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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Factors associated with fulfilling the preference for dying at home among cancer patients: the role of general practitioners.
J Palliat Care
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2014
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This study aimed to explore clinical and care-related factors associated with fulfilling cancer patients' preference for home death across four countries: Belgium (BE), The Netherlands (NL), Italy (IT), and Spain (ES).
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Decision-making concerning unwanted pregnancy in general practice.
Fam Pract
PUBLISHED: 07-05-2014
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In the Netherlands, termination of pregnancy is legal under well-defined conditions. Before undergoing the procedure, women have to observe a 5-day 'reflection period'. The official start of this period has to be established by a medical doctor, most frequently the GP.
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Resource use and costs of type 2 diabetes patients receiving managed or protocolized primary care: a controlled clinical trial.
BMC Health Serv Res
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2014
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The increasing prevalence of diabetes is associated with increased health care use and costs. Innovations to improve the quality of care, manage the increasing demand for health care and control the growth of health care costs are needed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the care process and costs of managed, protocolized and usual care for type 2 diabetes patients from a societal perspective.
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Burden on family carers and care-related financial strain at the end of life: a cross-national population-based study.
Eur J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2014
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The rising number of deaths from cancer and other life-limiting illnesses is accompanied by a growing number of family carers who provide long-lasting care, including end-of-life care. This population-based epidemiological study aimed to describe and compare in four European countries the prevalence of and factors associated with physical or emotional overburden and difficulties in covering care-related costs among family carers of people at the end of life.
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Mental health and health-care use of detainees in police custody.
J Forensic Leg Med
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2014
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In many countries, forensic physicians function as primary care providers for detainees in police custody. Their task is comparable to the tasks of general practitioners. Nevertheless, problems presented by both patient populations may differ. We therefore aimed to systematically compare presented problems and medication use in a population of police detainees to those of regular patients in general practice.
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Low varicella-related consultation rate in the Netherlands in primary care data.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2014
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In the Netherlands, a relatively low varicella disease burden compared to other European countries is observed within routine surveillance. To validate this, we estimated the varicella-related consultation rate using The Integrated Primary Care Information database.
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Actual and preferred place of death of home-dwelling patients in four European countries: making sense of quality indicators.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Dying at home and dying at the preferred place of death are advocated to be desirable outcomes of palliative care. More insight is needed in their usefulness as quality indicators. Our objective is to describe whether "the percentage of patients dying at home" and "the percentage of patients who died in their place of preference" are feasible and informative quality indicators.
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Consultations for sexually transmitted infections in the general practice in the Netherlands: an opportunity to improve STI/HIV testing.
BMJ Open
PUBLISHED: 12-30-2013
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In the Netherlands, sexually transmitted infection (STI) care is provided by general practitioners (GPs) as well as by specialised STI centres. Consultations at the STI centres are monitored extensively, but data from the general practice are limited. This study aimed to examine STI consultations in the general practice.
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Partners of cancer patients consult their GPs significantly more often with both somatic and psychosocial problems.
Scand J Prim Health Care
PUBLISHED: 12-05-2013
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Abstract Objective. Partners of cancer patients experience psychological distress and impaired physical health around and after the diagnosis of cancer. It is unknown whether these problems are presented to the general practitioner (GP). This study aimed to establish partners GP use around the diagnosis of cancer. Design. Cohort study. Setting. Primary care. Subjects. Partners of 3071 patients with breast, prostate, colorectal, or lung cancer were included. Patients were diagnosed in 2001-2009 and were alive at least two years after diagnosis. Main outcome measures. Number of GP contacts and health problems in partners between six months before and two years after diagnosis. Results. In the first six months after diagnosis, partners GP use was similar to baseline (18 to six months before diagnosis). Between six and 24 months after diagnosis, GP use was increased in partners of patients with breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer, an increase of 31% (p = 0.001), 26% (p = 0.001), and 19% (p = 0.042), respectively. In partners of patients with breast cancer and colorectal cancer, GP use was increased for both somatic and psychosocial symptoms. In partners of prostate cancer patients, an increase was seen in somatic symptoms, whereas in partners of lung cancer patients, GP use was only increased for psychosocial symptoms. "Problems with the illness of the partner" was a frequently recorded reason for contact in the first six months after diagnosis. Conclusion. GP use of partners of cancer patients is increased 6-24 months after diagnosis, but health problems vary between cancer types. GPs should be alert for somatic and psychosocial problems in partners of cancer patients.
