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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Changes in whole-brain functional networks and memory performance in aging.
Neurobiol. Aging
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2014
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We used resting-functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 98 healthy older adults to analyze how local and global measures of functional brain connectivity are affected by age, and whether they are related to differences in memory performance. Whole-brain networks were created individually by parcellating the brain into 90 cerebral regions and obtaining pairwise connectivity. First, we studied age-associations in interregional connectivity and their relationship with the length of the connections. Aging was associated with less connectivity in the long-range connections of fronto-parietal and fronto-occipital systems and with higher connectivity of the short-range connections within frontal, parietal, and occipital lobes. We also used the graph theory to measure functional integration and segregation. The pattern of the overall age-related correlations presented positive correlations of average minimum path length (r = 0.380, p = 0.008) and of global clustering coefficients (r = 0.454, p < 0.001), leading to less integrated and more segregated global networks. Main correlations in clustering coefficients were located in the frontal and parietal lobes. Higher clustering coefficients of some areas were related to lower performance in verbal and visual memory functions. In conclusion, we found that older participants showed lower connectivity of long-range connections together with higher functional segregation of these same connections, which appeared to indicate a more local clustering of information processing. Higher local clustering in older participants was negatively related to memory performance.
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White matter/gray matter contrast changes in chronic and diffuse traumatic brain injury.
J. Neurotrauma
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2013
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Abstract Signal-intensity contrast of T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans has been associated with tissue integrity and reported as a sign of neurodegenerative changes in diseases such as Alzheimers disease. After severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), progressive structural changes occur in white (WM) and gray matter (GM). In the current study, we assessed the signal-intensity contrast of GM and WM in patients with diffuse TBI in the chronic stage to (1) characterize the regional pattern of WM/GM changes in intensity contrast associated with traumatic axonal injury, (2) evaluate possible associations between this measure and diffusion tensor image (DTI)/fractional anisotropy (FA) for detecting WM damage, and (3) investigate the correlates of both measures with cognitive outcomes. Structural T1 scans were processed with FreeSurfer software to identify the boundary and calculate the WM/GM contrast maps. DTIs were processed with the FMRIB software library to obtain FA maps. The WM/GM contrast in TBI patients showed a pattern of reduction in almost all of the brain, except the visual and motor primary regions. Global FA values obtained from DTI correlated with the intensity contrast of all associative cerebral regions. WM/GM contrast correlated with memory functions, whereas FA global values correlated with tests measuring memory and mental processing speed. In conclusion, tissue-contrast intensity is a very sensitive measure for detecting structural brain damage in chronic, severe and diffuse TBI, but is less sensitive than FA for reflecting neuropsychological sequelae, such as impaired mental processing speed.
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Regional vulnerability of hippocampal subfields to aging measured by structural and diffusion MRI.
Hippocampus
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2013
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In the past few years, there has been an increasing awareness of the regional vulnerability of the hippocampus to age-related processes. However, to date, no studies have assessed the effects of age on different structural magnetic resonance parameters in the specific hippocampal subfields. In this study, we measured volume, mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) in the presubiculum, subiculum, fimbria, cornu ammonis (CA) 1,2-3,4-DG and the whole hippocampus in fifty cognitively intact elder adults between 50 and 75 years of age (20 men, 30 women). Segmentation of hippocampal subfields was performed using FreeSurfer. Individual MD and FA images were coregistered to T1-weighted volumes using FLIRT of FSL. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess the effects of age on the anatomical measures of each subfield. In addition, multiple regression analyses were also carried out to assess which of the anatomical measures that showed a correlation with age in the previous analyses, were the best age predictors in the hippocampus. In agreement with previous studies, our results showed a significant association between age and volume (P?
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Inferior frontal and insular cortical thinning is related to dysfunctional brain activation/deactivation during working memory task in schizophrenic patients.
