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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Emerging drugs for the treatment of diabetic ulcers.
Expert Opin Emerg Drugs
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2013
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Diabetic ulcers are chronic nonhealing ulcerations that despite the available medical tools still result in high amputation rates. Growing evidence suggests that alteration of the biochemical milieu of the chronic wound plays a significant role in impaired diabetic wound healing.
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Aliskiren improves vascular smooth muscle function in the skin microcirculation of type 2 diabetic patients with normal renal function.
J Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone Syst
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2013
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OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper is to study the effect of aliskiren on metabolic parameters and micro- and macrovascular reactivity in individuals diagnosed with or at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).Research design and methods:We studied 47 T2DM and 41 at-risk individuals in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. All subjects were treated with 150 mg aliskiren or placebo daily for 12 weeks. Twenty-six (55%) of T2DM and four (8%) at-risk subjects were also treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers. RESULTS: Aliskiren treatment was associated with improvement in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and endothelium-independent vasodilation at the skin microcirculation in those with T2DM but not in those at risk. There were no incidences of hypotension and no significant changes in serum potassium or creatinine levels with aliskiren treatment in either study group. CONCLUSIONS: Aliskiren improves blood pressure and vascular smooth muscle function in the skin microcirculation of T2DM patients.
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Postexercise phosphocreatine recovery, an index of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, is reduced in diabetic patients with lower extremity complications.
J. Vasc. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2013
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To identify differences in postexercise phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery, an index of mitochondrial function, in diabetic patients with and without lower extremity complications.
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Increased skin inflammation and blood vessel density in human and experimental diabetes.
Int J Low Extrem Wounds
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2013
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Systemic inflammation is associated with impaired wound healing in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Using immunohistochemistry techniques, the authors investigated changes in skin inflammation and skin blood vessels in human and experimental diabetes. Comparing to the non-DM human subjects, the total number of inflammatory cells per biopsy and the number of inflammatory cells around blood vessels, a strong indication of inflammation, were higher in DM subjects irrespective of their risk for developing diabetic foot ulcer. Inflammatory cell infiltration was robustly increased in all DM animal models compared with their non-DM controls. The number and density of blood vessels and CD31 positive proliferating endothelial cells around preexisting skin vessels was also higher in the DM patients. However, there were no differences in the skin blood flow between the non-DM and DM subjects. The number of skin blood vessels was also increased in the DM animals; however, these differences were less obvious than the ones observed for inflammatory cells. We conclude that skin inflammation and skin blood vessel density is increased in diabetic human subjects and in rodent and rabbit models of diabetes.
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Role of endothelial progenitor cells and inflammatory cytokines in healing of diabetic foot ulcers.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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To evaluate changes in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and cytokines in patients with diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) in association with wound healing.
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Molecular biomarkers of vascular dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Untreated and long-lasting obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may lead to important vascular abnormalities, including endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. We observed a correlation between microcirculatory reactivity and endothelium-dependent release of nitric oxide in OSA patients. Therefore, we hypothesized that OSA affects (micro)vasculature and we aimed to identify vascular gene targets of OSA that could possibly serve as reliable biomarkers of severity of the disease and possibly of vascular risk. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we evaluated gene expression in skin biopsies of OSA patients, mouse aortas from animals exposed to 4-week intermittent hypoxia (IH; rapid oscillations in oxygen desaturation and reoxygenation), and human dermal microvascular (HMVEC) and coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) cultured under IH. We demonstrate a significant upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3; A20), hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1??? and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in skin biopsies obtained from OSA patients with severe nocturnal hypoxemia (nadir saturated oxygen levels [SaO2]<75%) compared to mildly hypoxemic OSA patients (SaO2 75%-90%) and a significant upregulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) expression compared to control subjects. Gene expression profile in aortas of mice exposed to IH demonstrated a significant upregulation of eNOS and VEGF. In an in vitro model of OSA, IH increased expression of A20 and decreased eNOS and HIF-1? expression in HMVEC, while increased A20, VCAM-1 and HIF-1?expression in HCAEC, indicating that EC in culture originating from distinct vascular beds respond differently to IH stress. We conclude that gene expression profiles in skin of OSA patients may correlate with disease severity and, if validated by further studies, could possibly predict vascular risk in OSA patients.
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Treating diabetic ulcers.
Expert Opin Pharmacother
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2011
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Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious secondary complication of diabetes mellitus and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature. Thus, addressing all of the factors involved remains instrumental in wound healing.
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Mechanisms involved in the development and healing of diabetic foot ulceration.
Diabetes
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We examined the role of vascular function and inflammation in the development and failure to heal diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). We followed 104 diabetic patients for a period of 18.4 ± 10.8 months. At the beginning of the study, we evaluated vascular reactivity and serum inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. DFUs developed in 30 (29%) patients. DFU patients had more severe neuropathy, higher white blood cell count, and lower endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation in the macrocirculation. Complete ulcer healing was achieved in 16 (53%) patients, whereas 13 (47%) patients did not heal. There were no differences in the above parameters between the two groups, but patients whose ulcers failed to heal had higher tumor necrosis factor-?, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9), and fibroblast growth factor 2 serum levels when compared with those who healed. Skin biopsy analysis showed that compared with control subjects, diabetic patients had increased immune cell infiltration, expression of MMP-9, and protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B), which negatively regulates the signaling of insulin, leptin, and growth factors. We conclude that increased inflammation, expression of MMP-9, PTP1B, and aberrant growth factor levels are the main factors associated with failure to heal DFUs. Targeting these factors may prove helpful in the management of DFUs.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.