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Palliative sedation in Dutch general practice from 2005 to 2011: a dynamic cohort study of trends and reasons.
Br J Gen Pract
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2013
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Little is known about the quantity and reasons for use of palliative sedation in general practice.
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Comparison of five influenza surveillance systems during the 2009 pandemic and their association with media attention.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2013
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During the 2009 influenza pandemic period, routine surveillance of influenza-like-illness (ILI) was conducted in The Netherlands by a network of sentinel general practitioners (GPs). In addition during the pandemic period, four other ILI/influenza surveillance systems existed. For pandemic preparedness, we evaluated the performance of the sentinel system and the others to assess which of the four could be useful additions in the future. We also assessed whether performance of the five systems was influenced by media reports during the pandemic period.
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An evidence synthesis approach to estimating the incidence of seasonal influenza in the Netherlands.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2013
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To estimate, using Bayesian evidence synthesis, the age-group-specific annual incidence of symptomatic infection with seasonal influenza in the Netherlands over the period 2005-2007.
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GPs recognition of death in the foreseeable future and diagnosis of a fatal condition: a national survey.
BMC Fam Pract
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2013
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Nowadays, palliative care is considered as a care continuum that may start early in the course of the disease. In order to address the evolving needs of patients for palliative care in time, GPs should be aware in good time of the diagnosis and of the imminence of death. The aim of the study was to gain insight into how long before a non-sudden death the diagnosis of the disease ultimately leading to death is made and on what kind of information the diagnosis is based. In addition, we aimed to explore when, and based on what kind of information, GPs become aware that death of a patient will be in the foreseeable future.
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Infectious disease burden related to child day care in the Netherlands.
Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J.
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2013
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Studying day-care-associated infectious disease dynamics aids in formulating evidence-based guidelines for disease control, thereby supporting day-care centers in their continuous efforts to provide their child population with a safe and hygienic environment. The objective of this study was to estimate the (excess) infectious disease burden related to child day-care attendance in the Netherlands.
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The importance of gender-stratified antibiotic resistance surveillance of unselected uropathogens: a Dutch Nationwide Extramural Surveillance study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2013
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Few studies have been performed on urinary tract infections (UTIs) in men. In the present study, general practitioners (n = 42) from the Dutch Sentinel General Practice Network collected urinary samples from 560 male patients (? 18 years) suspected of UTI and recorded prescribed antibiotic treatment. In this way, the antibiotic susceptibility of Gram-negative uropathogens, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-) producing Escherichia coli could be determined. In addition, E. coli susceptibility and antibiotic prescriptions were compared with data from a similar UTI study among women and with data collected 7 years earlier. Of 367 uropathogens (66%) identified (? 10(3) cfu/mL), most were Gram-negative (83%) and E. coli being isolated most frequently (51%). Antibiotic susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and nitrofurantoin was 94%, 92% and 88%, respectively, whereas co-amoxiclav (76%) and co-trimoxazole (80%) showed lower susceptibilities. One ESBL (0.5%) was found. A significantly higher proportion of female UTIs was caused by E. coli compared with men (72% versus 51%, P<0.05). E. coli susceptibility tended to be lower in men compared with women, although not reaching statistical significance. No changes in E. coli susceptibility were observed over time (all P>0.05). Co-amoxiclav and nitrofurantoin prescriptions increased over time (11% versus 28% and 16% versus 23% respectively, both P<0.05), whereas co-trimoxazole prescriptions decreased (24% versus 14%, P<0.05). In conclusion, given the observed gender differences in uropathogen distribution and (tendency in) E. coli antibiotic susceptibility, empirical male UTI treatment options should be based on surveillance studies including men only. When awaiting the culture result is clinically not possible, fluoroquinolones are advised as first-choice antibiotics for male UTIs in Dutch general practices based on current antibiotic susceptibility data. The prevalence of ESBL-producers was low and no differences were observed in antibiotic susceptibility over a 7-year period. In addition, antibiotic prescriptions changed in accordance with national guidelines during this time period.