Psychiatry Res
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2013
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Although working memory is known to be impaired in schizophrenia the anatomical and functional relationships underlying this deficit remain to be elucidated. A combined imaging approach involving functional and structural magnetic resonance techniques was used, applying independent component analysis and surface-based morphometry to 14 patients with schizophrenia and 14 healthy controls. Neurocognitive functioning was assessed by a neuropsychological test battery that measured executive function. It was hypothesized that working memory dysfunctional connectivity in schizophrenia is related to underlying anatomical abnormalities. Patients with schizophrenia showed cortical thinning in the left inferior frontal gyrus and insula, which explained 57% of blood oxygenation level-dependent signal magnitude in functional magnetic resonance imaging in the central executive network (lateral prefrontal and parietal cortex) over-activation and default mode network (anterior and posterior cingulate) deactivation. No structure-function relationship emerged in the healthy control group. The study provides evidence to suggest that dysfunctional activation/deactivation patterns in schizophrenia may be explained in terms of underlying gray matter deficits.
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Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging activity and connectivity and cognitive outcome in traumatic brain injury.
JAMA Neurol
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2013
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The study of brain activity and connectivity at rest provides a unique opportunity for the investigation of the brain substrates of cognitive outcome after traumatic axonal injury. This knowledge may contribute to improve clinical management and rehabilitation programs.
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Neuroanatomical correlates of olfactory loss in normal aged subjects.
Behav. Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2013
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In non-demented older persons, smell dysfunction, measured premortem, has been associated with postmortem brain degeneration similar to that of Alzheimers disease. We hypothesized that distinct measures of gray and white matter integrity evaluated through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques could detect degenerative changes associated with age-related olfactory dysfunction. High-resolution T1-weighted images and diffusion-tensor images (DTI) of 30 clinically healthy subjects aged 51-77 were acquired with a 3-Tesla MRI scanner. Odor identification performance was assessed by means of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). UPSIT scores correlated with right amygdalar volume and bilateral perirhinal and entorhinal cortices gray matter volume. Olfactory performance also correlated with postcentral gyrus cortical thickness and with fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity levels in the splenium of the corpus callosum and the superior longitudinal fasciculi. Our results suggest that age-related olfactory loss is accompanied by diffuse degenerative changes that might correspond to the preclinical stages of neurodegenerative processes.
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Diffusion tensor imaging differences relate to memory deficits in diffuse traumatic brain injury.
BMC Neurol
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2011
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Memory is one of the most impaired functions after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to determine the structural basis of memory deficit. We correlated fractional anisotropy (FA) of the fasciculi connecting the main cerebral regions that are involved in declarative and working memory functions.
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A role for the default mode network in the bases of disorders of consciousness.
Ann. Neurol.
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Functional connectivity in the default mode network (DMN) is known to be reduced in patients with disorders of consciousness, to a different extent depending on their clinical severity. Nevertheless, the integrity of the structural architecture supporting this network and its relation with the exhibited functional disconnections are very poorly understood. We investigated the structural connectivity and white matter integrity of the DMN in patients with disorders of consciousness of varying clinical severity.
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Long-term declarative memory deficits in diffuse TBI: correlations with cortical thickness, white matter integrity and hippocampal volume.
Cortex
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We investigated structural brain damage in subjects who had suffered severe and diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI), and examined its relationship with declarative memory impairment. Cortical thickness, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and volumetric and shape data of the hippocampus were assessed in a group of 26 adults with severe TBI in the chronic stage and 22 healthy matched controls. Declarative memory was evaluated by Reys Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). TBI patients performed significantly worse than controls on all RAVLT measures. The group comparison for cortical thickness and DTI revealed a pattern of widespread atrophy in TBI patients. In the TBI group DTI measures correlated with cortical thickness in the prefrontal and parietal regions, including the precuneus. Declarative memory correlated with both cortical thickness and DTI measures. However, although hippocampal volume was significantly decreased in TBI patients, no correlations were found. Multiple regression analysis of all the structural measures revealed that decreases in Fractional anisotropy (FA) and thinning of the left parietal region were the best predictors of memory impairment. In conclusion, cortical thickness reductions in the left hemisphere and a lack of white matter integrity are the main contributors to long-term impairment in declarative memory among patients suffering from severe and diffuse TBI. In this study the hippocampus did not make a significant contribution to memory dysfunctions, suggesting that damage to this structure is compensated for by other regions, with the definitive sequelae being mainly explained by alterations in cortico-subcortical connectivity.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.