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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Compositional profile of ??/??-hydrolase fold proteins in mangrove soil metagenomes: prevalence of epoxide hydrolases and haloalkane dehalogenases in oil-contaminated sites.
Microb Biotechnol
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2014
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The occurrence of genes encoding biotechnologically relevant ?/?-hydrolases in mangrove soil microbial communities was assessed using data obtained by whole-metagenome sequencing of four mangroves areas, denoted BrMgv01 to BrMgv04, in São Paulo, Brazil. The sequences (215?Mb in total) were filtered based on local amino acid alignments against the Lipase Engineering Database. In total, 5923 unassembled sequences were affiliated with 30 different ?/?-hydrolase fold superfamilies. The most abundant predicted proteins encompassed cytosolic hydrolases (abH08;???23%), microsomal hydrolases (abH09;???12%) and Moraxella lipase-like proteins (abH04 and abH01;
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Different effects of transgenic maize and nontransgenic maize on nitrogen-transforming archaea and bacteria in tropical soils.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2014
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The composition of the rhizosphere microbiome is a result of interactions between plant roots, soil, and environmental conditions. The impact of genetic variation in plant species on the composition of the root-associated microbiota remains poorly understood. This study assessed the abundances and structures of nitrogen-transforming (ammonia-oxidizing) archaea and bacteria as well as nitrogen-fixing bacteria driven by genetic modification of their maize host plants. The data show that significant changes in the abundances (revealed by quantitative PCR) of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and archaeal communities occurred as a result of the maize host being genetically modified. In contrast, the structures of the total communities (determined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) were mainly driven by factors such as soil type and season and not by plant genotype. Thus, the abundances of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and archaeal communities but not structures of those communities were revealed to be responsive to changes in maize genotype, allowing the suggestion that community abundances should be explored as candidate bioindicators for monitoring the possible impacts of cultivation of genetically modified plants.
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Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules.
Braz. J. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2014
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Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically) with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules) and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol), respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones) and plant exudates (including ethanol) in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF), adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss), to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS) and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU). Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization), which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain BrMgv02-JM63, a Chitinolytic Bacterium Isolated from Oil-Contaminated Mangrove Soil in Brazil.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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Here, we report the draft genome sequence and the automatic annotation of Bacillus thuringiensis strain BrMgv02-JM63. This genome comprises a set of genes involved in the metabolism of chitin and N-acetylglucosamine utilization, thus suggesting the possible role of this strain in the cycling of organic matter in mangrove soils.
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Endo- and exoglucanase activities in bacteria from mangrove sediment.
Braz. J. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
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The mangrove ecosystem is an unexplored source for biotechnological applications. In this unique environment, endemic bacteria have the ability to thrive in the harsh environmental conditions (salinity and anaerobiosis), and act in the degradation of organic matter, promoting nutrient cycles. Thus, this study aimed to assess the cellulolytic activities of bacterial groups present in the sediment from a mangrove located in Ilha do Cardoso (SP, Brazil). To optimize the isolation of cellulolytic bacteria, enrichments in two types of culture media (tryptone broth and minimum salt medium), both supplemented with 5% NaCl and 1% of cellulose, were performed. Tests conducted with the obtained colonies showed a higher occurrence of endoglycolytic activity (33 isolates) than exoglycolytic (19 isolates), and the degradation activity was shown to be modulated by the presence of NaCl. The isolated bacteria were clustered by BOX-PCR and further classified on the basis of partial 16S rRNA sequences as Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes or Bacteroidetes. Therefore, this study highlights the importance of studies focusing on the endemic species found in mangroves to exploit them as novel biotechnological tools for the degradation of cellulose.
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Screening of endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the saline rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle.
Braz. J. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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In screening the culturable endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle, we found a prevalence of genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. These bacteria revealed different activities in endoglucolysis and biofilm formation when exposed to specific NaCl concentrations, indicating modulated growth under natural variations in mangrove salinity.
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Sulphur-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing communities in Brazilian mangrove sediments.
Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2013
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Mangrove soils are anaerobic environments rich in sulphate and organic matter. Although the sulphur cycle is one of the major actors in this ecosystem, little is known regarding the sulphur bacteria communities in mangrove soils. We investigated the abundance, composition and diversity of sulphur-oxidizing (SOB) and sulphate-reducing (SRB) bacteria in sediments from three Brazilian mangrove communities: two contaminated, one with oil (OilMgv) and one with urban waste and sludge (AntMgv), and one pristine (PrsMgv). The community structures were assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and clone libraries, using genes for the enzymes adenosine-5-phosphosulphate reductase (aprA) and sulphite reductase (Dsr) (dsrB). The abundance for qPCR showed the ratio dsrB/aprA to be variable among mangroves and higher according to the gradient observed for oil contamination in the OilMgv. The PCR-DGGE patterns analysed by Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling revealed differences among the structures of the three mangrove communities. The clone libraries showed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria were the most abundant groups associated with sulphur cycling in mangrove sediments. We conclude that the microbial SOB and SRB communities in mangrove soils are different in each mangrove forest and that such microbial communities could possibly be used as a proxy for contamination in mangrove forests.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium mesophilicum Strain SR1.6/6, Isolated from Citrus sinensis.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2013
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Methylobacterium mesophilicum strain SR1.6/6 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from a surface-sterilized Citrus sinensis branch. Ecological and biotechnological aspects of this bacterium, such as the genes involved in its association with the host plant and the primary oxidation of methanol, were annotated in the draft genome.
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Brazilian Microbiome Project: Revealing the Unexplored Microbial Diversity-Challenges and Prospects.
Microb. Ecol.
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2013
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The Brazilian Microbiome Project (BMP) aims to assemble a Brazilian Metagenomic Consortium/Database. At present, many metagenomic projects underway in Brazil are widely known. Our goal in this initiative is to co-ordinate and standardize these together with new projects to come. It is estimated that Brazil hosts approximately 20 % of the entire worlds macroorganism biological diversity. It is 1 of the 17 countries that share nearly 70 % of the worlds catalogued animal and plant species, and is recognized as one of the most megadiverse countries. At the end of 2012, Brazil has joined GBIF (Global Biodiversity Information Facility), as associated member, to improve the access to the Brazilian biodiversity data in a free and open way. This was an important step toward increasing international collaboration and clearly shows the commitment of the Brazilian government in directing national policies toward sustainable development. Despite its importance, the Brazilian microbial diversity is still considered to be largely unknown, and it is clear that to maintain ecosystem dynamics and to sustainably manage land use, it is crucial to understand the biological and functional diversity of the system. This is the first attempt to collect and collate information about Brazilian microbial genetic and functional diversity in a systematic and holistic manner. The success of the BMP depends on a massive collaborative effort of both the Brazilian and international scientific communities, and therefore, we invite all colleagues to participate in this project.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus stratosphericus LAMA 585, Isolated from the Atlantic Deep Sea.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 05-04-2013
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Bacillus stratosphericus LAMA 585 was isolated from the Mid-Atlantic-Ridge seafloor (5,500-m depth). This bacterium presents the capacity for cellulase, xylanase, and lipase production when growing aerobically in marine-broth media. Genes involved in the tolerance of oligotrophic and extreme conditions and prospection of biotechnological products were annotated in the draft genome (3.7 Mb).
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Water regime influences bulk soil and Rhizosphere of Cereus jamacaru bacterial communities in the Brazilian Caatinga biome.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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We used the T-RFLP technique combined with Ion Torrent (PGM) sequencing of 16S rRNA and multivariate analysis to study the structure of bulk soil and rhizosphere bacterial communities of a cactus, Cereus jamacaru, from the Brazilian Caatinga biome, which is unique to Brazil. The availability of water shapes the rhizosphere communities, resulting in different patterns during the rainy and dry seasons. Taxonomic approaches and statistical analysis revealed that the phylum Actinobacteria strongly correlated with the dry season, while samples from the rainy season exhibited a strong correlation with the phylum Proteobacteria for rhizosphere samples and with the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Lentisphaerae, and Tenericutes for bulk soil samples. The STAMP software also indicated that the phylum Bacteroidetes, as well as two classes in the Proteobacteria phylum (? and ?), were the most significant ones during the rainy season. The average abundance of the phylum Actinobacteria and the genus Bacillus was significantly greater during the dry season. Some significant genera found during the dry season might reflect their tolerance to the extreme conditions found in the Caatinga biome. They may also indicate the ecological function that microorganisms play in providing plants with some degree of tolerance to water stress or in assisting in their development through mechanisms of growth promotion. Alterations in microbial communities can be due to the different abilities of native microorganisms to resist and adapt to environmental changes.