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Results of a cosmetovigilance survey in The Netherlands.
Contact Derm.
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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Cosmetic products contribute considerably to the incidence of contact dermatitis. In response to a resolution of the Council of Europe, the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) in The Netherlands set up a pilot project to report undesirable effects attributed to cosmetic products.
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End-of-life decisions: a cross-national study of treatment preference discussions and surrogate decision-maker appointments.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2013
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Making treatment decisions in anticipation of possible future incapacity is an important part of patient participation in end-of-life decision-making. This study estimates and compares the prevalence of GP-patient end-of-life treatment discussions and patients appointment of surrogate decision-makers in Italy, Spain, Belgium and the Netherlands and examines associated factors.
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Nationwide continuous monitoring of end-of-life care via representative networks of general practitioners in Europe.
BMC Fam Pract
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2013
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BACKGROUND: Although end-of-life care has become an issue of great clinical and public health concern in Europe and beyond, we lack population-based nationwide data that monitor and compare the circumstances of dying and care received in the final months of life in different countries. The European Sentinel GP Networks Monitoring End of Life Care (EURO SENTIMELC) study was designed to describe and compare the last months of life of patients dying in different European countries. We aim to describe how representative GP networks in the EURO SENTIMELC study operate to monitor end of life care in a country, to describe used methodology, research procedures, representativity and characteristics of the population reached using this methodology. METHODS: Nationwide representative Networks of General Practitioners (GPs) -- ie epidemiological surveillance systems representative of all GPs in a country or large region of a country -- in Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy and Spain continuously registered every deceased patient (>18 year) in their practice, using weekly standardized registration forms, during two consecutive years (2009--2010).All GPs were asked to identify patients who had died "non-suddenly". The last three months of these patients lives was surveyed retrospectively. Several quality control measures were used to ensure data of high scientific quality. RESULTS: A total of 6858 deaths were registered of which two thirds died non-suddenly (from 62% in the Netherlands to 69% in Spain), representative for the GP populations in the participating countries. Of all non-sudden deaths, between 32% and 44% of deaths were aged 85 or older; between 46% and 54% were female, and between 23% and 49% died at home. Cancer was cause of death in 37% to 53% of non-sudden death cases in the four participating countries. CONCLUSION: Via the EURO SENTI-MELC methodology, we can build a descriptive epidemiological database on end-of-life care provision in several EU countries, measuring across setting and diseases. The data can serve as baseline measurement to compare and monitor end-of-life care over time. The use of representative GP networks for end-of-life care monitoring has huge potential in Europe where several of these networks are operational.
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Awareness of general practitioners concerning cancer patients preferences for place of death: evidence from four European countries.
Eur. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2013
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General Practitioners (GPs) are at the first level of contact in many European healthcare systems and they supposedly have a role in supporting cancer patients in achieving their desired place of death. A four-country (Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy and Spain) study was carried out exploring current practices.
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Palliative Care Service Use in Four European Countries: A Cross-National Retrospective Study via Representative Networks of General Practitioners.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Due to a rising number of deaths from cancer and other chronic diseases a growing number of people experience complex symptoms and require palliative care towards the end of life. However, population-based data on the number of people receiving palliative care in Europe are scarce. The objective of this study is to examine, in four European countries, the number of people receiving palliative care in the last three months of life and the factors associated with receiving palliative care.
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Twenty-two years of HIV-related consultations in Dutch general practice: a dynamic cohort study.
BMJ Open
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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To examine the role of general practitioners (GPs) in HIV counselling and testing over a 22-year period.
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Emergence and epidemic occurrence of enterovirus 68 respiratory infections in The Netherlands in 2010.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 10-19-2011
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Following an increase in detection of enterovirus 68 (EV68) in community surveillance of respiratory infections in The Netherlands in 2010, epidemiological and virological analyses were performed to investigate the possible public health impact of EV68 infections. We retrospectively tested specimens collected from acute respiratory infections surveillance and through three children cohort studies conducted in The Netherlands from 1994 through 2010. A total of 71 of 13,310 (0.5%) specimens were positive for EV68, of which 67 (94%) were from symptomatic persons. Twenty-four (34%) of the EV68 positive specimens were collected during 2010. EV68-positive patients with respiratory symptoms showed significantly more dyspnea, cough and bronchitis than EV68-negative patients with respiratory symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis showed an increased VP1 gene diversity in 2010, suggesting that the increased number of EV68 detections in 2010 reflects a real epidemic. Clinical laboratories should consider enterovirus diagnostics in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with respiratory symptoms.
