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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) Consensus Review for Uterine Serous Carcinoma.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2014
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Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) represents a rare and aggressive histologic subtype of endometrial cancer, associated with a poor prognosis. This article critically reviews the literature pertinent to the epidemiology, pathology, molecular biology, diagnosis, management, and perspectives of patients with USC.
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Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) Consensus Review for Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2014
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Most women diagnosed with malignant ovarian germ cell tumors have curable disease and experience excellent survival with manageable treatment-associated morbidity, related both to tumor biology and improvements in treatment over the last 4 decades. Malignant ovarian germ cell tumors occur predominantly in girls, adolescents, and young women and are often unilateral tumors of early stage, although advanced-stage disease occurs in approximately 30% of patients. Tumors are usually chemosensitive, thereby allowing fertility-sparing surgery in most women with high chance of cure. Differences in practice do exist among providers in various subspecialties and geographic areas. In most settings, collaborative efforts among specialties allow the optimal treatment of women with these rare tumors, and implementation of standard guidelines at an international level should translate to effective clinical trial design, rapid accrual to clinical trials, and universally improved patient outcomes.This consensus guideline represents a summary of recommendations for diagnosis and management that has been agreed upon by cooperative groups worldwide. It builds upon individual publications including previously published summary documents and provides the most current practice standards validated worldwide.
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Outpatient rapid 4-step desensitization for gynecologic oncology patients with mild to low-risk, moderate hypersensitivity reactions to carboplatin/cisplatin.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2014
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The primary objective of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of an outpatient, 4-step, one-solution desensitization protocol in gynecologic oncology patients with history of mild to low-risk, moderate hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to platinums (carboplatin and cisplatin).
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Imaging across the life span: innovations in imaging and therapy for gynecologic cancer.
Radiographics
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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The focus of this article is radiation therapy for gynecologic cancers, with emphasis on imaging-based treatment planning and delivery. For the various gynecologic cancers, radiation oncologists rely on essential clinical information to triage treatment options, and various imaging studies are performed for treatment planning and radiation therapy delivery. A practical approach is provided to help radiologists tailor their reports for the needs of their radiation oncology and gynecologic oncology colleagues, to optimize multidisciplinary care for patients with gynecologic cancer. Template radiology reports are proposed to address the specific information needs of oncologists at each phase-before, during, and after treatment. Fueled by the rapid progress in engineering and computer sciences during the past 2 decades, remarkable advances have been made in anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging and in radiation treatment planning and delivery in patients with gynecologic cancer. Radiation therapy has evolved from a nontargeted approach to a precisely targeted, highly conformal treatment modality, to further improve treatment outcomes and reduce morbidity. High-quality imaging has become essential for staging of the disease, delineation of tumor extent for treatment planning and delivery, and monitoring therapy response. Anatomic and functional imaging has also been shown to provide prognostic information that allows clinicians to tailor therapy on the basis of personalized patient information. This field is an area of active research, and future clinical trials are warranted to validate preliminary results in the field.
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Does intra-operative radiation at the time of pelvic exenteration improve survival for patients with recurrent, previously irradiated cervical, vaginal, or vulvar cancer?
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2014
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To determine whether intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT) at the time of pelvic exenteration (PE) or laterally extended endopelvic resection (LEER) improves progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with recurrent, previously irradiated gynecologic cancers.
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DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.