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Different selective effects on rhizosphere bacteria exerted by genetically modified versus conventional potato lines.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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In this study, we assessed the actively metabolizing bacteria in the rhizosphere of potato using two potato cultivars, i.e. the genetically-modified (GM) cultivar Modena (having tubers with altered starch content) and the near-isogenic non-GM cultivar Karnico. To achieve our aims, we pulse-labelled plants at EC90 stage with (13)C-CO2 and analysed their rhizosphere microbial communities 24 h, 5 and 12 days following the pulse. In the analyses, phospholipid fatty acid/stable isotope probing (PLFA-SIP) as well as RNA-SIP followed by reverse transcription and PCR-DGGE and clone library analysis, were used to determine the bacterial groups that actively respond to the root-released (13)C labelled carbonaceous compounds.
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Rice root-associated bacteria: insights into community structures across 10 cultivars.
FEMS Microbiol. Ecol.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2011
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In this study, the effects of plant genotype, soil type and nutrient use efficiency on the composition of different bacterial communities associated with rice roots were investigated. Thus, total bacteria, Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria, Pseudomonas and Actinobacteria were studied using PCR, followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Rice genotype determined, to a large extent, the composition of the different bacterial communities across cultivars. Several cultivars belonging to Oryza sativa ssp. indica tended to select similar bacterial communities, whereas those belonging to subspecies japonica and aromatica selected ones with divergent community structures. An effect of soil type was pronounced for the Actinobacteria communities, while a small effect of improved and traditional plants was noted for all communities analyzed. A few dominant bands in PCR-DGGE, affiliated with Rhizobium radiobacter, Dickeya zeae, Mycobacterium bolletii and with members of the Rhizobiales, Rhodospirillaceae and Paenibacillaceae, were spread across cultivars. In contrast, a majority of bands (e.g. affiliated with Enterobacter cloacae or Burkholderia kururiensis) was only present in particular cultivars or was erratically distributed among rice replicates. These findings suggested that both bacterial adaptation and plant genotype contribute to the shaping of the dynamic bacterial communities associated with roots of rice plants.
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Characterization of a small cryptic plasmid from endophytic Pantoea agglomerans and its use in the construction of an expression vector.
Genet. Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2011
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A circular cryptic plasmid named pPAGA (2,734 bp) was isolated from Pantoea agglomerans strain EGE6 (an endophytic bacterial isolate from eucalyptus). Sequence analysis revealed that the plasmid has a G+C content of 51% and contains four potential ORFs, 238(A), 250(B), 131(C), and 129(D) amino acids in length without homology to known proteins. The shuttle vector pLGM1 was constructed by combining the pPAGA plasmid with pGFPmut3.0 (which harbors a gene encoding green fluorescent protein, GFP), and the resulting construct was used to over-express GFP in E. coli and P. agglomerans cells. GFP production was used to monitor the colonization of strain EGE6gfp in various plant tissues by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of EGE6gfp colonization showed that 14 days after inoculation, the strain occupied the inner tissue of Eucalyptus grandis roots, preferentially colonizing the xylem vessels of the host plants.
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Effect of bacterial inoculation, plant genotype and developmental stage on root-associated and endophytic bacterial communities in potato (Solanum tuberosum).
Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2010
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Beneficial bacteria interact with plants by colonizing the rhizosphere and roots followed by further spread through the inner tissues, resulting in endophytic colonization. The major factors contributing to these interactions are not always well understood for most bacterial and plant species. It is believed that specific bacterial functions are required for plant colonization, but also from the plant side specific features are needed, such as plant genotype (cultivar) and developmental stage. Via multivariate analysis we present a quantification of the roles of these components on the composition of root-associated and endophytic bacterial communities in potato plants, by weighing the effects of bacterial inoculation, plant genotype and developmental stage. Spontaneous rifampicin resistant mutants of two bacterial endophytes, Paenibacillus sp. strain E119 and Methylobacterium mesophilicum strain SR1.6/6, were introduced into potato plants of three different cultivars (Eersteling, Robijn and Karnico). Densities of both strains in, or attached to potato plants were measured by selective plating, while the effects of bacterial inoculation, plant genotype and developmental stage on the composition of bacterial, Alphaproteobacterial and Paenibacillus species were determined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel-electrophoresis (DGGE). Multivariate analyses revealed that the composition of bacterial communities was mainly driven by cultivar type and plant developmental stage, while Alphaproteobacterial and Paenibacillus communities were mainly influenced by bacterial inoculation. These results are important for better understanding the effects of bacterial inoculations to plants and their possible effects on the indigenous bacterial communities in relation with other plant factors such as genotype and growth stage.
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Diversity and identification of methanogenic archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria in sediments from a pristine tropical mangrove.
Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2010
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Mangrove sediments are anaerobic ecosystems rich in organic matter. This environment is optimal for anaerobic microorganisms, such as sulphate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea, which are responsible for nutrient cycling. In this study, the diversity of these two functional guilds was evaluated in a pristine mangrove forest using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone library sequencing in a 50 cm vertical profile sampled every 5.0 cm. DGGE profiles indicated that both groups presented higher richness in shallow samples (0-30 cm) with a steep decrease in richness beyond that depth. According to redundancy analysis, this alteration significantly correlated with a decrease in the amount of organic matter. Clone library sequencing indicated that depth had a strong effect on the selection of dissimilatory sulphate reductase (dsrB) operational taxonomic units (OTUs), as indicated by the small number of shared OTUs found in shallow (0.0 cm) and deep (40.0 cm) libraries. On the other hand, methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcrA) libraries indicated that most of the OTUs found in the shallow library were present in the deep library. These results show that these two guilds co-exist in these mangrove sediments and indicate important roles for these organisms in nutrient cycling within this ecosystem.
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Genetic variability of Brazilian isolates of Alternaria alternata detected by AFLP and RAPD techniques.
Braz. J. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2009
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The Alternaria brown spot (ABS) is a disease caused in tangerine plants and its hybrids by the fungus Alternaria alternata f. sp. citri which has been found in Brazil since 2001. Due to the recent occurrence in Brazilian orchards, the epidemiology and genetic variability of this pathogen is still an issue to be addressed. Here it is presented a survey about the genetic variability of this fungus by the characterization of twenty four pathogenic isolates of A. alternata f. sp. citri from citrus plants and four endophytic isolates from mango (one Alternaria tenuissima and three Alternaria arborescens). The application of two molecular markers Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) had revealed the isolates clustering in distinct groups when fingerprintings were analyzed by Principal Components Analysis (PCA). Despite the better assessment of the genetic variability through the AFLP, significant modifications in clusters components were not observed, and only slight shifts in the positioning of isolates LRS 39/3 and 25M were observed in PCA plots. Furthermore, in both analyses, only the isolates from lemon plants revealed to be clustered, differently from the absence of clustering for other hosts or plant tissues. Summarizing, both RAPD and AFLP analyses were both efficient to detect the genetic variability within the population of the pathogenic fungus Alternaria spp., supplying information on the genetic variability of this species as a basis for further studies aiming the disease control.