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Influenza A(H1N1) Oseltamivir Resistant Viruses in the Netherlands During the Winter 2007/2008.
Open Virol J
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2011
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Antiviral susceptibility surveillance in the Netherlands was intensified after the first reports about the emergence of influenza A(H1N1) oseltamivir resistant viruses in Norway in January, 2008.
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Recognising patients who will die in the near future: a nationwide study via the Dutch Sentinel Network of GPs.
Br J Gen Pract
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2011
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Recognising patients who will die in the near future is important for adequate planning and provision of end-of-life care. GPs can play a key role in this.
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The relative clinical impact of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in the community compared to seasonal influenza in the Netherlands was most marked among 5-14 year olds.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2011
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So far, most pandemic influenza reports were based on case studies focusing on severe disease. For public health policy, it is essential to consider the overall impact of the pandemic, including mild diseases.
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Oseltamivir-resistant pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 influenza viruses detected through enhanced surveillance in the Netherlands, 2009-2010.
Antiviral Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2011
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Enhanced surveillance of infections due to the pandemic A(H1N1) influenza virus, which included monitoring for antiviral resistance, was carried out in the Netherlands from late April 2009 through late May 2010. More than 1100 instances of infection with the pandemic A(H1N1) influenza virus from 2009 and 2010 [A(H1N1) 2009] distributed across this period were analyzed. Of these, 19 cases of oseltamivir-resistant virus harboring the H275Y mutation in the neuraminidase (NA) were detected. The mean 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) levels for oseltamivir- and zanamivir-susceptible A(H1N1) 2009 viruses were 1.4-fold and 2-fold, respectively, lower than for the seasonal A(H1N1) influenza viruses from 2007/2008; for oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1) 2009 virus the IC50 was 2.9-fold lower. Eighteen of the 19 patients with oseltamivir-resistant virus showed prolonged shedding of the virus and developed resistance while on oseltamivir therapy. Sixteen of these 18 patients had an immunodeficiency, of whom 11 had a hematologic disorder. The two other patients had another underlying disease. Six of the patients who had an underlying disease died; of these, five had received cytostatic or immunosuppressive therapy. No indications for onward transmission of resistant viruses were found. This study showed that the main association for the emergence of cases of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1) 2009 virus was receiving antiviral therapy and having drug-induced immunosuppression or an hematologic disorder. Except for a single case of a resistant virus not linked to oseltamivir therapy, the absence of detection of resistant variants in community specimens and in specimens from contacts of cases with resistant virus suggested that the spread of resistant A(H1N1) 2009 virus was limited. Containment may have been the cumulative result of impaired NA function, successful isolation of the patients, and prophylactic measures to limit exposure.
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Discussing end-of-life issues in the last months of life: a nationwide study among general practitioners.
J Palliat Med
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2011
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Communication is a necessary tool for ensuring the provision of quality patient-centered care for patients who have life-threatening illnesses, and discussing all relevant end-of-life issues should not be limited to cancer patients.
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Advance care planning in Belgium and The Netherlands: a nationwide retrospective study via sentinel networks of general practitioners.
J Pain Symptom Manage
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2011
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Advance care planning (ACP) is an important part of patient-centered palliative care. There have been few nationwide studies of ACP, especially in Europe.
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Detection of excess influenza severity: associating respiratory hospitalization and mortality data with reports of influenza-like illness by primary care physicians.
Am J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2010
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We explored whether excesses in influenza severity can be detected by combining respiratory syndromic hospital and mortality data with data on influenza-like illness (ILI) cases obtained from general practitioners.
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The oldest old and GP end-of-life care in the Dutch community: a nationwide study.