Ana Osorio, Roger L Milne, Karoline Kuchenbaecker, Tereza Vaclová, Guillermo Pita, Rosario Alonso, Paolo Peterlongo, Ignacio Blanco, Miguel de la Hoya, Mercedes Durán, Orland Díez, Teresa Ramón Y Cajal, Irene Konstantopoulou, Cristina Martinez-Bouzas, Raquel Andrés Conejero, Penny Soucy, Lesley McGuffog, Daniel Barrowdale, Andrew Lee, Swe-Brca, Brita Arver, Johanna Rantala, Niklas Loman, Hans Ehrencrona, Olufunmilayo I Olopade, Mary S Beattie, Susan M Domchek, Katherine Nathanson, Timothy R Rebbeck, Banu K Arun, Beth Y Karlan, Christine Walsh, Jenny Lester, Esther M John, Alice S Whittemore, Mary B Daly, Melissa Southey, John Hopper, Mary B Terry, Saundra S Buys, Ramunas Janavicius, Cecilia M Dorfling, Elizabeth J van Rensburg, Linda Steele, Susan L Neuhausen, Yuan Chun Ding, Thomas V O Hansen, Lars Jønson, Bent Ejlertsen, Anne-Marie Gerdes, Mar Infante, Belen Herráez, Leticia Thais Moreno, Jeffrey N Weitzel, Josef Herzog, Kisa Weeman, Siranoush Manoukian, Bernard Peissel, Daniela Zaffaroni, Giulietta Scuvera, Bernardo Bonanni, Frederique Mariette, Sara Volorio, Alessandra Viel, Liliana Varesco, Laura Papi, Laura Ottini, Maria Grazia Tibiletti, Paolo Radice, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Judy Garber, Steve Ellis, Debra Frost, Radka Platte, Elena Fineberg, Gareth Evans, Fiona Lalloo, Louise Izatt, Ros Eeles, Julian Adlard, Rosemarie Davidson, Trevor Cole, Diana Eccles, Jackie Cook, Shirley Hodgson, Carole Brewer, Marc Tischkowitz, Fiona Douglas, Mary Porteous, Lucy Side, Lisa Walker, Patrick Morrison, Alan Donaldson, John Kennedy, Claire Foo, Andrew K Godwin, Rita Katharina Schmutzler, Barbara Wappenschmidt, Kerstin Rhiem, Christoph Engel, Alfons Meindl, Nina Ditsch, Norbert Arnold, Hans Jörg Plendl, Dieter Niederacher, Christian Sutter, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Doris Steinemann, Sabine Preisler-Adams, Karin Kast, Raymonda Varon-Mateeva, Andrea Gehrig, Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet, Olga M Sinilnikova, Sylvie Mazoyer, Francesca Damiola, Bruce Poppe, Kathleen Claes, Marion Piedmonte, Kathy Tucker, Floor Backes, Gustavo Rodriguez, Wendy Brewster, Katie Wakeley, Thomas Rutherford, Trinidad Caldés, Heli Nevanlinna, Kristiina Aittomäki, Matti A Rookus, Theo A M van Os, Lizet van der Kolk, J L de Lange, Hanne E J Meijers-Heijboer, A H van der Hout, Christi J van Asperen, Encarna B Gomez Garcia, Nicoline Hoogerbrugge, J Margriet Collée, Carolien H M van Deurzen, Rob B van der Luijt, Peter Devilee, Hebon, Edith Olah, Conxi Lazaro, Alex Teulé, Mireia Menéndez, Anna Jakubowska, Cezary Cybulski, Jacek Gronwald, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Durda, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Oskar Th Johannsson, Christine Maugard, Marco Montagna, Silvia Tognazzo, Manuel R Teixeira, Sue Healey, Kconfab Investigators, Curtis Olswold, Lucia Guidugli, Noralane Lindor, Susan Slager, Csilla I Szabo, Joseph Vijai, Mark Robson, Noah Kauff, Liying Zhang, Rohini Rau-Murthy, Anneliese Fink-Retter, Christian F Singer, Christine Rappaport, Daphne Geschwantler Kaulich, Georg Pfeiler, Muy-Kheng Tea, Andreas Berger, Catherine M Phelan, Mark H Greene, Phuong L Mai, Flavio Lejbkowicz, Irene Andrulis, Anna Marie Mulligan, Gord Glendon, Amanda Ewart Toland, Anders Bojesen, Inge Sokilde Pedersen, Lone Sunde, Mads Thomassen, Torben A Kruse, Uffe Birk Jensen, Eitan Friedman, Yael Laitman, Shani Paluch Shimon, Jacques Simard, Douglas F Easton, Kenneth Offit, Fergus J Couch, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Antonis C Antoniou, Javier Benitez.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2014
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Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase), and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2). Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2) gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03-1.16), p = 2.7 × 10(-3)) for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase) gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, p = 4.8 × 10(-3)). DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied.
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Training the Next Generation of Robotic Surgeons Using Guided Mentorship: A Randomized Controlled Trial.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2014
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To evaluate the effect of expert guided mentorship on technical score and time for a set of robotic training drills.