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Endophytic colonization of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) by a novel competent bacterial endophyte, Pseudomonas putida strain P9, and its effect on associated bacterial communities.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2009
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Pseudomonas putida strain P9 is a novel competent endophyte from potato. P9 causes cultivar-dependent suppression of Phytophthora infestans. Colonization of the rhizoplane and endosphere of potato plants by P9 and its rifampin-resistant derivative P9R was studied. The purposes of this work were to follow the fate of P9 inside growing potato plants and to establish its effect on associated microbial communities. The effects of P9 and P9R inoculation were studied in two separate experiments. The roots of transplants of three different cultivars of potato were dipped in suspensions of P9 or P9R cells, and the plants were planted in soil. The fate of both strains was followed by examining colony growth and by performing PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Colonies of both strains were recovered from rhizoplane and endosphere samples of all three cultivars at two growth stages. A conspicuous band, representing P9 and P9R, was found in all Pseudomonas PCR-DGGE fingerprints for treated plants. The numbers of P9R CFU and the P9R-specific band intensities for the different replicate samples were positively correlated, as determined by linear regression analysis. The effects of plant growth stage, genotype, and the presence of P9R on associated microbial communities were examined by multivariate and unweighted-pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster analyses of PCR-DGGE fingerprints. The presence of strain P9R had an effect on bacterial groups identified as Pseudomonas azotoformans, Pseudomonas veronii, and Pseudomonas syringae. In conclusion, strain P9 is an avid colonizer of potato plants, competing with microbial populations indigenous to the potato phytosphere. Bacterization with a biocontrol agent has an important and previously unexplored effect on plant-associated communities.
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Culture-independent assessment of Rhizobiales-related alphaproteobacteria and the diversity of Methylobacterium in the rhizosphere and rhizoplane of transgenic eucalyptus.
Microb. Ecol.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2009
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The rhizosphere is an ecosystem exploited by a variety of organisms involved in plant health and environmental sustainability. Abiotic factors influence microorganism-plant interactions, but the microbial community is also affected by expression of heterologous genes from host plants. In the present work, we assessed the community shifts of Alphaproteobacteria phylogenetically related to the Rhizobiales order (Rhizobiales-like community) in rhizoplane and rhizosphere soils of wild-type and transgenic eucalyptus. A greenhouse experiment was performed and the bacterial communities associated with two wild-type (WT17 and WT18) and four transgenic (TR-9, TR-15, TR-22, and TR-23) eucalyptus plant lines were evaluated. The culture-independent approach consisted of the quantification, by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), of a targeted subset of Alphaproteobacteria and the assessment of its diversity using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Real-time quantification revealed a lesser density of the targeted community in TR-9 and TR-15 plants and diversity analysis by principal components analysis, based on PCR-DGGE, revealed differences between bacterial communities, not only between transgenic and nontransgenic plants, but also among wild-type plants. The comparison between clone libraries obtained from the transgenic plant TR-15 and wild-type WT17 revealed distinct bacterial communities associated with these plants. In addition, a culturable approach was used to quantify the Methylobacterium spp. in the samples where the identification of isolates, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, showed similarities to the species Methylobacterium nodulans, Methylobacterium isbiliense, Methylobacterium variable, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, and Methylobacterium radiotolerans. Colonies classified into this genus were not isolated from the rhizosphere but brought in culture from rhizoplane samples, except for one line of the transgenic plants (TR-15). In general, the data suggested that, in most cases, shifts in bacterial communities due to cultivation of transgenic plants are similar to those observed when different wild-type cultivars are compared, although shifts directly correlated to transgenic plant cultivation may be found.
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Assessing the diversity of bacterial communities associated with plants.
Braz. J. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2009
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Plant-bacteria interactions result from reciprocal recognition between both species. These interactions are responsible for essential biological processes in plant development and health status. Here, we present a review of the methodologies applied to investigate shifts in bacterial communities associated with plants. A description of techniques is made from initial isolations to culture-independent approaches focusing on quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction in real time (qPCR), Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), clone library construction and analysis, the application of multivariate analyses to microbial ecology data and the upcoming high throughput methodologies such as microarrays and pyrosequencing. This review supplies information about the development of traditional methods and a general overview about the new insights into bacterial communities associated with plants.
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Screening of Brazilian cacti rhizobacteria for plant growth promotion under drought.
Microbiol. Res.
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Drought is one of the major problems worldwide. The search for new and efficient microorganisms, from unexplored environments, to be used in association with plants to alleviate the negative effects imposed by water stress, is an interesting alternative. Thus, cacti-associated bacteria from the Brazilian semi-arid region were isolated based on their ability to grow in medium with reduced water availability. Strains were tested for the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS), as well as in vitro plant growth promotion traits. A great proportion of the isolates belong to the genus Bacillus. From a total of forty-eight bacteria, 65% were able to grow in medium with reduced water availability (0.919Aw), exopolysaccharide production was observed for 65% of the strains. The production of indole acetic acid (IAA) exceeding 51?gmL(-1) was observed for 4% and the high solubilization of Ca-P was verified for 6% of the isolates. No strain was able to produce hydrogen cyanide (HCN), 71% produced ammonia and 79% showed a halo of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) degradation. Zea mays L. growth promotion under water stress (30% of field capacity) was achieved by two strains of Bacillus spp. This is the first report to describe cacti-associated bacteria from Brazilian semi-arid with plant growth-promoting abilities.