Age Ageing
PUBLISHED: 09-04-2010
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Provision of adequate care for the oldest old is increasingly crucial, given the current ageing trends. This study explores differences in end-of-life care of the oldest (?85 years) versus the younger (65-84 years) old; testing the hypothesis that age could be an independent correlate of receiving specialised palliative care services (SPCS), having palliative-centred treatment and dying in a preferred place.
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Use of palliative care services and general practitioner visits at the end of life in The Netherlands and Belgium.
J Pain Symptom Manage
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2010
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At the end of life, some personalized and specialized care is required. The way that general practitioner (GP) visits and palliative care services at the end of life are organized in different countries may impact the frequency of care provision. However, nationwide data on the prevalence of these interventions and comparisons among countries are scarce.
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Requests for euthanasia in general practice before and after implementation of the Dutch Euthanasia Act.
Br J Gen Pract
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2010
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The Netherlands was the first country in the world to implement a Euthanasia Act in 2002. It is unknown whether legalizing euthanasia under strict conditions influences the number and nature of euthanasia requests.
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Assessing the burden of paediatric influenza in Europe: the European Paediatric Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project.
Eur. J. Pediatr.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2010
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The European Paediatric Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project is a multi-country project that was created to collect, analyse and present data regarding the paediatric influenza burden in European countries, with the purpose of providing the necessary information to make evidence-based decisions regarding influenza immunisation recommendations for children. The initial approach taken is based on existing weekly virological and age-specific influenza-like illness (ILI) data from surveillance networks across Europe. We use a multiple regression model guided by longitudinal weekly patterns of influenza virus to attribute the weekly ILI consultation incidence pattern to each influenza (sub)type, while controlling for the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemics. Modelling the ILI consultation incidence during 2002/2003-2008 revealed that influenza infections that presented for medical attention as ILI affected between 0.3% and 9.8% of children aged 0-4 and 5-14 years in England, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain in an average season. With the exception of Spain, these rates were always higher in children aged 0-4 years. Across the six seasons analysed (five seasons were analysed from the Italian data), the model attributed 47-83% of the ILI burden in primary care to influenza virus infection in the various countries, with the A(H3N2) virus playing the most important role, followed by influenza viruses B and A(H1N1). National season averages from the four countries studied indicated that between 0.4% and 18% of children consulted a physician for ILI, with the percentage depending on the country and health care system. Influenza virus infections explained the majority of paediatric ILI consultations in all countries. The next step will be to apply the EPIA modelling approach to severe outcomes indicators (i.e. hospitalisations and mortality data) to generate a complete range of mild and severe influenza burden estimates needed for decision making concerning paediatric influenza vaccination.
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Syndromic surveillance for local outbreaks of lower-respiratory infections: would it work?
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2010
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Although syndromic surveillance is increasingly used to detect unusual illness, there is a debate whether it is useful for detecting local outbreaks. We evaluated whether syndromic surveillance detects local outbreaks of lower-respiratory infections (LRIs) without swamping true signals by false alarms.
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Transitions between care settings at the end of life in the Netherlands: results from a nationwide study.
Palliat Med
PUBLISHED: 12-10-2009
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Multiple transitions between care settings in the last phase of life could jeopardize continuity of care and overall end-of-life patient care. Using a mortality follow-back study, we examined the nature and prevalence of transitions between Dutch care settings in the last 3 months of life, and identified potential characteristics associated with them. During the 2-year study period, 690 registered patients died totally expectedly and non-suddenly. These made 709 transitions in the last 3 months, which involved a hospital two times out of three, and covered 43 distinct care trajectories. The most frequent trajectory was home-to-hospital (48%). Forty-six percent experienced one or more transitions in their last month of life. Male gender, multi-morbidities, and absence of GP awareness of a patients wish for place of death were associated with having a transition in the last 30 days of life; age of < or = 85 years, having an infection and the absence of a palliative-centred treatment goal were associated with terminal hospitalization for > or = 7 days. Although the majority of the totally expected and non-sudden deaths occurred at home, transitions to hospitals were relatively frequent. To minimize abrupt or frequent transitions just before death, timely recognition of the palliative phase of dying is important.
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[Male urethritis in general practice. STDs more common at a younger age].
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2009
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To estimate the incidence of urethritis in men in Dutch general practice, the applied diagnostic procedures in relation to existing guidelines, and the underlying causes.