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Feasibility of interval cytoreduction following neoadjuvant chemotherapy with carboplatin, weekly paclitaxel, and bevacizumab for advanced ovarian cancer--a phase 1 study.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2014
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The objective of this study was to determine a dosing schedule of neoadjuvant chemotherapy using carboplatin, paclitaxel, and bevacizumab in women with advanced ovarian cancer, evaluating feasibility and outcomes from interval cytoreductive surgery (ICS).
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Hysterectomy for the treatment of gynecologic malignancy.
Clin Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2014
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The current literature shows that minimally invasive hysterectomy for cancer is relatively safe and provides benefits in terms of blood loss and length of stay with less or equal complication rates over laparotomy. These benefits may even be greater in the morbidly obese and those with other comorbidities. Available techniques include laparotomy, laparoscopy, single-site laparoscopy, robotics, and single-site robotics. Collection of comprehensive and reliable data on complications and outcomes will prove to be the key in defining the role of new techniques in the treatment of women with gynecologic malignancies.
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Mismatch repair protein expression in 1049 endometrial carcinomas, associations with body mass index, and other clinicopathologic variables.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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Links between obesity, with its attendant estrogen abnormalities, and the endometrial carcinoma (EC) DNA Mismatch Repair Protein (MMR) system have recently been proposed. We investigated relationships between body mass index (BMI) and clinicopathological correlates including MMR expression in a large single institution EC cohort.
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Reducing readmissions after robotic surgical management of endometrial cancer:A potential for improved quality care.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2013
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To describe readmission patterns after robotic surgery for endometrial cancer and identify risk factors for readmission within 90days of discharge.
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Should bevacizumab be continued after progression on bevacizumab in recurrent ovarian cancer?
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 05-04-2013
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The optimal role of bevacizumab (Bev) in the treatment of ovarian cancer has not yet been established. Furthermore, it is unclear whether there is a benefit of Bev after progression on a Bev-containing regimen in ovarian cancer. The objective of this study was to compare response rates, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival between patients who were treated with chemotherapy and Bev after progression on Bev (BAB) versus patients who were treated with chemotherapy without Bev (CWOB).
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Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the uterine cervix: the role of multimodality therapy in early-stage disease.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2013
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Neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) of the cervix comprise only 2% of all cervical cancers. Prospective data is limited and treatment guidelines rely on retrospective reviews and literature from lung NEC. The objective of this study was to report our experience in the management of this rare disease.
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The impact of body weight on ovarian cancer outcomes.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2011
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Obesity is a known risk factor and poor prognostic factor for many comorbidities including cancer. However, the influence of body mass index (BMI) on ovarian cancer outcomes is inconclusive. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of BMI and weight changes on survival in patients with advanced ovarian cancer after primary treatment.
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Endometrial cancer patients and compliance with genetic counseling: room for improvement.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2011
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Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for the presence or absence of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in tumor samples is a quick and relatively inexpensive method to screen for Lynch syndrome (LS). At our institution we have found that >20% of patients lack expression of MMR proteins and >10% would be expected to benefit from genetic counseling (GC). However, compliance with referral to GC is poor. Therefore, we set out to analyze the reasons for noncompliance, hypothesizing that it could be due to a perception of a low risk for developing other cancers.
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Lynch syndrome.
Clin Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2011
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Almost 100 years ago Lynch syndrome was discovered by Dr Aldred Warthin. Initially, the syndrome was named Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer as colorectal cancer seemed most prevalent. Over time uterine cancer and several other malignancies were recognized as part of the spectrum. This autosomal-dominant inherited cancer syndrome is characterized by a defect in mismatch repair genes and puts patients at a significantly increased risk for colorectal and uterine cancer. Recognition and diagnosis of Lynch syndrome is extremely important so that appropriate screening programs and/or risk-reducing surgery can be initiated to prevent development or promote early detection of cancers.
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Posttreatment surveillance and diagnosis of recurrence in women with gynecologic malignancies: Society of Gynecologic Oncologists recommendations.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2011
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Although gynecologic cancers account for only 10% of all new cancer cases in women, these cancers account for 20% of all female cancer survivors. Improvements in cancer care have resulted in almost 10 million cancer survivors, and this number is expected to grow. Therefore, determining the most cost-effective clinical surveillance for detection of recurrence is critical. Unfortunately, there has been a paucity of research in what are the most cost-effective strategies for surveillance once patients have achieved a complete response. Currently, most recommendations are based on retrospective studies and expert opinion. Taking a thorough history, performing a thorough examination, and educating cancer survivors about concerning symptoms is the most effective method for the detection of most gynecologic cancer recurrences. There is very little evidence that routine cytologic procedures or imaging improves the ability to detect gynecologic cancer recurrence at a stage that will impact cure or response rates to salvage therapy. This article will review the most recent data on surveillance for gynecologic cancer recurrence in women who have had a complete response to primary cancer therapy.
