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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Matrix method for acoustic levitation simulation.
IEEE Trans Ultrason Ferroelectr Freq Control
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2011
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A matrix method is presented for simulating acoustic levitators. A typical acoustic levitator consists of an ultrasonic transducer and a reflector. The matrix method is used to determine the potential for acoustic radiation force that acts on a small sphere in the standing wave field produced by the levitator. The method is based on the Rayleigh integral and it takes into account the multiple reflections that occur between the transducer and the reflector. The potential for acoustic radiation force obtained by the matrix method is validated by comparing the matrix method results with those obtained by the finite element method when using an axisymmetric model of a single-axis acoustic levitator. After validation, the method is applied in the simulation of a noncontact manipulation system consisting of two 37.9-kHz Langevin-type transducers and a plane reflector. The manipulation system allows control of the horizontal position of a small levitated sphere from -6 mm to 6 mm, which is done by changing the phase difference between the two transducers. The horizontal position of the sphere predicted by the matrix method agrees with the horizontal positions measured experimentally with a charge-coupled device camera. The main advantage of the matrix method is that it allows simulation of non-symmetric acoustic levitators without requiring much computational effort.
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Identification of elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants in piezoceramic disks.
IEEE Trans Ultrason Ferroelectr Freq Control
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2010
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Three-dimensional modeling of piezoelectric devices requires a precise knowledge of piezoelectric material parameters. The commonly used piezoelectric materials belong to the 6mm symmetry class, which have ten independent constants. In this work, a methodology to obtain precise material constants over a wide frequency band through finite element analysis of a piezoceramic disk is presented. Given an experimental electrical impedance curve and a first estimate for the piezoelectric material properties, the objective is to find the material properties that minimize the difference between the electrical impedance calculated by the finite element method and that obtained experimentally by an electrical impedance analyzer. The methodology consists of four basic steps: experimental measurement, identification of vibration modes and their sensitivity to material constants, a preliminary identification algorithm, and final refinement of the material constants using an optimization algorithm. The application of the methodology is exemplified using a hard lead zirconate titanate piezoceramic. The same methodology is applied to a soft piezoceramic. The errors in the identification of each parameter are statistically estimated in both cases, and are less than 0.6% for elastic constants, and less than 6.3% for dielectric and piezoelectric constants.
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Ultrasonic viscosity measurement using the shear-wave reflection coefficient with a novel signal processing technique.
IEEE Trans Ultrason Ferroelectr Freq Control
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2010
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Real-time viscosity measurement remains a necessity for highly automated industry. To resolve this problem, many studies have been carried out using an ultrasonic shear wave reflectance method. This method is based on the determination of the complex reflection coefficients magnitude and phase at the solid-liquid interface. Although magnitude is a stable quantity and its measurement is relatively simple and precise, phase measurement is a difficult task because of strong temperature dependence. A simplified method that uses only the magnitude of the reflection coefficient and that is valid under the Newtonian regimen has been proposed by some authors, but the obtained viscosity values do not match conventional viscometry measurements. In this work, a mode conversion measurement cell was used to measure glycerin viscosity as a function of temperature (15 to 25 degrees C) and corn syrup-water mixtures as a function of concentration (70 to 100 wt% of corn syrup). Tests were carried out at 1 MHz. A novel signal processing technique that calculates the reflection coefficient magnitude in a frequency band, instead of a single frequency, was studied. The effects of the bandwidth on magnitude and viscosity were analyzed and the results were compared with the values predicted by the Newtonian liquid model. The frequency band technique improved the magnitude results. The obtained viscosity values came close to those measured by the rotational viscometer with percentage errors up to 14%, whereas errors up to 96% were found for the single frequency method.
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Computational method to determine reflected ultrasonic signals from arbitrary-geometry targets.