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[Combating the new influenza A (H1N1) virus. II. Surveillance and non-pharmaceutical interventions].
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2009
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Intensive surveillance in Mexico, the US, Canada, Spain and the UK has resulted in the first data on the new influenza A (H1N1) virus. As of yet, it is still unknown if, how and where further transmission within the Netherlands will take place. Therefore, intensified surveillance in the Netherlands is essential. Information on individual patients and their contacts is available through the compulsory notification of the new influenza. The number of general practitioners and nursing homes participating in surveillance through national networks is extended. In addition mortality statistics and internet-based surveillance are being used (the Dutch Great Influenza Survey). Based on studies on previous flu epidemics and mathematical models we can estimate the expected effect of non-pharmaceutical interventions.The reduction of social contacts, in particular through the closure of schools, hand washing routines and wearing of facemasks if done correctly, are expected to be effective non-pharmaceutical interventions in slowing the transmission of the new influenza virus.
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General practitioner awareness of preferred place of death and correlates of dying in a preferred place: a nationwide mortality follow-back study in the Netherlands.
J Pain Symptom Manage
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2009
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To improve the quality of end-of-life care, general practitioner (GP) awareness of where their patients prefer to die is important. To examine GP awareness of patients preferred place of death (POD), associated patient- and care-related characteristics, and the congruence between preferred and actual POD in The Netherlands, a mortality follow-back study was conducted between January 2005 and December 2006. Standardized registration forms were used to collect data on all nonsudden deaths (n=637) by means of the Dutch Sentinel Network, a nationally representative network of general practices. Forty-six percent of patients had GPs who were not aware of their preferred POD. Of those whose GPs were aware, 88% had preferred to die in a private or care home, 10% in a hospice or palliative care unit, and 2% in a hospital. GPs were informed by the patients themselves in 84% of cases. Having financial status "above average," a life-prolongation or palliative care goal, and using specialist palliative care services were associated with higher GP-awareness odds. Four-fifth of patients with known preferred POD died there. There is a potential for improving GP awareness of patients preferred POD. Such awareness is enhanced when palliation is an active part of end-of-life care. The hospital is the POD least preferred by dying patients.
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Phylodynamic inference and model assessment with approximate bayesian computation: influenza as a case study.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
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A key priority in infectious disease research is to understand the ecological and evolutionary drivers of viral diseases from data on disease incidence as well as viral genetic and antigenic variation. We propose using a simulation-based, Bayesian method known as Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) to fit and assess phylodynamic models that simulate pathogen evolution and ecology against summaries of these data. We illustrate the versatility of the method by analyzing two spatial models describing the phylodynamics of interpandemic human influenza virus subtype A(H3N2). The first model captures antigenic drift phenomenologically with continuously waning immunity, and the second epochal evolution model describes the replacement of major, relatively long-lived antigenic clusters. Combining features of long-term surveillance data from The Netherlands with features of influenza A (H3N2) hemagglutinin gene sequences sampled in northern Europe, key phylodynamic parameters can be estimated with ABC. Goodness-of-fit analyses reveal that the irregularity in interannual incidence and H3N2s ladder-like hemagglutinin phylogeny are quantitatively only reproduced under the epochal evolution model within a spatial context. However, the concomitant incidence dynamics result in a very large reproductive number and are not consistent with empirical estimates of H3N2s population level attack rate. These results demonstrate that the interactions between the evolutionary and ecological processes impose multiple quantitative constraints on the phylodynamic trajectories of influenza A(H3N2), so that sequence and surveillance data can be used synergistically. ABC, one of several data synthesis approaches, can easily interface a broad class of phylodynamic models with various types of data but requires careful calibration of the summaries and tolerance parameters.
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Diagnostic approach to urinary tract infections in male general practice patients: a national surveillance study.
Br J Gen Pract
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Diagnostic urinary tract infection (UTI) studies have primarily been performed among female patients.
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Discontinuation of reimbursement of benzodiazepines in the Netherlands: does it make a difference?
BMC Fam Pract
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In an attempt to control chronic benzodiazepine use and its costs in the Netherlands, health care insurance reimbursement of this medication was stopped on January 1st 2009. This study investigates whether benzodiazepine prescriptions issued by general practitioners changed during the first two years following implementation of this regulation.
