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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Gallic acid is the major component of grape seed extract that inhibits amyloid fibril formation.
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2013
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Many protein misfolding diseases, for example, Alzheimers, Parkinsons and Huntingtons, are characterised by the accumulation of protein aggregates in an amyloid fibrillar form. Natural products which inhibit fibril formation are a promising avenue to explore as therapeutics for the treatment of these diseases. In this study we have shown, using in vitro thioflavin T assays and transmission electron microscopy, that grape seed extract inhibits fibril formation of kappa-casein (?-CN), a milk protein which forms amyloid fibrils spontaneously under physiological conditions. Among the components of grape seed extract, gallic acid was the most active component at inhibiting ?-CN fibril formation, by stabilizing ?-CN to prevent its aggregation. Concomitantly, gallic acid significantly reduced the toxicity of ?-CN to pheochromocytoma12 cells. Furthermore, gallic acid effectively inhibited fibril formation by the amyloid-beta peptide, the putative causative agent in Alzheimers disease. It is concluded that the gallate moiety has the fibril-inhibitory activity.
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Defective lung macrophage function in lung cancer ± chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD/emphysema)-mediated by cancer cell production of PGE2?
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD/emphysema) we have shown a reduced ability of lung and alveolar (AM) macrophages to phagocytose apoptotic cells (defective efferocytosis), associated with evidence of secondary cellular necrosis and a resultant inflammatory response in the airway. It is unknown whether this defect is present in cancer (no COPD) and if so, whether this results from soluble mediators produced by cancer cells. We investigated efferocytosis in AM (26 controls, 15 healthy smokers, 37 COPD, 20 COPD+ non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 8 patients with NSCLC without COPD) and tumor and tumor-free lung tissue macrophages (21 NSCLC with/13 without COPD). To investigate the effects of soluble mediators produced by lung cancer cells we then treated AM or U937 macrophages with cancer cell line supernatant and assessed their efferocytosis ability. We qualitatively identified Arachidonic Acid (AA) metabolites in cancer cells by LC-ESI-MSMS, and assessed the effects of COX inhibition (using indomethacin) on efferocytosis. Decreased efferocytosis was noted in all cancer/COPD groups in all compartments. Conditioned media from cancer cell cultures decreased the efferocytosis ability of both AM and U937 macrophages with the most pronounced effects occurring with supernatant from SCLC (an aggressive lung cancer type). AA metabolites identified in cancer cells included PGE2. The inhibitory effect of PGE2 on efferocytosis, and the involvement of the COX-2 pathway were shown. Efferocytosis is decreased in COPD/emphysema and lung cancer; the latter at least partially a result of inhibition by soluble mediators produced by cancer cells that include PGE2.
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?B-Crystallin inhibits the cell toxicity associated with amyloid fibril formation by ?-casein and the amyloid-? peptide.
Cell Stress Chaperones
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2010
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Amyloid fibril formation is associated with diseases such as Alzheimers, Parkinsons, and prion diseases. Inhibition of amyloid fibril formation by molecular chaperone proteins, such as the small heat-shock protein ?B-crystallin, may play a protective role in preventing the toxicity associated with this form of protein misfolding. Reduced and carboxymethylated ?-casein (RCM?-CN), a protein derived from milk, readily and reproducibly forms fibrils at physiological temperature and pH. We investigated the toxicity of fibril formation by RCM?-CN using neuronal model PC12 cells and determined whether the inhibition of fibril formation altered its cell toxicity. To resolve ambiguities in the literature, we also investigated whether fibril formation by amyloid-?1-40 (A?(1-40)), the peptide associated with Alzheimers disease, was inhibited by ?B-crystallin and if this affected the toxicity of A?. To this end, either RCM?-CN or A?(1-40) was incubated at neutral pH to induce fibril formation before treating PC12 cells and assessing cell viability. Incubated (fibrillar) RCM?-CN was more toxic to PC12 cells than native RCM?-CN with the highest level of toxicity being associated with mature fibrils and protofibrils. Furthermore, the toxicity of RCM?-CN was attenuated when its fibril formation was inhibited, either through the chaperone action of ?B-crystallin or when it interacted with its natural binding partners in milk, ?(S)- and ?-casein. Likewise, incubating A?(1-40) with ?B-crystallin inhibited both A?(1-40) fibril formation and the associated cell toxicity. Importantly, by inhibiting fibril formation, ?B-crystallin prevents the cell toxicity associated with protein misfolding.