IEEE Trans Ultrason Ferroelectr Freq Control
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2010
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A computational method based on the impulse response and on the discrete representation computational concept is proposed for the determination of the echo responses from arbitrary-geometry targets. It is supposed that each point of the transducer aperture can be considered as a source radiating hemispherical waves to the reflector. The local interaction with each of the hemispherical waves at the reflector surface can be modeled as a plane wave impinging on a planar surface, using the respective reflection coefficient. The method is valid for all field regions and can be performed for any excitation waveform radiated from an arbitrary acoustic aperture. The effects of target geometry, position, and material on both the amplitude and the shape of the echo response are studied. The model is compared with experimental results obtained using broadband transducers together with plane and cylindrical concave rectangular reflectors (aluminum, brass, and acrylic), as well as a circular cavity placed on a plane surface, in a water medium. The method can predict the measured echoes accurately. This paper shows an improved approach of the method, considering the reflection coefficient for all incident hemispherical waves arriving at each point of the target surface.
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Finite element analysis and optimization of a single-axis acoustic levitator.
IEEE Trans Ultrason Ferroelectr Freq Control
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2010
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A finite element analysis and a parametric optimization of single-axis acoustic levitators are presented. The finite element method is used to simulate a levitator consisting of a Langevin ultrasonic transducer with a plane radiating surface and a plane reflector. The transducer electrical impedance, the transducer face displacement, and the acoustic radiation potential that acts on small spheres are determined by the finite element method. The numerical electrical impedance is compared with that acquired experimentally by an impedance analyzer, and the predicted displacement is compared with that obtained by a fiber-optic vibration sensor. The numerical acoustic radiation potential is verified experimentally by placing small spheres in the levitator. The same procedure is used to optimize a levitator consisting of a curved reflector and a concave-faced transducer. The numerical results show that the acoustic radiation force in the new levitator is enhanced 604 times compared with the levitator consisting of a plane transducer and a plane reflector. The optimized levitator is able to levitate 3, 2.5-mm diameter steel spheres with a power consumption of only 0.9 W.
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Modeling of functionally graded piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers.
Ultrasonics
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2009
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The application of functionally graded material (FGM) concept to piezoelectric transducers allows the design of composite transducers without interfaces, due to the continuous change of property values. Thus, large improvements can be achieved, as reduction of stress concentration, increasing of bonding strength, and bandwidth. This work proposes to design and to model FGM piezoelectric transducers and to compare their performance with non-FGM ones. Analytical and finite element (FE) modeling of FGM piezoelectric transducers radiating a plane pressure wave in fluid medium are developed and their results are compared. The ANSYS software is used for the FE modeling. The analytical model is based on FGM-equivalent acoustic transmission-line model, which is implemented using MATLAB software. Two cases are considered: (i) the transducer emits a pressure wave in water and it is composed of a graded piezoceramic disk, and backing and matching layers made of homogeneous materials; (ii) the transducer has no backing and matching layer; in this case, no external load is simulated. Time and frequency pressure responses are obtained through a transient analysis. The material properties are graded along thickness direction. Linear and exponential gradation functions are implemented to illustrate the influence of gradation on the transducer pressure response, electrical impedance, and resonance frequencies.
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Transthoracic cardiac ultrasonic stimulation induces a negative chronotropic effect.
IEEE Trans Ultrason Ferroelectr Freq Control
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The objective of this study is to investigate cardiac bioeffects resulting from ultrasonic stimulation using a specific set of acoustical parameters. Ten Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and exposed to 1-MHz ultrasound pulses of 3-MPa peak rarefactional pressure and approximately 1% duty factor. The pulse repetition frequency started slightly above the heart rate and was decreased by 1 Hz every 10 s, for a total exposure duration of 30 s. The control group was composed of five rats. Two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures and Bonferroni post hoc tests were used to compare heart rate and ejection fraction, which was used as an index of myocardial contractility. It was demonstrated for the first time that transthoracic ultrasound has the potential to decrease the heart rate by ~20%. The negative chronotropic effect lasted for at least 15 min after ultrasound exposure and there was no apparent gross damage to the cardiac tissue.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.