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Addition of bevacizumab to weekly paclitaxel significantly improves progression-free survival in heavily pretreated recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2011
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Weekly paclitaxel has been shown to be an effective cytotoxic regimen for recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), and may act through inhibition of angiogenesis. Bevacizumab, a potent angiogenesis inhibitor, has also been shown to have activity in patients with EOC. Therefore, we sought to determine if the addition of bevacizumab to weekly paclitaxel led to an increased survival compared to weekly paclitaxel alone.
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Lynch syndrome screening strategies among newly diagnosed endometrial cancer patients.
Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2009
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To estimate the cost-effectiveness of screening strategies for Lynch syndrome among newly diagnosed endometrial cancer patients.
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Are prediction models for Lynch syndrome valid for probands with endometrial cancer?
Fam. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2009
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Currently, three prediction models are used to predict a patients risk of having Lynch syndrome (LS). These models have been validated in probands with colorectal cancer (CRC), but not in probands presenting with endometrial cancer (EMC). Thus, the aim was to determine the performance of these prediction models in women with LS presenting with EMC. Probands with EMC and LS were identified. Personal and family history was entered into three prediction models, PREMM(1,2), MMRpro, and MMRpredict. Probabilities of mutations in the mismatch repair genes were recorded. Accurate prediction was defined as a model predicting at least a 5% chance of a proband carrying a mutation. From 562 patients prospectively enrolled in a clinical trial of patients with EMC, 13 (2.2%) were shown to have LS. Nine patients had a mutation in MSH6, three in MSH2, and one in MLH1. MMRpro predicted that 3 of 9 patients with an MSH6, 3 of 3 with an MSH2, and 1 of 1 patient with an MLH1 mutation could have LS. For MMRpredict, EMC coded as "proximal CRC" predicted 5 of 5, and as "distal CRC" three of five. PREMM(1,2) predicted that 4 of 4 with an MLH1 or MSH2 could have LS. Prediction of LS in probands presenting with EMC using current models for probands with CRC works reasonably well. Further studies are needed to develop models that include questions specific to patients with EMC with a greater age range, as well as placing increased emphasis on prediction of LS in probands with MSH6 mutations.
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Prospective evaluation of DNA mismatch repair protein expression in primary endometrial cancer.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2009
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Immunohistochemical (IHC) stains for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins help screen for Lynch syndrome and identify microsatellite unstable colorectal carcinomas, providing prognostic information. It has been suggested that colorectal and endometrial carcinomas should be screened routinely for a MMR defect, but data are lacking on the practical application of this policy. We report our experience with the prospective evaluation of MMR protein expression in endometrial cancer.
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Analysis of disease recurrence and survival for women with uterine malignancies undergoing robotic surgery.
Gynecol. Oncol.
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To evaluate recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) for patients who underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy (RALH) for uterine malignancies.
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Complications after double-barreled wet colostomy compared to separate urinary and fecal diversion during pelvic exenteration: time to change back?
Gynecol. Oncol.
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To assess complications associated with double-barreled wet colostomy (DBWC) in the first six months after pelvic exenteration as compared to separate urinary and fecal diversion (SUD).
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Recurrent ovarian cancer: is there a role for re-treatment with bevacizumab after an initial complete response to a bevacizumab-containing regimen?
Gynecol. Oncol.
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To compare the progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) who received Bev after Bev (BAB) vs. those who were not re-treated with Bev (NOTBev) after initially experiencing a complete response (CR) to a Bev-containing regimen (BCR).
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Short- and long-term morbidity and outcomes after robotic surgery for comprehensive endometrial cancer staging.
Gynecol. Oncol.
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Although intra-operative and immediate postoperative complications of robotic surgery are relatively low, little is known about long-term morbidity. We set out to assess both short- and long-term morbidities after robotic surgery for endometrial cancer staging.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.