focal childhood epilepsy. By high-density SNP array screening of 289 unrelated RE patients, we identified two hemizygous deletions, a 365?kb deletion affecting two untranslated 5-terminal exons of RBFOX1 and a 43 kb deletion spanning exon 3 of RBFOX3. Exome sequencing of 242 RE patients revealed two novel probably deleterious variants in RBFOX1, a frameshift mutation (p.A233Vfs*74) and a hexanucleotide deletion (p.A299_A300del), and a novel nonsense mutation in RBFOX3 (p.Y287*). Although the three variants were inherited from unaffected parents, they were present in all family members exhibiting the RE trait clinically or electroencephalographically with only one exception. In contrast, no deleterious mutations of RBFOX1 and RBFOX3 were found in the exomes of 6503 non-RE subjects deposited in the Exome Variant Server database. The observed RBFOX3 exon 3 deletion and nonsense mutation suggest that RBFOX3 represents a novel risk factor for RE, indicating that exon deletions and truncating mutations of RBFOX1 and RBFOX3 contribute to the genetic variance of partial and generalized idiopathic epilepsy syndromes.
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A mutation in VPS35, encoding a subunit of the retromer complex, causes late-onset Parkinson disease.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2011
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To identify rare causal variants in late-onset Parkinson disease (PD), we investigated an Austrian family with 16 affected individuals by exome sequencing. We found a missense mutation, c.1858G>A (p.Asp620Asn), in the VPS35 gene in all seven affected family members who are alive. By screening additional PD cases, we saw the same variant cosegregating with the disease in an autosomal-dominant mode with high but incomplete penetrance in two further families with five and ten affected members, respectively. The mean age of onset in the affected individuals was 53 years. Genotyping showed that the shared haplotype extends across 65 kilobases around VPS35. Screening the entire VPS35 coding sequence in an additional 860 cases and 1014 controls revealed six further nonsynonymous missense variants. Three were only present in cases, two were only present in controls, and one was present in cases and controls. The familial mutation p.Asp620Asn and a further variant, c.1570C>T (p.Arg524Trp), detected in a sporadic PD case were predicted to be damaging by sequence-based and molecular-dynamics analyses. VPS35 is a component of the retromer complex and mediates retrograde transport between endosomes and the trans-Golgi network, and it has recently been found to be involved in Alzheimer disease.
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Association of transcription factor polymorphisms PITX3 and EN1 with Parkinsons disease.
Neurobiol. Aging
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2009
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The transcription factors PITX3 and Engrailed 1 (EN1), among others, have been shown to play a crucial role in the maturation and survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The degeneration of those neurons is the pathological hallmark in Parkinsons disease (PD). In a hypothesis-driven candidate gene approach, it has been recently shown that polymorphisms in the genes coding for PITX3 and EN1 are associated with sporadic PD. In a study on 365 patients with PD and 418 controls, we genotyped nine single nucleotide polymorphisms spanning the entire genomic region of PITX3 and EN1. Furthermore, we analyzed whether the genotype of these SNPs associate with the age of onset in PD. We found a strong association between the PITX3 promoter rs3758549 polymorphism and PD (p=0.0001), as well as an association between EN1 rs1438852 and PD (p=0.046). In particular, our highly significant findings regarding the association of rs3758549 reproduce the results of the initial report on transcription factor gene variants, providing further evidence for PITX3 and EN1 polymorphisms as potential genetic risk factors for sporadic PD.
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PARK11 gene (GIGYF2) variants Asn56Ser and Asn457Thr are not pathogenic for Parkinsons disease.
Parkinsonism Relat. Disord.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2009
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The GIGYF2 (Grb10-Interacting GYF Protein-2) gene has recently been proposed to be the responsible gene for the PARK11 locus. Ten different putative pathogenic variants were identified in cohorts of Parkinsons disease (PD) patients from Italy and France. Among these variants Asn56Ser and Asn457Thr were found repeatedly. In the present study we screened 669 PD patients (predominantly of central European origin) and 1051 control individuals for the presence of these two variants. Asn56Ser was found in one patient with a positive family history of the disease and in one control individual. The affected sister of the patient did not carry this variant. Asn457Thr was found in one patient, who was exceptional for his Egyptian origin and in three control individuals. This variant was not found in 50 control individuals from Egypt. We conclude that neither of these two variants plays a major role in the pathogenesis of PD in our study population.
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Lack of association between ABCC2 gene variants and treatment response in epilepsy.
Pharmacogenomics
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The aim of this study was to replicate a previously reported association between drug resistance in epilepsy patients and the 24C>T variant of the ABCC2 gene that codes for the drug efflux transporter MRP2.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.