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(-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) maintains kappa-casein in its pre-fibrillar state without redirecting its aggregation pathway.
J. Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2009
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The polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has recently attracted much research interest in the field of protein-misfolding diseases because of its potent anti-amyloid activity against amyloid-beta, alpha-synuclein and huntingtin, the amyloid-fibril-forming proteins involved in Alzheimers, Parkinsons and Huntingtons diseases, respectively. EGCG redirects the aggregation of these polypeptides to a disordered off-folding pathway that results in the formation of non-toxic amorphous aggregates. Whether this anti-fibril activity is specific to these disease-related target proteins or is more generic remains to be established. In addition, the mechanism by which EGCG exerts its effects, as with all anti-amyloidogenic polyphenols, remains unclear. To address these aspects, we have investigated the ability of EGCG to inhibit amyloidogenesis of the generic model fibril-forming protein RCMkappa-CN (reduced and carboxymethylated kappa-casein) and thereby protect pheochromocytoma-12 cells from RCMkappa-CN amyloid-induced toxicity. We found that EGCG potently inhibits in vitro fibril formation by RCMkappa-CN [the IC(50) for 50 microM RCMkappa-CN is 13+/-1 microM]. Biophysical studies reveal that EGCG prevents RCMkappa-CN fibril formation by stabilising RCMkappa-CN in its native-like state rather than by redirecting its aggregation to the disordered, amorphous aggregation pathway. Thus, while it appears that EGCG is a generic inhibitor of amyloid-fibril formation, the mechanism by which it achieves this inhibition is specific to the target fibril-forming polypeptide. It is proposed that EGCG is directed to the amyloidogenic sheet-turn-sheet motif of monomeric RCMkappa-CN with high affinity by strong non-specific hydrophobic associations. Additional non-covalent pi-pi stacking interactions between the polyphenolic and aromatic residues common to the amyloidogenic sequence are also implicated.
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Methionine oxidation enhances ?-casein amyloid fibril formation.
J. Agric. Food Chem.
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The effects of protein oxidation, for example of methionine residues, are linked to many diseases, including those of protein misfolding, such as Alzheimers disease. Protein misfolding diseases are characterized by the accumulation of insoluble proteinaceous aggregates comprised mainly of amyloid fibrils. Amyloid-containing bodies known as corpora amylacea (CA) are also found in mammary secretory tissue, where their presence slows milk flow. The major milk protein ?-casein readily forms amyloid fibrils under physiological conditions. Milk exists in an extracellular oxidizing environment. Accordingly, the two methionine residues in ?-casein (Met(95) and Met(106)) were selectively oxidized and the effects on the fibril-forming propensity, cellular toxicity, chaperone ability, and structure of ?-casein were determined. Oxidation resulted in an increase in the rate of fibril formation and a greater level of cellular toxicity. ?-Casein, which inhibits ?-casein fibril formation in vitro, was less effective at suppressing fibril formation of oxidized ?-casein. The ability of ?-casein to prevent the amorphous aggregation of target proteins was slightly enhanced upon methionine oxidation, which may arise from the proteins greater exposed surface hydrophobicity. No significant changes to ?-caseins intrinsically disordered structure occurred upon oxidation. The enhanced rate of fibril formation of oxidized ?-casein, coupled with the reduced chaperone ability of ?-casein to prevent this aggregation, may affect casein-casein interaction within the casein micelle and thereby promote ?-casein aggregation and contribute to the formation of CA.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.