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Structural and functional insights from the metagenome of an acidic hot spring microbial planktonic community in the Colombian Andes.
PLoS ONE
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A taxonomic and annotated functional description of microbial life was deduced from 53 Mb of metagenomic sequence retrieved from a planktonic fraction of the Neotropical high Andean (3,973 meters above sea level) acidic hot spring El Coquito (EC). A classification of unassembled metagenomic reads using different databases showed a high proportion of Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria (in total read affiliation), and through taxonomic affiliation of 16S rRNA gene fragments we observed the presence of Proteobacteria, micro-algae chloroplast and Firmicutes. Reads mapped against the genomes Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5, Legionella pneumophila str. Corby and Acidithiobacillus caldus revealed the presence of transposase-like sequences, potentially involved in horizontal gene transfer. Functional annotation and hierarchical comparison with different datasets obtained by pyrosequencing in different ecosystems showed that the microbial community also contained extensive DNA repair systems, possibly to cope with ultraviolet radiation at such high altitudes. Analysis of genes involved in the nitrogen cycle indicated the presence of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to N2 (narGHI, nirS, norBCDQ and nosZ), associated with Proteobacteria-like sequences. Genes involved in the sulfur cycle (cysDN, cysNC and aprA) indicated adenylsulfate and sulfite production that were affiliated to several bacterial species. In summary, metagenomic sequence data provided insight regarding the structure and possible functions of this hot spring microbial community, describing some groups potentially involved in the nitrogen and sulfur cycling in this environment.
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Plant growth promoting bacteria in Brachiaria brizantha.
World J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
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Brachiaria brizantha is considered one of the preferred fodders among farmers for having high forage yield and large production of root mass. The association of beneficial bacteria with these grasses can be very valuable in the recovery of the pasture areas with nutritional deficiency. With the aim of studying this possibility, we carried out the sampling of soil and roots of B. brizantha in three areas (Nova Odessa-SP, São Carlos-SP and Campo Verde-MT, Brazil). Seventy-two bacterial strains were isolated and used in tests to evaluate their biotechnological potential. Almost all isolates presented at least one positive feature. Sixty-eight isolates produced analogues of indole-3-acetic acid, ten showed nitrogenase activity when subjected to the method of increasing the concentration of total nitrogen (total N) in the culture medium and sixty-five isolates showed nitrogenase activity when subjected to acetylene reduction technique. The partial sequencing of 16S rRNA of these isolates allowed the identification of seven main groups, with the prevalence of those affiliated to the genus Stenotrophomonas (69 %). At the end, this work elected the strains C4 (Pseudomonadaceae) and C7 (Rhodospirillaceae) as promising organisms for the development of inoculants due to their higher nitrogenase activity.
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Abundance and genetic diversity of nifH gene sequences in anthropogenically affected Brazilian mangrove sediments.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
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Although mangroves represent ecosystems of global importance, the genetic diversity and abundance of functional genes that are key to their functioning scarcely have been explored. Here, we present a survey based on the nifH gene across transects of sediments of two mangrove systems located along the coast line of São Paulo state (Brazil) which differed by degree of disturbance, i.e., an oil-spill-affected and an unaffected mangrove. The diazotrophic communities were assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), quantitative PCR (qPCR), and clone libraries. The nifH gene abundance was similar across the two mangrove sediment systems, as evidenced by qPCR. However, the nifH-based PCR-DGGE profiles revealed clear differences between the mangroves. Moreover, shifts in the nifH gene diversities were noted along the land-sea transect within the previously oiled mangrove. The nifH gene diversity depicted the presence of nitrogen-fixing bacteria affiliated with a wide range of taxa, encompassing members of the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and also a group of anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria. We also detected a unique mangrove-specific cluster of sequences denoted Mgv-nifH. Our results indicate that nitrogen-fixing bacterial guilds can be partially endemic to mangroves, and these communities are modulated by oil contamination, which has important implications for conservation strategies.
