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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Hemimandibular hyperplasia: classification and treatment algorithm revisited.
J Craniofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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Hemimandibular hyperplasia (HH) is a developmental asymmetry characterized by three-dimensional enlargement of one half of the mandible. The hyperplastic side usually involves the condyle, condylar neck, ramus, and body, with the anomaly terminating abruptly at the symphysis. The malformation results in the clinical presentation of ipsilateral enlargement of the mandible and tilted occlusal plane, associated with a deviated chin to the contralateral side. Since the first case report of HH in the English literature in 1836, various terminology and classifications were used. In this study, the authors classified the patients into typical and atypical types of HH on the basis of clinical and radiologic observations in an effort to achieve a simplified and efficient surgical management on the basis of the severity of deformity. Accordingly, surgical treatments are designed respectively on the basis of the authors' classification and treatment algorithm. In addition, in view of potential complications arising from condylectomy, none of the patients had undergone condylectomy as part of the surgical treatment. The authors present their experience on the basis of this proposed classification and treatment algorithm with functional and aesthetic outcomes as the end points of this study.
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Single stage surgery for contouring the prominent mandibular angle with a broad chin deformity: En-bloc Mandibular Angle-Body-Chin Curved Ostectomy (MABCCO) and Outer Cortex Grinding (OCG).
J Craniomaxillofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
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Various surgical options are reported to address the Asian 'squared face', characterized by a prominent mandibular angle (PMA) associated with an oversized chin deformity; but shortcomings lie in the requirement of multi-stage procedures with the risk of further revision surgery. We have developed a single-stage "Mandibular Angle-Body-Chin Curved Ostectomy (MABCCO) and Outer Cortex Grinding (OCG)" surgical technique to shorten the period of the surgical treatment and minimize the inherent surgical risks in the multi-staged procedures.
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Low molecular weight heparin for prevention of microvascular occlusion in digital replantation.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2013
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The success of digital replantation is highly dependent on the patency of the repaired vessels after microvascular anastomosis. Antithrombotic agents are frequently used for preventing vascular occlusion. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) has been reported to be as effective as unfractionated heparin (UFH) in peripheral vascular surgery, but with fewer adverse effects. Its benefit in microvascular surgery such as digital replantation is unclear.
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Fingertip replantation without venous anastomosis.
Ann Plast Surg
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2013
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Replantation of amputated fingertips is a technical challenge, as many salvage procedures fail because no suitable vein in the fingertip is available for anastomosis. In this study, we examined our experience in fingertip replantation in cases without venous anastomosis with our established fingertip replantation treatment protocol.
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Soft-tissue volumetric changes following monobloc distraction procedure: analysis using digital three-dimensional photogrammetry system (3dMD).
J Craniofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2013
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We have previously reported that monobloc advancement by distraction osteogenesis resulted in decreased morbidity and greater advancement with less relapse compared with acute monobloc advancement with bone grafting. In this study, we examine the three-dimensional (3D) volumetric soft-tissue changes in monobloc distraction.Patients with syndromic craniosynostosis who underwent monobloc distraction from 2002 to 2010 at University of California-Los Angeles Craniofacial Center were studied (n = 12). We recorded diagnosis, indications for the surgery, and volumetric changes for skeletal and soft-tissue midface structures (preoperative/postoperative [6 weeks]/follow-up [>1 year]). Computed tomography scans and a digital 3D photogrammetry system were used for image analysis.Patients ranged from 6 to 14 years of age (mean, 10.1 years) at the time of the operation (follow-up 2-11 years); mean distraction advancement was 19.4 mm (range, 14-25 mm). There was a mean increase in the 3D volumetric soft-tissue changes: 99.5 ± 4.0 cm(3) (P < 0.05) at 6 weeks and 94.9 ± 3.6 cm(3) (P < 0.05) at 1-year follow-up. When comparing soft-tissue changes at 6 weeks postoperative to 1-year follow-up, there were minimal relapse changes. The overall mean 3D skeletal change was 108.9 ± 4.2 cm. For every 1 cm of skeletal gain, there was 0.78 cm(3) of soft-tissue gain.Monobloc advancement by distraction osteogenesis using internal devices resulted in increased volumetric soft-tissue changes, which remained stable at 1 year. The positive linear correlation between soft-tissue increments and bony advancement can be incorporated during the planning of osteotomies to achieve optimum surgical outcomes with monobloc distraction.
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Repair of Tessier no. 3 and no. 4 craniofacial clefts with facial unit and muscle repositioning by midface rotation advancement without Z-plasties.
Plast. Reconstr. Surg.
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The accepted surgical correction of Tessier no. 3 and no. 4 craniofacial clefts is the use of interdigitating skin flaps along the line of the facial cleft, which frequently results in unsightly facial scars, poor skin color match, and an unnatural facial expression. The authors report their technique of midface rotation-advancement concept to repair these craniofacial clefts.
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18-gauge needle cap as adjunct to prevent kinking of endotracheal tube.
J Craniofac Surg
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A self-retaining Dingman mouth retractor is widely used to keep the mouth open during cleft palate and intraoral surgery. The airway is at risk of being crushed or occluded as the gag (tongue plate) of the Dingman mouth retractor is being pushed against the endotracheal tube.Kinking of the endotracheal tube between the teeth and Dingman mouth retractor has been reported even with the oral Ring-Adair-Elwyn or flexometallic or armored endotracheal tubes. To minimize kinking of the endotracheal tube and its consequent complications, we routinely insert an 18-gauge needle cap at the potential space between the teeth and the tongue plate (gag) of the Dingman mouth retractor, which is situated lateral to the endotracheal tube. In our experience of approximately 5000 intraoral cases using a Dingman mouth retractor and 18-gauge needle cap, we have not had any tooth avulsion or aspiration of the 18-gauge foreign body while maintaining a consistent and secured airway during cleft palate and intraoral surgery.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.