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Utility of the first few100 approach during the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic in the Netherlands.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control
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To guide policy and control measures, decent scientific data are needed for a comprehensive assessment of epidemiological, clinical and virological characteristics of the First Few hundred (FF100) cases. We discuss the feasibility of the FF100 approach during the 2009 pandemic and the added value compared with alternative data sources available.
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Health-care issues and health-care use among detainees in police custody.
J Forensic Leg Med
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Epidemiological research on the physical health status of police detainees is scarce. The present study fills this gap by first studying the somatic reasons for consultation (n = 4396) and related prescriptions (n = 4912) as assessed by the forensic medical service during police detainment. Secondly, a health interview survey was conducted among randomly selected police detainees (n = 264) to collect information regarding their recent disease history and use of health care. Somatic health problems, medical consumption and health risk measures of the detainees were compared with those seen in the general population using general practitioner records and community health survey data. The study showed that, in police detainment, several chronic health conditions more often were the reason for consultation than in the general practice setting. In addition, the health interview survey data demonstrated that after adjustment for age and gender, the police detainees were 1.6 times more likely to suffer from one or more of the studied chronic diseases than the members from the general population. Furthermore, differences in several health risk measures, including body mass index, smoking and alcohol habits and health-care use were observed between the interviewed police detainees and the general population. These results provide insight into the variety of physical health problems of police detainees and are essential to develop optimal treatment strategies in police custody.
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Important treatment aims at the end of life: a nationwide study among GPs.
Br J Gen Pract
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Little is known about treatment aims during the last 3 months of life.
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Macrolide resistance determination and molecular typing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in respiratory specimens collected between 1997 and 2008 in The Netherlands.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
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An important role in the treatment regimens for Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections is played by macrolide (ML) antibiotics. In the past few years, however, a steady increase has been detected in the worldwide prevalence of ML-resistant (ML(r)) M. pneumoniae strains. It is obvious that this increase necessitates a continuous monitoring of ML(r) and, when detected, modification of antibiotic treatment modalities. Previously, we developed a pyrosequencing-based assay system for the genetic determination of ML(r) as well as molecular typing of M. pneumoniae. In this study, the sensitivity of this system was improved by the inclusion of a nested-PCR protocol. The modified system was applied to 114 M. pneumoniae-positive specimens that were obtained from a collection of 4,390 samples from patients with acute respiratory tract infections. These samples were collected between 1997 and 2008 in The Netherlands. The pyrosequencing system produced reliable data in 86% of the specimens that contained >500 M. pneumoniae genome copies/ml of patient sample. Each of these samples contained DNA of the ML-sensitive genotype. While 43% of the samples were found to harbor the M. pneumoniae subtype 1 genotype, 57% contained the subtype 2 genotype. We conclude that the pyrosequencing-based assay system is a useful tool for ML(r) determination and molecular typing of M. pneumoniae in patient samples. ML(r)-associated M. pneumoniae genotypes, however, were not found in the current study population.
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Course of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus infection in Dutch patients.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses
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The clinical dynamics of influenza A(H1N1) 2009 infections in 61 laboratory-confirmed Dutch cases were examined. An episode lasted a median of 7·5 days of which 2 days included fever. Respiratory symptoms resolved slowly, while systemic symptoms peaked early in the episode and disappeared quickly. Severity of each symptom was rated highest in the first few days. Furthermore, diarrhoea was negatively associated with viral load, but not with faecal excretion of influenza virus. Cases with comorbidities appeared to have higher viral loads than the cases without, suggesting a less effective immune response. These results complement information obtained through traditional surveillance.
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Comparing pandemic to seasonal influenza mortality: moderate impact overall but high mortality in young children.
PLoS ONE
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We assessed the severity of the 2009 influenza pandemic by comparing pandemic mortality to seasonal influenza mortality. However, reported pandemic deaths were laboratory-confirmed - and thus an underestimation - whereas seasonal influenza mortality is often more inclusively estimated. For a valid comparison, our study used the same statistical methodology and data types to estimate pandemic and seasonal influenza mortality.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.