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Cellulolytic bacteria from soils in harsh environments.
World J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
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It is believed that the exposure of organisms to harsh climate conditions may select for differential enzymatic activities, making the surviving organisms a very promising source for bioprospecting. Soil bacteria play an important role in degradation of organic matter, which is mostly due to their ability to decompose cellulose-based materials. This work focuses on the isolation and identification of cellulolytic bacteria from soil found in two environments with stressful climate conditions (Antarctica and the Brazilian semi-arid caatinga). Cellulolytic bacteria were selected using enrichments at high and low temperatures (4 or 60°C) in liquid media (trypic soy broth-TSB and minimum salt medium-MM) supplemented with cellulose (1%). Many of the isolates (119 out of 254-46.9%) displayed the ability to degrade carboxymethyl-cellulose, indicating the presence of endoglucolytic activity, while only a minority of these isolates (23 out of 254-9.1%) showed exoglucolytic activity (degradation of avicel). The obtained isolates revealed a preferential endoglucolytic activity according to the temperature of enrichments. Also, the identification of some isolates by partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the Bacteroidetes (e.g., Pedobacter, Chryseobacterium and Flavobacterium) were the main phylum of cellulolytic bacteria isolated from soil in Antarctica; the Firmicutes (e.g., Bacillus) were more commonly isolated from samples from the caatinga; and Actinobacteria were found in both types of soil (e.g., Microbacterium and Arthrobacter). In conclusion, this work reports the isolation of bacteria able to degrade cellulose-based material from soil at very low or very high temperatures, a finding that should be further explored in the search for cellulolytic enzymes to be used in the bioenergy industry.
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The microbiome of Brazilian mangrove sediments as revealed by metagenomics.
PLoS ONE
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Here we embark in a deep metagenomic survey that revealed the taxonomic and potential metabolic pathways aspects of mangrove sediment microbiology. The extraction of DNA from sediment samples and the direct application of pyrosequencing resulted in approximately 215 Mb of data from four distinct mangrove areas (BrMgv01 to 04) in Brazil. The taxonomic approaches applied revealed the dominance of Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria in the samples. Paired statistical analysis showed higher proportions of specific taxonomic groups in each dataset. The metabolic reconstruction indicated the possible occurrence of processes modulated by the prevailing conditions found in mangrove sediments. In terms of carbon cycling, the sequences indicated the prevalence of genes involved in the metabolism of methane, formaldehyde, and carbon dioxide. With respect to the nitrogen cycle, evidence for sequences associated with dissimilatory reduction of nitrate, nitrogen immobilization, and denitrification was detected. Sequences related to the production of adenylsulfate, sulfite, and H(2)S were relevant to the sulphur cycle. These data indicate that the microbial core involved in methane, nitrogen, and sulphur metabolism consists mainly of Burkholderiaceae, Planctomycetaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Desulfobacteraceae. Comparison of our data to datasets from soil and sea samples resulted in the allotment of the mangrove sediments between those samples. The results of this study add valuable data about the composition of microbial communities in mangroves and also shed light on possible transformations promoted by microbial organisms in mangrove sediments.
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Cyanobacterial diversity in the phyllosphere of a mangrove forest.
FEMS Microbiol. Ecol.
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The cyanobacterial community colonizing phyllosphere in a well-preserved Brazilian mangrove ecosystem was assessed using cultivation-independent molecular approaches. Leaves of trees that occupy this environment (Rhizophora mangle,Avicennia schaueriana and Laguncularia racemosa) were collected along a transect beginning at the margin of the bay and extending upland. The results demonstrated that the phyllosphere of R. mangle and L. racemosa harbor similar assemblages of cyanobacteria at each point along the transect. A. schaueriana, found only in the coastal portions of the transect, was colonized by assemblages with lower richness than the other trees. However, the results indicated that spatial location was a stronger driver of cyanobacterial community composition than plant species. Distinct cyanobacterial communities were observed at each location along the coast-to-upland transect. Clone library analysis allowed identification of 19 genera of cyanobacteria and demonstrated the presence of several uncultivated taxa. A predominance of sequences affiliated with the orders Nostocales and Oscillatoriales was observed, with a remarkable number of sequences similar to genera Symphyonemopsis/Brasilonema (order Nostocales). The results demonstrated that phyllosphere cyanobacteria in this mangrove forest ecosystem are influenced by environmental conditions as the primary driver at the ecosystem scale, with tree species exerting some effect on community structure at the local scale.
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Analysis of 16S rRNA and mxaF genes revealing insights into Methylobacterium niche-specific plant association.
Genet. Mol. Biol.
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The genus Methylobacterium comprises pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic (PPFM) bacteria, known to be an important plant-associated bacterial group. Species of this group, described as plant-nodulating, have the dual capacity of producing cytokinin and enzymes, such as pectinase and cellulase, involved in systemic resistance induction and nitrogen fixation under specific plant environmental conditions. The aim hereby was to evaluate the phylogenetic distribution of Methylobacterium spp. isolates from different host plants. Thus, a comparative analysis between sequences from structural (16S rRNA) and functional mxaF (which codifies for a subunit of the enzyme methanol dehydrogenase) ubiquitous genes, was undertaken. Notably, some Methylobacterium spp. isolates are generalists through colonizing more than one host plant, whereas others are exclusively found in certain specific plant-species. Congruency between phylogeny and specific host inhabitance was higher in the mxaF gene than in the 16S rRNA, a possible indication of function-based selection in this niche. Therefore, in a first stage, plant colonization by Methylobacterium spp. could represent generalist behavior, possibly related to microbial competition and adaptation to a plant environment. Otherwise, niche-specific colonization is apparently impelled by the host plant.
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Interspecific variation of the bacterial community structure in the phyllosphere of the three major plant components of mangrove forests.
Braz. J. Microbiol.
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Mangrove forests encompass a group of trees species that inhabit the intertidal zones, where soil is characterized by the high salinity and low availability of oxygen. The phyllosphere of these trees represent the habitat provided on the aboveground parts of plants, supporting in a global scale, a large and complex microbial community. The structure of phyllosphere communities reflects immigration, survival and growth of microbial colonizers, which is influenced by numerous environmental factors in addition to leaf physical and chemical properties. Here, a combination of culture-base methods with PCR-DGGE was applied to test whether local or plant specific factors shape the bacterial community of the phyllosphere from three plant species (Avicenia shaueriana, Laguncularia racemosa and Rhizophora mangle), found in two mangroves. The number of bacteria in the phyllosphere of these plants varied between 3.62 x 10(4) in A. schaeriana and 6.26 x 10(3) in R. mangle. The results obtained by PCR-DGGE and isolation approaches were congruent and demonstrated that each plant species harbor specific bacterial communities in their leaves surfaces. Moreover, the ordination of environmental factors (mangrove and plant species), by redundancy analysis (RDA), also indicated that the selection exerted by plant species is higher than mangrove location on bacterial communities at phyllosphere.
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Bacterial genomes: habitat specificity and uncharted organisms.
Microb. Ecol.
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The capability and speed in generating genomic data have increased profoundly since the release of the draft human genome in 2000. Additionally, sequencing costs have continued to plummet as the next generation of highly efficient sequencing technologies (next-generation sequencing) became available and commercial facilities promote market competition. However, new challenges have emerged as researchers attempt to efficiently process the massive amounts of sequence data being generated. First, the described genome sequences are unequally distributed among the branches of bacterial life and, second, bacterial pan-genomes are often not considered when setting aims for sequencing projects. Here, we propose that scientists should be concerned with attaining an improved equal representation of most of the bacterial tree of life organisms, at the genomic level. Moreover, they should take into account the natural variation that is often observed within bacterial species and the role of the often changing surrounding environment and natural selection pressures, which is central to bacterial speciation and genome evolution. Not only will such efforts contribute to our overall understanding of the microbial diversity extant in ecosystems as well as the structuring of the extant genomes, but they will also facilitate the development of better methods for (meta)genome annotation.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.